Cycle commuting


Completely off the Topic of Tea

Re: Cycle commuting

Postby brose » Jan 3rd, '14, 16:07

Truing will take some real time to learn and do a decent job. Make sure to really read up on it since it is really easy to mess it up. I gave up after having an overtightened nipple break through the rim and just bought a nice handmade wheel. I was referencing the brake pads which seem to work quite well. The key part is checking and balancing the spoke tension properly among all of the spokes. It will likely take several hours for one wheel without doing a hack job if you have not done this before.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby jayinhk » Jan 3rd, '14, 16:23

brose wrote:Truing will take some real time to learn and do a decent job. Make sure to really read up on it since it is really easy to mess it up. I gave up after having an overtightened nipple break through the rim and just bought a nice handmade wheel. I was referencing the brake pads which seem to work quite well. The key part is checking and balancing the spoke tension properly among all of the spokes. It will likely take several hours for one wheel without doing a hack job if you have not done this before.


Thanks, the fear of screwing it up is what's kept me away! No plans to try it just yet.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby MEversbergII » Jan 3rd, '14, 16:33

Ah yes, I probably should have included a warning. This is something that looking for a class might be useful for. It's probably THE maintenance thing I leave to the local bike shop.

M.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby jayinhk » Jan 3rd, '14, 16:43

MEversbergII wrote:Ah yes, I probably should have included a warning. This is something that looking for a class might be useful for. It's probably THE maintenance thing I leave to the local bike shop.

M.


I should probably get my wheels looked at: at my weight, things can start going awry pretty quickly!
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Chip » Jan 5th, '14, 12:25

MEversbergII wrote:Muahaha, not even today's windy ice storm kept me down! Only fell once, with 4 gallons of water (for tea) in the rear rack!

No damage. Need to invest in some snow tyres.

Now, I've been meaning to link this site here:

http://www.flyingpigeonproject.org

Combines China AND bikes. Win-win.

M.

The bigger they are, the harder they fall ... I guess the inverse is also true. I had a single fall on a road bike on an ice patch several years ago and laid in the middle of the road for several minutes (and I am not that big). Fortunately I was with a group and they helped me get back to the starting point almost 10 miles away.

But ice can cause you to land at a highly accelerated speed ... hard.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Chip » Jan 5th, '14, 12:28

Wheel trueing is a skill/art I would like to develop. I find it a fascinating, detail-oriented exercise.

If you want to do it right, perfect ... you really need a decent trueing stand. You can do an OK job with the wheel mounted on your bike until you can get it done right ...
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby Teaism » Jan 5th, '14, 12:42

Yes you really need all the proper tools to true them. I have a set of it but never dare to play with it. It is a skill that is hard to master. I always find the excuse that the mechanic is down the road.
But in case of emergency, when a wheel is distorted in the middle of nowhere, the wheel can be "trued" by dismantling the wheel and holding the wheel at both side horizontally and slowly knock them back to shape. It works for me before. :D
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby MEversbergII » Jan 5th, '14, 13:44

I'll get a truing set eventually. A new one is a little out of my budget for the moment, so maybe I'll comb e-bay for a used one soon.

Chip, the first time we had ice this year I'd gone out on my Trek, which features 23mm slicks. Wasn't ready for the ice at the end of my street! Fortunately, I'm the type (these days) that laughs it off.

One upside about going down on a sheet of ice is that it damages clothes / skin much less, since you're sliding against a smooth surface and not the freaking cheese grater that is the road. Still hard, though, and my knee's still a bit tender from the taxiway.

Looking at investing in a good roadster here soon. Gotta find the perfect frame size!

M.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby jayinhk » Jan 5th, '14, 14:05

While I'm waiting for a replacement crank arm, I bought a replacement set from China for $20. I'll have both arms switched over and have the bolts torqued down correctly and the chainring bolts properly screwed together. Alternatively I could just buy a torque wrench...

Got a Brooks saddle on the way too, but it looks like my bike won't get to meet the saddle until the middle of the month...I'm heading to the Philippines and Malaysia.

I've been thinking about getting a Flying Pigeon. Cheap enough, but storage space is the issue!
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby MEversbergII » Jan 6th, '14, 10:30

FP's aren't great, but they're supremely iconic. Considering buying myself one, but getting one from LA shipped across (completely unassembled) runs 250USD!

Did you get the Brooks shipped in from the UK, or is this a locally sold version?

M.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby jayinhk » Jan 6th, '14, 14:01

Actually, from Ben's Cycle in Milwaukee. :D

http://www.benscycle.com

They are doing a promo for new buyers and also sent me a coupon--I had to jump on it!

Switched over my left crank arm today and bought an 8mm allen key from a HK hardware store. I torqued down everything I could with my keys and wrench--I'm so paranoid about anything else getting messed up that I am going to check again after every ride!

I'll definitely pick up a torque wrench when I get back. They're only $30 or so on Taobao.

I'll be reunited with my fixed gear bike in a few days and riding on the streets of Borneo...should be fun! I might visit one of the oldest bike stores in Sabah and pick up a new seatpost (the one on my fixed bike scares me) and lights so I can ride at night. I forgot to take my lights off my bike. Ah well, I could really use an extra set!

I'm thinking about a fixed gear conversion for the Indian roadster I'll be picking up! Alternatively, I may just remove the chainguard, fenders and rack to make it look a little more 'street' since I'm going to get a LOT of looks on a milkman's bike. I do just want to ride it with all the doodads at first, though, since that's part of the experience!
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby MEversbergII » Jan 6th, '14, 14:53

Hah, the "doodads" are what I'm all about :p

When attaching the left crank, one detail - did you have to torque it to the left or right? It should tighten to the left (contrary to the norm). When I got back into cycling, I had a junky mountain bike that had "normal" threads on each side of the BB. That was a disaster.

M.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby jayinhk » Jan 6th, '14, 17:43

I torqued the left crank arm bolt to the right, but the left pedal torques to the left. I torqued both crank bolts down as hard as I could, but the key is only 4" or so long. Some people slip a pipe over the arm of the key so they can apply more force.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby MEversbergII » Jan 7th, '14, 09:48

I call it a "fixin' pipe" :p

Mine's a 3' long piece of PVC - loads of leverage.

-13 today when I left - still rode!

M.
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Re: Cycle commuting

Postby jayinhk » Jan 8th, '14, 02:15

You must have ice cubes for cojones! :lol:

I get really warm really quickly once I start moving, so when everybody else is shivering, I can strip down to a t-shirt in about ten minutes, and I'm STILL sweating! -13 is pretty darn crazy though!

Going to have to reassemble my fixed gear in Kota Kinabalu either tonight or tomorrow morning...that should be fun! I hope I can get the chain tension just right. I'll probably take it over to the bike shop out there to get a new seatpost and get some air in the tires...I forgot my pump! Depending on the price of parts, I may get a new set of 700c wheels and change out the bottom bracket too. The painted rims aren't really brake friendly, so I'm going to have to resist the pedals to brake. I do have a front brake on the bike, but it's next to worthless!
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