Lipton Loose Leaf Tea in America


Fully oxidized tea leaves for a robust cup.

Lipton Loose Leaf Tea in America

Postby Shai Guy » Jul 4th, '08, 18:39

I picked up a box of Lipton loose leaf Tea at Wal-Mart.It was a little under 4 bucks for half a pound.Is this the same kind sold overseas as Yellow Label???

I think it is CTC if what I read was correct,it's mostly small leaves with a few medium sized ones but nothing like the Whole Leaf Tea I have so this is why I assumed it is CTC but I am still learning.

I actually really like it.It's strong and never brews bitter unless I infuse it for over 6 minutes.I usually add Cardamom and Cinnamon in the pot while I infuse it and add sugar when it is done brewing.It's pretty good.

Another question I have,when people speak of the "strength" of Tea,are they talking taste-wise or stimulant wise?? I could never figure out.

In the Middle East they brew a few teaspoons of Tea with a lot of water and it comes out strong because the way they boil the leaves but stimulant wise its pretty weak.
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Postby omegapd » Jul 5th, '08, 03:34

I'm on my 3rd box of the loose Lipton. I like it too. Much different than the bagged, it makes a nice, stout, Scottish Breakfast type of tea. I don't know if it's the same thing as the overseas label or not. I looked one night on Amazon and they have 3 or 4 different varieties of Lipton loose leaf for sale there.
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Postby Riene » Jul 5th, '08, 08:29

I have some here. It makes a nice strong black tea for making iced tea.
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Re: Lipton Loose Leaf Tea in America

Postby joelbct » Jul 5th, '08, 11:47

Shai Guy wrote:Another question I have,when people speak of the "strength" of Tea,are they talking taste-wise or stimulant wise?? I could never figure out.


I don't know, to be honest I don't hear "weak" or "strong" used to describe tea all that often, and these terms might have to do with the length of brewing time and concentration of tea-to-water used, which isn't really a reflection of the tea itself. Perhaps "astringent, full, complex, robust, mild, etc" are more common terms used to describe tea "strength," and these would refer to the taste/flavor profile of the tea.

Not so sure about Wal-mart or Lipton, although I know that Sir Thomas did a lot to distribute tea to the poorer classes previously unable to afford it in the West, and there are no-doubt similarities btwn Lipton and Walton.

Image

From Wikipedia:

"The following year he opened his first provision shop - Lipton's Market - at 101 Stobcross Street in the Anderston area of Glasgow. This enterprise proved to be successful and Lipton soon established a chain of groceries, first across Glasgow, the rest of Scotland, until finally he had stores throughout Britain.

While Lipton was expanding his empire, tea prices were falling and supply was growing among his middle class customers. In 1888, when his empire had grown to 300 stores, he entered the tea trade and opened his tea-tasting office.

He started bypassing traditional trading and wholesale distribution channels (most UK tea-trading was focused in London's Mincing Lane) in order to sell teas at unprecedented prices to the untapped poor working class market.

In order to provide his shops with goods Lipton bought plantations and in doing so - amongst other things - he established the famous Lipton tea brand which is still in existence today.

Thomas Lipton visited Sri Lanka in the 1890s and made business deals with James Taylor the man who introduced tea plantations to Sri Lanka (Ceylon). Lipton's company purchased good quality tea from Sri Lanka and distributed it through Europe and the USA."


If you like lipton, try ordering a Ceylon or Assam from Adagio, which will probably be a much better quality tea than something you would find at a grocery store.
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Postby Shai Guy » Jul 6th, '08, 01:13

omegapd wrote:I'm on my 3rd box of the loose Lipton. I like it too. Much different than the bagged, it makes a nice, stout, Scottish Breakfast type of tea. I don't know if it's the same thing as the overseas label or not. I looked one night on Amazon and they have 3 or 4 different varieties of Lipton loose leaf for sale there.


I've never tried Scottish Breakfast Tea but I've have had the English and Irish versions.I liked the Irish version better because it had a better,deeper taste to me.

I like this Lipton loose a lot as well,has a better flavor than another loose black Tea I have.This other one is whole leaf.It's not too bad but it's pretty light,it is good for brewing Mint Tea though so I will use it up :).

I actually wrote to Lipton and asked them if this American Loose Tea is the same as their overseas Yellow Label and the person who wrote back did not answer my question,he/she simply stated that Yellow Label was only sold overseas... DUHHHH I already knew that lol.

I may pick some Yellow Label up for an on-line import shop to see if it's the same as this one.

Another thing about this Lipton loose is it's great for making Indian/Pakistani style Milk Tea,the flavor of the Tea still shines through over the Spices and Milk,I did not get that from Whole Leaf black Tea.
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Postby Riene » Jul 6th, '08, 08:32


Joelbct, thanks for the history of the Lipton's brand! That was interesting.
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