Kenyan Teas


Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.

Kenyan Teas

Postby bkichwa » Jan 29th, '07, 00:09

Hi guys,

Was doing some reading on global tea production, and found out that Kenya is like the third of fourth largest tea producer in the world. I found this rather interesting as I always imagined the Asian markets to the be leading producers, by a mile. Have any of you per chance sampled Kenyan tea - and if so what did you think of it?

Would appreciate any feedback.

Thanks.
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Postby Space Samurai » Jan 29th, '07, 00:59

For Christmas I recieved 2 ounces of Kenya Milima Estate FOP, but I didn't care for it. I wouldn't say it was bad, just not my thing.
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Postby bkichwa » Jan 29th, '07, 02:18

Spacesamurai:

How is it comparable to the other good teas out there - or was it so different that such a comparison isn't even possible.
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Postby Space Samurai » Jan 29th, '07, 02:37

If I remember correctly, I only had a few cups before I gave up on it, I'd say it was stronger than a ceylon, not as malty as an assam or dian hong.

It isn't expensive, by all means give it a whirl, you might like it. You can purchase some real cheap from here:

http://www.silvertipstea.com

On that note, I hight reccomend silvertipstea to everyone. It is owned by Anupa Mueler, sister in law to Rahja Banerjee, the owner of the Makaibari Estate in India. She has a great selection of single estate black teas at fantastic prices, I don't think you can get Makaibari Darjeelings cheaper anywhere else. Moderate shipping rates, fast friendly service, and I've recieved free samples of other teas two of the three times I've ordered from her. Its a great way to sample teas from a variety of estates all over the world.

To me one of the great advantages of single estate teas is that if you like it, its easy to find again, and you can shop around for the best prices and service. A 2006 First Flush FTGFOP1S from Makaibari is the same no matter who you buy it from, as long as you trust them.

See, you get me talking about tea, and I will go on and on and on...
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Postby bkichwa » Jan 29th, '07, 03:42

thanks.
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Postby Chip » Jan 29th, '07, 09:39

...as spacesamurai said...it is somewhere between a ceylon and an assam. Most of it goes into teabag production or CTC production and it used used mainly for blending. This is why you never really hear too much about it since it rarely stands alone, and very little goes to the gourmet looseleaf market.

I never found anything outstanding about it on its own.
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Postby Chip » Jan 29th, '07, 10:36

spacesamurai wrote:
To me one of the great advantages of single estate teas is that if you like it, its easy to find again, and you can shop around for the best prices and service. A 2006 First Flush FTGFOP1S from Makaibari is the same no matter who you buy it from, as long as you trust them.


This statement is not exactly correct and is actually pretty far off...Makaibari is a huge producer of great organic Darjeeling tea. But they may have a "bijillion" different lots and each may have its own subtle nuances. This is why one may cost much more than another.
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Re:Kenyan tea

Postby kapellmeister » Jan 29th, '07, 23:15

I have been buying "red" Kenyan tea from Hawthorne Tea Merchant in portland for a few years and really like it.the small cut curls are a delight and produce a rather malty and pungent brew that is fine to my taste buds.

Like has been said:Give it a try.

JD
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Postby bkichwa » Jan 31st, '07, 20:43

thanks, JD.
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Postby kapellmeister » Feb 5th, '07, 01:35

bkichwa wrote:thanks, JD.


My pleasure!!!!!

JD
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Postby Oolongaddict » Feb 15th, '07, 14:09

bkichwa,

Before stepping into Kenyan blends, try Twining's English Breakfast. It's a blend loaded with Kenyan tea. It is highly tannic, bitter, and in my opinion, strong enough to have an octane rating.

Like samurai, it isn't my cup of tea. But if you enjoy ceylons and strong darjeelings, it might be right up your alley.
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