Thai Tea


Let us know if you've found the perfect product for Adagio to sell.

Postby Tadiera » Nov 4th, '05, 14:56

Anonymous wrote:ha ha ha ha.. it is look liked everyone is having fun here.....For all I can see, Lana called Dye instead of food color in the Thai tea. Is there any difference between "Dye" and " Food color" Anyone know...


Well, the first difference is the names: 'Dye' is very different from 'Food Color'.

The other issue may be is that 'Dye' is a very large category. Perhaps someone forgot that food coloring is a dye and upon seeing dye, they thought of hair color, or perhaps dyes used to color cloth (tie-dye tea anyone?).
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Postby Guest2 » Nov 4th, '05, 15:20

Guest, I am befuddled to know that you are actually a business person. What kind of representation are you giving yourself with such ridiculous ramblings?

Just for the record, food coloring and dye are one and the same. Why continue to push such a moot point?

To the rest of the Adagio chatters, keep up with the interesting posts. 8)
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Postby klemptor » Nov 4th, '05, 15:28

Well stated, Guest2. I agree.
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Postby floridahawk » Nov 5th, '05, 22:27

I think food coloring is a generic term for what can be dyes and lakes. Which actually in some ways have similar properties but are different. Dyes, lakes, and pigments have been used for thousands of years and on all inhabitable continents. Dyes can found in many foods, cosmetics, textiles, paper, wood, fur, and leather.

A dye is a coloring agent that is chemically bound to a substrate (a textile for instance) and permeates it fully. It is typically water soluble, but not always. It tends to have a loose association with the substrate and the color can be lost over time. Almost all dyes are organic.

A pigment is a coloring agent that is applied to the surface of a substrate with the help of a binder. It is typically not water-soluble. May find their use in ceramics, paints, and also in cosmetics. While a dye can only transmit, absorb, or reflect light, some pigments/binders can scatter light. Most are inorganic. I do not think that pigments are typically used in food, but I may be wrong.

A lake is a combination of a dye and a mineral in the form of a powder or solid that may be used as a pigment. Basically you take a dye mix it up with a solid substrate such as chalk or kaolin clay and use it like it was a pigment. You can find these in cosmetics, and foods, I know because I have used them in R & D for breath films. (Oh god bringing back nightmares of one of the worse jobs I have ever had).

Just a warning to anyone that might be playing with actual food grade dyes, the FD & C blue # 4 is very fine and powdery. Trust me when I say that it is very easy to make a cloud of it, accidentally breath in the fine particles and suddenly have lips, tongue, and noise hairs that are electric blue that lasts for a few days (i.e. You become a smurf and oh it gives you blue snot too). It can also land on surfaces and appear not to be present until water is added then suddenly everything is electric blue! Fortunately, it will not permanently stain clothing but will last for a few days on your skin. Trust me I know all to well!!!!

Hope this answers your question, probably more than you wanted to know.
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Postby Guest » Nov 7th, '05, 08:34

You all know what the meaning of "Dye" and " food color". People just don't say there is dye in food.
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Postby Tadiera » Nov 7th, '05, 10:47

Anonymous wrote:You all know what the meaning of "Dye" and " food color". People just don't say there is dye in food.


Actually, they do.
I have heard the question: "Is there red dye in that?" many times in my life. A lot of people are allergic to the red dyes in food. They don't say "is there red food coloring in that?", they say red dye. The label marks it as dye (or as floridahawk noted: lakes).

So, yes, dye does get used as a term.
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Postby Guest » Nov 8th, '05, 00:30

But Tadiera, when people mentioned red dye, you know that they did not meant well to the food they were reffered to. Therefore, I am totally agreed with the guest who said this:

You all know what the meaning of "Dye" and " food color". People just don't say there is dye in food.
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Postby Marlene » Nov 8th, '05, 03:43

Anonymous wrote:But Tadiera, when people mentioned red dye, you know that they did not meant well to the food they were reffered to. Therefore, I am totally agreed with the guest who said this:

You all know what the meaning of "Dye" and " food color". People just don't say there is dye in food.

yeah, i'm sure you agree with the 'guest' who said that, because you are almost certainly the same 'guest' (i might be wrong, but i don't think i am)
everybody here knew what lana meant. exept for the vendor, (ahem 'guest') who wanted to pick a fight when she gave it a bad review. Back off. you aren't going to convince anybody here. We all support lana, and as a result of your (excuse me, the vendor's) bashing, no one here is going to buy the tea from that site.
All that's been accomplished here is convincing a potential base of buyers to never buy, because the vendor has turned out to be a nasty net-troll.
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Postby chris » Nov 8th, '05, 10:15

Guest,

Please see my post re: sign in...

Big pet peeve of mine.

Best,

Chris
Adagio Maestro
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Postby Guest » Nov 9th, '05, 10:41

Meow ...Meow...Meow.....
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Postby teaspoon » Nov 9th, '05, 11:26

Yes, now that you mention it, you have been rather catty, Guest. Glad you've admitted it.

~teaspoon
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Heated Discourse

Postby Madam Potts » Nov 9th, '05, 12:05

My My My this is a heated arguement. ...

What is the perfect temperature for an arguement?

160 degrees for mere annoyance

180 degrees for pure frustration (and most green teas)

and for lingernig anger that lasts for days and multiple posts, a rolling boil....

:wink:
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Postby Guest » Nov 21st, '05, 23:00

No one admiting any thing, just fingers pointing
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Postby Guest » Nov 21st, '05, 23:07

it is still me.. I forgot to point out that adagio is with the Thai tea too....
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Guest user

Postby Teastir » Nov 21st, '05, 23:41

Do you speak english?
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