noob with questions


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

noob with questions

Postby ciphoto » May 28th, '12, 09:13

I’m a noob with a few questions. I’ve been read the forum here for a couple days, and other various interntet sources about pu-erh.

I ran across some small 2g touchas in a shop a year or so ago and really enjoy them. I now know they were probably ripe/cooked etc... and that this was most likely made from the sub par or low grade tea. So I really want to try some better grades and types.

So I will be ordering some samples to try. Which leads to my questions.

Since I’m in the US I’d like to order from a US importer or supplier to start with.

I’d like try so of the older vintage teas like at Essence of Tea in the UK is there a reputable US dealer who has some vintage teas, 70’s or at least pre 90’s? What are the chances that anything pre 80’s is what they say, considering the limited production and time etc?

My wife has let me know that her and my daughter where looking at doing something tea related for a fathers day, so are there any recommendations for some prepackaged sample grouping from a good vendor, or should tell them to get me a gift certificate or to just get me a Gaiwin or some other tea paraphernalia?

Next I see that many vendors have very young teas listed as pu-erh one or two years.
I’m wondering and haven’t ran across a comparison of a raw young tea like that and green tea or other un oxidized teas. I have read that the pu-erh is made from the broad leaf tea variety (assamese), but I’m curious as to what other think comparing the two varieties in non oxidized form. I’ll experiment myself too.

Also is there a good book resource about pu-erhs and the different regions/areas and producers that someone can recommend.

Thanks in advance, a tea noob…

john
ciphoto
 
Posts: 38
Joined: May 27th, '

Re: noob with questions

Postby teaisme » May 30th, '12, 15:07

ciphoto wrote:is there a reputable US dealer who has some vintage teas, 70’s or at least pre 90’s?


So far I haven't found one, better off just ordering from EOT for aged stuff is my current opinion. Actually I forgot, Houde does have a little stuff http://www.houdeasianart.com/index.php? ... x&cPath=38 though I have not tried any

ciphoto wrote:I ran across some small 2g touchas in a shop a year or so ago and really enjoy them. I now know they were probably ripe/cooked etc... and that this was most likely made from the sub par or low grade tea. So I really want to try some better grades and types.


If you really enjoyed them that's what is important. Maybe you would like to try different ripe to get different perspectives of that style of tea. It is very popular, and I would not call it inferior.
A good US vendor (that is not overpriced) for a good shou and younger sheng is going to be a lot easier to find then for aged sheng.
http://www.yunnansourcing.us/store/
http://www.puerhshop.com/

Something to ponder...http://teaguardian.com/health/Health_Sh ... uPuer.html

I know people who drink really young sheng all the time and they seem fine (I myself just ordered a bunch too), but one thing that is obvious to me is that matured sheng, and what is called ripe/cooked/shou is much more gentle on my body then really young sheng. Very quick multiple infusions do seem to tone a very young tea down significantly though.
User avatar
teaisme
 
Posts: 1390
Joined: May 27th, '

Re: noob with questions

Postby ciphoto » May 30th, '12, 23:05

Teaisme,
Thanks for the reply. I'm making me cart at yunnansourcing.us other vendors and putting samples of new green pu-erhs and some with a little age from 2011 to 2004, and doing the same with ripe young and old samples from 99 and hen some younger 5/6 years old.

I'm having to figure a strategy and budget so I can get a some experience with the different ages, areas etc.

I want to get some older pu-erh so I can contrast it with the newer. I know I should try and get similar areas, etc to make real comparisons. But that not be possible for now.

Again thanks.
ciphoto
 
Posts: 38
Joined: May 27th, '

Re: noob with questions

Postby TwoDog2 » May 31st, '12, 05:29

ciphoto wrote:
I’d like try so of the older vintage teas like at Essence of Tea in the UK is there a reputable US dealer who has some vintage teas, 70’s or at least pre 90’s? What are the chances that anything pre 80’s is what they say, considering the limited production and time etc?


My advice, avoid the old stuff (70's , 80's, and even 90's) for now.

When you first get your drivers license, does your dad buy you a Ferrari?

Start slow. I would try some stuff from 2001-2004. As a newcomer to puer, even stuff from a little later than that will give you a big understanding of what aging can do. Old doesn't necessarily mean good, either. Poke around some blogs and find some bargains or recommended teas that are "not young, not old". It will be like driving a 2006 Toyota Corolla. It's a nice car, maybe it doesn't have all the features you want, but you get a good idea of how to drive and what you want in a car. After you are comfortable driving, start renting out the BMWs and Mercedes. If you drive them now, a lot of their elegance will go unappreciated.
User avatar
TwoDog2
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 414
Joined: Mar 19th, '
Location: Frequently Moving Around

Re: noob with questions

Postby gasninja » May 31st, '12, 09:30

I would disagree with twodogg2. I would say that it is important to try a few aged examples. Young sheng and old sheng are two completely different teas as different as red and green tea. One may like aged sheng and not like young sheng and vise versa.
Another thing I would say is don't be so hung up on age I would prefer a decent 80s cake to an avg 70s loose leaf anyway. Also the 70s stuff your gonna find is likely gonna be bottom shelf unless you are paying a over a hundred dollars a pot. I would focus more on quality and storage than age.

in the US I would recommend themandarinstearoom.com. There three aged teas are about the best readily available online in the states right now with out taking a risk. This would be where I would go if i where you. HoudeAsianart.com has a 70s loose leaf that is decent but nothing mind blowing. I would avoid the 80s box tuocha. Banateacompany.com has gift packages and there quality of teas is generally pretty good they have some nice aged shou and some top shelf 90s old tree sheng. There 70s sheng brick is not a good example of a 70s sheng.
User avatar
gasninja
 
Posts: 609
Joined: Mar 10th, '
Location: Mount Zion

Re: noob with questions

Postby TwoDog2 » Jun 1st, '12, 03:30

gasninja wrote:I would say that it is important to try a few aged examples. Young sheng and old sheng are two completely different teas as different as red and green tea. One may like aged sheng and not like young sheng and vise versa...



I agree with you there, but i think a little age is enough to give a stark contrast to a beginner. Something from the late 90's or early 2000's ought to be enough. I think you made some good points, as far as price and availibility, (especially outside of Asia) 70's and 80's puer are going to either be prohibitively expensive or comparatively bad. I would personally take a great tea with 10 years of age, than a low quality tea with 20.
User avatar
TwoDog2
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 414
Joined: Mar 19th, '
Location: Frequently Moving Around

Re: noob with questions

Postby ciphoto » Jun 6th, '12, 04:56

Twodogs2, and gasninja, thanks for your suggestions and comments.

As for the raw pu-erh I'm wanting to make sure I sample ones with enough age difference that I can tell/taste a difference. I'll not get hung up on age as I'm pretty practical, and over all my taste and likes will drive me forward. I really don't see a lot reason to try very young raw samples, of course I could be wrong.

I do tend to like strong flavors in my teas and coffees

Eventually I'm sure I'll find some that like wine some I buy for day to day consumption, some just to enjoy every now and then, and some for special occasions...
ciphoto
 
Posts: 38
Joined: May 27th, '

Re: noob with questions

Postby TwoDog2 » Jun 6th, '12, 22:44

ciphoto wrote:I really don't see a lot reason to try very young raw samples, of course I could be wrong.


Probably just for the sake of comparison, try something young. You mentioned you like "strong" flavors. A lot of young raw puer is full of strong flavors, but it is really a personal preference, whether or not you like those characteristics.

If you are ordering something, let's say an Yiwu tea from 2003, maybe pick up a sample - Yunnan Sourcing is a good source for small samples - of an Yiwu from 2010 or 2011. That way, you will get a sense of what a tea from a similar region looks like after a little aging. If you could stay within the same manufacturer or tea recipe, all the better, as it allows you to make a fairly direct comparison.

I am interested to see what you choose to buy and what your thoughts are, so be sure to report back!
User avatar
TwoDog2
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 414
Joined: Mar 19th, '
Location: Frequently Moving Around


Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation