Confession time - Red Rose?


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Confession time - Red Rose?

Postby Drae » Jan 31st, '07, 15:28

So... I grew up drinking red rose. It's so much better than lipton*, and I can't figure out why. Is it the tea itself, or do they add flavouring? And if it's the tea, then what KIND of tea is it? ( realize it's a blend, but can something get me close?) It says Orange Pekoe**, yeah, but I can't find something like that loose - is there a different term I'm missing? Please help me find something close! :)

Also, I think Adagio needs to start stashing ceramic miniatures inside their tea tins. :wink:

Edits:
*I dug around, and apparently Lipton makes Red Rose, now? It's different than their regular black tea, though.

**I did find out that orange pekoe is a rating, not a flavour. I should've known that! I think Red Rose is a Ceylon, though - can anyone verify?
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Postby Chip » Jan 31st, '07, 17:04

I would bet they are (or were) both Ceylon. Ceylon was the basis of Lipton tea from day one. OP is a common grade of Ceylon loose leaf. OP has been printed on boxes of tea for many years...I have a few antique tea tins baring the orange pekoe grade.

But Ceylon has long been the bread and butter of bag tea in the USA...I think because it caught on...probably because it was as not as intense as Irish Breakfast which is mainly Assam or English Breakfast which is mainly Keemun, thus suited the American tastes. Also, Ceylon was very readily available to Lipton since he established and/or bought many tea farms in Ceylon.

The Red Rose was probably either fresher or higher quality Ceylon than Lipton.

It would not surprise me if they are now sneaking some Kenyan into the bags since it is very competitively priced, very available, and they specialize in bag and ctc grades.
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Postby Space Samurai » Jan 31st, '07, 19:29

About a month or so ago, my wife and I watched a special on the History Channel, Modern Marvels: Tea, and I was surprised to find out that some major U.S. tea companies use as many as 40 different teas in their individual blends. Since then I've given up trying to fgure out what teas are being used in cheap tea bags, but I do agree that it's most likely lots of Ceylon, as many ceylons are produced using the CTC, tear, cut, curl, method, which is perfect for tea bags.
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Postby Drae » Feb 2nd, '07, 10:34

Spacesamurai! I saw that program, too!

The only hit I get about red rose probably really only refers to the "original blend" since it mentions that the founder used Ceylons instead of the chinese that many were using at the time. Dunno.

Guess I'll just taste around and see what I like, hmm? :o) Thanks a bunch, though!
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Postby expatCanuck » Feb 5th, '07, 14:06

Just got a sample of adagio's Ceylon Waltz -- and the scent is *very* reminiscent of Red Rose.

So, as already noted, Ceylon is a good bet for at least some of the blend.

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Postby rhpot1991 » Feb 7th, '07, 14:06

I looked into the ingredients of Lipton before, since my mother only drinks Lipton decaf (she has food allergies and it she always falls back on it since she knows it doesn't bother her). Lipton's main tea is Ceylon, but its a mixture of lots of random teas. I don't have any input on what Red Rose is made out of, but your not crazy it does have a unique taste, I can always tell when places use Red Rose for their iced tea.

-John
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Postby Mike in KY » Mar 25th, '07, 16:09

chip wrote:But Ceylon has long been the bread and butter of bag tea in the USA...I think because it caught on...probably because it was as not as intense as Irish Breakfast which is mainly Assam or English Breakfast which is mainly Keemun, thus suited the American tastes. Also, Ceylon was very readily available to Lipton since he established and/or bought many tea farms in Ceylon.
The Red Rose was probably either fresher or higher quality Ceylon than Lipton.


Perhaps China and India teas were too British. I think after that incident in Boston Harbor a couple hundred years ago, maybe the tea from Ceylon and Africa was a bit more palatable to American politics.
And yes, I too prefer Red Rose. But there is another bag tea I was served at the Olive Garden chain that was possibly better. I am unsure of the brand, but it was pretty good. The printing on the white tag was in yellow so it was hard to read in the dim lighting. I think is began with an "M", maybe Margret? Anybody know what it was :?:
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