Mystery shu cake from Mannong


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Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby jan » Dec 8th, '11, 18:36

Hi,

I've got this cake from one of my trusted dealers in Germany and it is described as a 'Qi Zi Bing Cha' from Mannong, it is a Shu Pu and supposedly from 2007.

Has anyone else seen this cake? Any background info?

Thanks,
Jan
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby MarshalN » Dec 8th, '11, 23:48

Nope, this is basically a "white paper" cake. Small production from an unknown producer -- if it's shu, I'd avoid drinking it.
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby BioHorn » Dec 9th, '11, 02:49

MarshalN wrote:Nope, this is basically a "white paper" cake. Small production from an unknown producer -- if it's shu, I'd avoid drinking it.

+1
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby vacuithe » Dec 9th, '11, 03:59

Nope, this is basically a "white paper" cake. Small production from an unknown producer -- if it's shu, I'd avoid drinking it.


Not agree. Small production from unknown producer can be excellent teas. If you trust your dealer, if he can tell you where this pu come from, give it a try !
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby Drax » Dec 9th, '11, 08:24

MarshalN is recommending avoiding the tea if it's a shu because of sanitation concerns when composting the tea (with the assumption that smaller producers of tea run a higher risk of having unsanitary conditions when they composte the tea -- there's at least one or two threads around here where we've talked about this issue).
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby jan » Dec 9th, '11, 16:45

Thank for your answers, I didn't know that about shu. I do however trust my dealer as I forgot to mention this tea is also certified organic.

Thanks,
Jan
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby zhi zheng » Dec 10th, '11, 01:07

Drax wrote:MarshalN is recommending avoiding the tea if it's a shu because of sanitation concerns when composting the tea (with the assumption that smaller producers of tea run a higher risk of having unsanitary conditions when they composte the tea


+1

The other issue is that it's possible, but not common, for shu to be made from old tea trees (because of cost), so the validity of any organic certification becomes more critical.

Another factor is that it's widely believed (and seems to be true) that in order to make 'good' shu, with the right kind of bacteria etc. it requires large amounts of tea: variably said to be between 2 and 7 tonnes (metric), so it's less feasible for small producers to make. Also, using single origin maocha tends to produce a flat tasting tea. Common practice is to blend maocha from 3 to 4 different areas to give the tea some complexity.

What does it taste like? The proof of the pudding....
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby gingkoseto » Dec 10th, '11, 01:45

I agree with MarshalN that I would avoid buying such a tea too. But since you've already bought it, I wouldn't refuse to drink it. The worst case is it might not be tasty. Since you know the dealer and trust him, I don't think he would sell anything that kills, or bites. So I urge you to drink it anyway, and report back :D
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby jan » Dec 10th, '11, 01:51

zhi zheng wrote:The other issue is that it's possible, but not common, for shu to be made from old tea trees (because of cost), so the validity of any organic certification becomes more critical.


As far as I can tell the organic certification was made after the tea was prepared for export, e.g. the tea was tested at a later point for fertilization residue, rather than looking at the whole process.

zhi zheng wrote:Another factor is that it's widely believed (and seems to be true) that in order to make 'good' shu, with the right kind of bacteria etc. it requires large amounts of tea: variably said to be between 2 and 7 tonnes (metric), so it's less feasible for small producers to make. Also, using single origin maocha tends to produce a flat tasting tea. Common practice is to blend maocha from 3 to 4 different areas to give the tea some complexity.


What does it taste like? The proof of the pudding....


I'm not the most experienced pu-erh drinker. I'm just starting and trying tea from different sources (currently Red Lantern, Nada Cha and my local dealer). I will report if I come to a conclusion.
I've already tasted this cake (without the mission to report) and I think it has a relatively mild personality.

Also 'Tea Geschwendner' (which is absolutely a horrible source for green tea) is offering a loose Mannong Pu which is very similar in taste.

Thanks again for the information so far,
Jan
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Re: Mystery shu cake from Mannong

Postby jan » Dec 17th, '11, 14:46

I've tried this tea and it is nothing special. I actually really need to look for the pu taste. I've got a few aged shu tuo cha from the same seller which are extremely nice and a complete joy to drink, but this tea has some 'off' character which I can't really enjoy.

If someone is interested I have pictures of the tea & brew.

Jan
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