Turkish black tea

Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.

Postby silverneedles » Jun 30th, '08, 13:07

where do you get Turkish tea in USA?

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Postby rodstnmn » Jul 1st, '08, 21:09

Hi cgencer
Thank you for the post on Turkish tea. I am not Turkish, but I have been introduced to the tea by my nephew who spent some time there.
I have the tea from Filiz as pictured in your post of the Risa tea. Is there any difference? He also gave me a double boiler tea pot similar to the one showed in your post.
He taught me to add a little bay leaf and clove with the tea while it cooks, and then serve with lemon and usually, I'm told, heavily sweetened.
I usually drink tea Turkish style in spurts. Your post is going to bring on another spurt.
Thanks,
Rod

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Postby chamekke » Jul 1st, '08, 22:09

Thank you, cgencer, for pointing out this omission! Wow, I'd love to try Turkish tea some time. It sounds like the tea version of espresso!

Your two-level tea kettle sounds like the samovar (Turkish semaver) - is that correct? I've seen samovars (I knew a Russian family that had two or three heirloom ones), but sadly, never in operation.

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Postby rodstnmn » Jul 1st, '08, 23:44

This will give you a good idea of how it's done. Check out the samovar by clicking on "picture". It's just like mine. What do you think cgencer?
http://www.turkishcookbook.com/2007/02/turkish-tea.php

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Postby chamekke » Jul 2nd, '08, 12:20

Thanks! Looks like the caydanlik (below) is the way to go for "personal" amounts of tea, then. It really does look, to my ignorant eyes, like a tea-ified version of an espresso maker. Very cool.

Image

There's a wonderful Middle Eastern supermarket in my town, they have lots of Turkish delicacies. I'll have to take a peek and see if they have these.

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Postby Riene » Jul 2nd, '08, 13:45

How do you serve it? With milk, sugar, or mint? It sounds quite strong..I'd like to try it!

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Postby rodstnmn » Jul 2nd, '08, 21:19

I agree with you cgencer it just seems to work better using the proper glasses and saucer.
What do you think of adding bay leaf and clove. The people who taught me insist that it is the only to go. It does seem to work with lemon and sugar. Although I'm getting away from that and drinking it black now.
Another thing is that the Turkish tea really benefits from being "cooked". I tried brewing it normally and it didn't taste very good. I also tried cooking a malty assam that I had, and I did not like it either.
I think Turkish tea is designed to be used in a double boiler tea pot. I must say it works very well.
I was told you can add lemon and or sugar but milk is a no-no.
It is just like any other tea. You can have it as strong or weak as you wish.

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Postby Shai Guy » Jul 4th, '08, 18:49

I am Middle Eastern and all over the Arab world they sell this brand of Turkish tea called Caykur.In Iraq and some parts of Syria,they drink Tea made in the way was as Turkish people make it with the double pots.

Caykur Tea is very inexpensive,I have seen half a pound sell for $3.50 in some Middle Eastern shops here in the states.Usually there are a few different bags but I can not read Turkish to understand the difference Between them.

Cgencer,can you tell me which brand of Caykur Tea would brew good using traditional methods??

I was thinking to try this one out. http://www.buyarabic.com/storeitem.asp?ic=FB500153GE574

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Postby Eastree » Jul 6th, '08, 13:56

I definitely *did* enjoy the tea when I was living in Turkey! It's good to see its promotion elsewhere.

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Postby rodstnmn » Jul 6th, '08, 22:59

Hi Shai Guy,

Nice to meet you.

I have that exact tea that you have shown in your post. So I tried a side by side test.
Using 2g of tea with 12oz of water, I cooked one Turkish style for 15 minutes, the other traditional and steeped for 15 min.
The traditioal way was lighter in color, more than I would have expected. It had a slightly different after taste, and had a slight bite to it where the cooked did not.
The two were not miles apart, but I preferred the cooked much better.

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