Is too much tea bad for you?


Completely off the Topic of Tea

Postby Space Samurai » May 17th, '07, 02:38

Okay, I'm tapping out. Here is how I did:

http://anotherteablog.blogspot.com/

And it is a link to my tea blog for those who were asking about it.
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Postby tomasini » May 17th, '07, 02:51

Good man =]

I had 32 (Two 16 ounce cups) ounces total of Dragonwell/Silverneedle...
16 (One 16 Ounce Cup) ounces of darjeeling
32 ounces (Two 16 ounce cups) of Six Summits Oolong
12 ounces of morrocan mint
32 ounces of lavendar white tea with jasmine pearls
so that's....134 ouncs?
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Postby xine » May 17th, '07, 10:14

OMGad...I think I would blow up if I had 134 oz of tea.


Let's try it! But not today.
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Postby tomasini » May 17th, '07, 12:35

CORRECTION sorry
Those 32's were closer to 28's i forgot that the cups were not perfectly topped off so i'll drop 2 ounces just to be safe...that puts me at...
so 122 ounces for me =]
...
...
...
and a lot of trips to the restroom :shock:
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Postby SnapshotCat » May 17th, '07, 12:47

That's definitely the only bad part about tea - the trips you need to make to the bathroom.
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Postby Tony » Jun 24th, '07, 06:53

Hmm, all I heard was that extreme doses of polyphenols may cause liver damage. There's an article on it at http://www.medicalnewstoday.com/medical ... wsid=38399

I don't know what it's worth though. It's only tested on mice, and I've heard it said more often that it's not really about tea, but about the supplements with polyphenols you can get, as they usually contain 50 times the amount that's in a cup of tea.

I suppose moderation is always a good thing :)
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Postby Chip » Jun 24th, '07, 12:51

...well...a good cup of tea is a good thing!!!

Anytime you overdose something that occurs in nature, it seems that it is likely to have dire effects.

I highly doubt if having tea several times a day is going to negatively affect 99.9% of the population unless someone is caffeine sensitive.

Perhaps this is why there is caffeine in tea, to tell us when enough is enough. Just a thought.
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Postby Elle » Jul 7th, '07, 01:52

To add some secondhand experience to this thread: a former roommate of mine (before I met her) had to have surgery on a kidney stone. The doctor told her and her mother that her iced tea habit was to blame - several glasses a day with no other liquids. If I recal, the word "polypheonols" was mentioned and then there's the caffine being a dieuretic besides. Edit: Not polyphenols but oxilates. Google tea and kidney stones and you'll find that tea is a major contributor to oxalate levels but no source recomends you cut back on it unless a doctor says you should. (Coffee, chocolate, spinich and strawberries were among the list as well as a few others.

I don't know what kind of iced tea she drank though it likely wasn't fancy - when I saw her drink hot tea it was usualy bagged jasmine or green. Might have been bottled tea, might not have been. But I think the key in this case was the "no other liquids" part. If she'd been drinking water as well it probably wouldn't have been a problem (and she would get bottled water delivered by the case to our appartment).

So the lesson is that tea shouldn't be the only part of your fluid intake - my 2 to 4 cup a day tea habit gets well supplimented with my favorite flavored seltzer water that I often drink by the liter bottle (Polar brand if you live in the northeast US...their flavors include vanilla and pomegranite). (IMO, drinks that count torward your water intake should be non-cafinated and minimaly sweetened if at all...so herbal tea counts!)

By the way...Alton Brown did *not* recomend distilled water...filtered was mentioned in the eposide but not distilled, and he recomends against it for other things like coffee.

Link to a transcript of the tea episode. Why yes I am a fan...
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Postby Mary R » Jul 7th, '07, 08:59

I've said it before and I'll say it again: Alton Brown is a god among men.

I did google "tea oxalate" and other various search terms as you suggested, and most of the paper abstracts and layman summations I read seem to indicate that even though black tea does contain a significant amount of oxalates, a lot of studies also indicate that tea, unlike other high oxalate foods, doesn't significantly contribute to increased urinary oxalate. The primary hypothesis seems to be that the great amount of water in each serving mitigates the oxalate effect. In short, tea is one of the foods that sort of waffles on and off the list of high oxalate foods.

It should also be noted that oolong, green, and white teas all have far less oxalate content than their black brethren. According to the 2001 paper in the Asia Pacific Journal of Clinical Nutrition, Oxalate Content and Calcium Binding Capacity of Tea and Herbal Teas by Charrier and Savage, a black tea infusion measured between 4.68 and 5.11 mg/g tea whereas green and oolong measured between .23 to 1.15 mg/g tea.

Of course, Charrier and Savage also note in their abstract that "the oxalate intake from the regular daily consumption of black teas is modest when compared to the amounts of soluble oxalate that can be found in common foods." And then last year in the Journal of Endourology Jeong, Kim, Kim and (must be a common name) Kim also concluded that our Snapple-touted friend EGCG in green tea actually had an inhibitory effect on kidney stone formation.

I'm not a doctor let alone a urologist, but the trend in literature seems to indicate that unless a person has a metabolic condition that makes them especially sensitive to oxalates, several cups of tea a day will most likely not result in kidney stones.
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Postby Chip » Jul 7th, '07, 09:57

Mary, did you stay at a Holiday Inn Express last night??? :lol:

Nice job and very informative. I had heard this years ago, but I had also heard about this with cranberry juice at the time.

Thanx for bringing this topic up, Elle and welcome to the forum.
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Postby Space Samurai » Jul 7th, '07, 12:28

Wow, its kinda like tea is the perfect beverage.
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