Cycle commuting


Completely off the Topic of Tea

Re: Cycle commuting

Postby MEversbergII » Jan 8th, '14, 12:36

Some light sandpaper or steel wool can buff away rim paint without damaging the rims. What kind of brakes are they?

M.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Chip » Jan 8th, '14, 14:22

... you don't want to mess with sloppy brakes! :idea: :!: :wink:
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby 茶藝-TeaArt08 » Jan 9th, '14, 18:41

MEversbergII wrote:Sounds like you're off to a good start! I haven't done any truing work, either. The wrenches are cheap, but the stands are not. However, I've been told that if you toss in some brand new brake pads, you can use your rear brakes as a guide.

M.


I've used this method with a friend on a bike ride when his spoke broke and also one other time when we were preparing for a ride and a friend's back wheel (Ksyriums) was out. We went off his brakes, trued the wheel to ridable quality and then widened the brake arms just a tad. He had a good ride and then took his bike to a shop to get a solid true when we got home. It definitely changed my mind. Now, if I were to go on a longer ride (50-100 mile ride), I'd take my Ksyrium spoke tool along to help in a pinch.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Ursinos » Jan 21st, '14, 17:12

Bicycles have been my primary mode of transportation just about my whole life :D I've never had a drivers license, and until recently never really saw a need to get one.

At one point, during the summers, I was commuting back and forth to work at 10km each way (I could beat the bus on the time it took me to get to work, which was a bonus when it came to getting home lol).

It certainly makes for a great way to shake off the stress from work. 20 minutes or so in the saddle with your heartrate up really burns it away.

These days, being unemployed at the moment, I'm mostly biking for fun and exercise, but when the weather allows for it, I do LOTS of it. (current goal is to build up to doing a 100km ride, my current record is 40km in a single ride).

That whole wheel truing thing is the only repair/maintenance that I can't do myself as well, and the whole reason that when I bought a new bike last year, I specifically went for one with disc breaks. At my weight, I REALLY need good stopping power.

I really should look into taking a workshop on wheel truing one of these days.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Teaism » Jan 21st, '14, 21:13

If you are doing 100km ride it is good to bring along some sports drink that contain electrolytes otherwise you will get cramp easily. A "power gel" or some carbohydrate to eat along the way is also another good consideration, otherwise you will get bonked.

I did over 100km on single ride very very often in my racing/training days and have to rely on these. I think the furthest I did for single ride is more than 200km. For long distance training, it is good to increase the distance gradually by 10% every week, assuming you are training about 3-4 times a week.

After every ride , your "glycogen window" will open and you need to replenish within that half an hour to recover. I recalled in the races, some last more than a week and we did more than 100-150km of racing everyday so the recovery is really important.

Well, that is what happen in races, you can moderate them for your plan and leisure but it is good to look into the drinks and food if you are embarking on a longer distance.

Have fun!
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby jayinhk » Jan 21st, '14, 23:32

Had no problems with the painted rims in Kota Kinabalu--I just rode more carefully. Once my seat was set correctly resisting the pedals worked just fine! I don't want to sand them down as they'd look terrible then!

Did a ride for the HK Harbourfront Cycleway on Sunday...pretty cool, but the pace was so slow for much of the ride that I had to put my foot down and scoot along! A little kid fell off his bike and put a nice little gouge in my new frame too...nothing that can't be touched up easily though!

In Mumbai now and I hope to get an Indian roadster here in the next few days.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Ursinos » Jan 22nd, '14, 03:19

Teaism wrote:If you are doing 100km ride it is good to bring along some sports drink that contain electrolytes otherwise you will get cramp easily. A "power gel" or some carbohydrate to eat along the way is also another good consideration, otherwise you will get bonked.

I did over 100km on single ride very very often in my racing/training days and have to rely on these. I think the furthest I did for single ride is more than 200km. For long distance training, it is good to increase the distance gradually by 10% every week, assuming you are training about 3-4 times a week.

After every ride , your "glycogen window" will open and you need to replenish within that half an hour to recover. I recalled in the races, some last more than a week and we did more than 100-150km of racing everyday so the recovery is really important.

Well, that is what happen in races, you can moderate them for your plan and leisure but it is good to look into the drinks and food if you are embarking on a longer distance.

Have fun!


I'm not really biking right now. Having to deal with back issues, and the weather here is just too damned cold to ride (I don't have any cold weather gear appropriate for riding). Once the weather isn't so frigid though, I will be in the saddle again, doing just that, gradually upping my distance each week.

I know about hydration, I generally make my own hydration drinks (commercial stuff is just too sugary for me). I'll keep in mind about the refueling though. Thanks
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Teaism » Jan 22nd, '14, 09:31

Yes those commercial sports drinks are too sweet. I usually buy those electrolytes for medical use and mixed them myself.

For nutrition, the 1st hour we normally burned stored glycogen and I usually replenish say about 200-300 calories of carbo at 30mins or 45 mins in the ride. If it is higher intensity, every half an hour, if low, every hour. That will keep you going for a long time. When you finished riding, immediately load some carbo and protein to kick off the recovery process. Try it out and do your own adjustment to suit your fitness.

Cycling is really fun. I am still keep my old racing bike, Conalgo Titanio, which I clocked more than 100,000km :shock: with that bike. Really sentimental value. :)
Now I ride for fun around parks and sometimes wheel suck some peloton for fun.

Cheers!...and back to the brewing table...a 2003 Youle waiting. :D
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Ursinos » Jan 22nd, '14, 11:25

Teaism wrote:Yes those commercial sports drinks are too sweet. I usually buy those electrolytes for medical use and mixed them myself.

For nutrition, the 1st hour we normally burned stored glycogen and I usually replenish say about 200-300 calories of carbo at 30mins or 45 mins in the ride. If it is higher intensity, every half an hour, if low, every hour. That will keep you going for a long time. When you finished riding, immediately load some carbo and protein to kick off the recovery process. Try it out and do your own adjustment to suit your fitness.

Cycling is really fun. I am still keep my old racing bike, Conalgo Titanio, which I clocked more than 100,000km :shock: with that bike. Really sentimental value. :)
Now I ride for fun around parks and sometimes wheel suck some peloton for fun.

Cheers!...and back to the brewing table...a 2003 Youle waiting. :D



I generally ride mountain bikes because they are better able to deal with my weight. Once I have the money to spare though, I want to swap the offroad tires for road tires, it'll probably made road rides (which I mostly do) so much smoother.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Teaism » Jan 22nd, '14, 12:04

I was a mountain biker before going to road. It was too insane for me, too many crashes in the wilderness. I had a Trek OCLV and sold it. Now I keep a Giant with XTR, change the tyre to smooth tread. It was really nice to overtake a roadie with a MTB.

Haha, talking to you about bicycle really bring back all the nice memories.

Perhaps I should take it up more seriously again, but the traffic really scarce me. One of my cycling mate got killed on the road during training. I was supposed to join that ride but I was racing in another country. It was hard to think of it and eventually the passion just simmered off.

At least on tea tray, at most I only got burned by boiling water. Hmmm...
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Ursinos » Jan 22nd, '14, 12:57

Teaism wrote:I was a mountain biker before going to road. It was too insane for me, too many crashes in the wilderness. I had a Trek OCLV and sold it. Now I keep a Giant with XTR, change the tyre to smooth tread. It was really nice to overtake a roadie with a MTB.

Haha, talking to you about bicycle really bring back all the nice memories.

Perhaps I should take it up more seriously again, but the traffic really scarce me. One of my cycling mate got killed on the road during training. I was supposed to join that ride but I was racing in another country. It was hard to think of it and eventually the passion just simmered off.

At least on tea tray, at most I only got burned by boiling water. Hmmm...


I follow a lot of cycling activism, and yeah, I see all sorts of things like that. A lot of cities are starting to put in good infrastructure to protect cyclists, like barriered bike lanes. In town here, we have a nice trail that goes for about 15km along an old railway line (they pulled up the tracks and ties and paved it). I routinely used it when doing that commute to work every day, it was almost a straight shot up the trail for 10km to get to work. away from traffic and noise, it's great. Only have to worry about cars when you're crossing streets.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Teaism » Jan 22nd, '14, 19:55

You are lucky to have such facilities there. Over here the awareness has improved. The local government here is doing a great job by establishing proper cycling path and park connectors for cyclist. It is a different type of cycling compared to those adrenalin laced rides that I enjoyed. But at least, I can still have an alternative to ride in protected area and enjoy the breeze.

Well, it is really nice to talk to you about cycling.

Have a great day my friend.

Cheers!
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Ursinos » Jan 22nd, '14, 21:34

It's one of those growing things. There are so many people getting out of the car and getting onto a bike that governments are having to do SOMETHING about the safety concerns.

The sad part is that some cyclists out there do nothing to improve the sometimes hostile relationship between drivers and cyclists. I was witness to one incident this past autumn where a cyclist was deliberately weaving back and forth across an entire road, blocking traffic (he was going all of about 5km/h at the time). When the driver of the car behind him honked her horn at him, he stopped, got off his bike and approached her car, cursing and swearing about him having a right to the road. Since the law here is that a cyclist is to ride as close to the right hand side of the road as is "safely practicable", I yelled at the guy to learn the law and stop giving the rest of us a bad name.

The sad part is that this particular street has a bleeming bike lane!
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Chip » Jan 22nd, '14, 21:43

... now if only there were such protections and aids for cyclists everywhere we ride ... everywhere we want to ride. But the reality is protections and aids only account for a miniscule fraction of where cyclists travel. In fact, 0% of my riding is protected or aided (likely 99% rural to 1% urban).

Maybe in an idealistic society borne of cycling minded ...

Once we venture outside that protective bubble, we must be prepared to deal with the realities of cycling among powered vehicles weighing tons (while we measure our vehicles in pounds or kg).

And those behind the wheels must learn to ride "with us" as well. And learn to respect the rights of cyclists to "their roads." A lot has to be done in the realm of educating drivers ... it is truly amazing how many have a distorted belief that we do not have the right to be on "their roads."

Being one who was hit once by a car ... and in the other incident repeatedly and purposely hit by an ignorant pick-up truck driver, my "education" and perspectives have certainly changed.

Sadly, idiotic, renegade bicyclists often make our enjoyment of riding harder by turning drivers against cyclists in general, even when we are obeying the laws of the road.

However, I endeavor to ride predictably on "our" roads.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Chip » Jan 22nd, '14, 21:46

"Funny" but true and more than a bit off topic ...

... when Lance finally revealed the "truth" on Oprah, I personally noted a sharp increase in the "extreme close drive-bys" on desolate rural roads while riding alone. Pennsylvania has a 4 foot law.

And this was no longer limited to the red-neck in a pick-up truck ... suddenly it could be anyone including females. One guy driving a fancy, shiny, black Volvo almost forced me off the road ... unfortunately for him he had to stop in traffic ... as I pulled along side him, he yelled, "Get off the f**ken road, Lance!"

Fortunately this was mostly a short lived phenom.

It seemed that we had suddenly lost all the good will that ironically Lance had built up as a byproduct of his success and philanthropy. Everyone, including me, felt duped by the king of doping.
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