Spring vs Autumn Puerhs


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Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby AllanK » Mar 8th, '14, 19:33

I just put in an order for several bings of Yunnan Sourcing's new Autumn 2013 raw teas and was wondering, is there really a big difference between spring tea and autumn tea in what you can actually taste? Are there any reasons why sometimes autumn might be better than spring?
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby Exempt » Mar 8th, '14, 21:05

AllanK wrote:I just put in an order for several bings of Yunnan Sourcing's new Autumn 2013 raw teas and was wondering, is there really a big difference between spring tea and autumn tea in what you can actually taste? Are there any reasons why sometimes autumn might be better than spring?

Typically I've found that spring teas are thicker, meatier, more powerful, and better aging. Most of the autumnal teas that I have purchased are thinner, more floral, lighter, and more likely to become thin/weak with age. There are exceptions, of course, but this has been my general experience
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby mr mopu » Mar 8th, '14, 21:53

Exempt wrote:
AllanK wrote:I just put in an order for several bings of Yunnan Sourcing's new Autumn 2013 raw teas and was wondering, is there really a big difference between spring tea and autumn tea in what you can actually taste? Are there any reasons why sometimes autumn might be better than spring?

Typically I've found that spring teas are thicker, meatier, more powerful, and better aging. Most of the autumnal teas that I have purchased are thinner, more floral, lighter, and more likely to become thin/weak with age. There are exceptions, of course, but this has been my general experience

+1
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby AllanK » Mar 13th, '14, 12:18

Exempt wrote:
AllanK wrote:I just put in an order for several bings of Yunnan Sourcing's new Autumn 2013 raw teas and was wondering, is there really a big difference between spring tea and autumn tea in what you can actually taste? Are there any reasons why sometimes autumn might be better than spring?

Typically I've found that spring teas are thicker, meatier, more powerful, and better aging. Most of the autumnal teas that I have purchased are thinner, more floral, lighter, and more likely to become thin/weak with age. There are exceptions, of course, but this has been my general experience

When I asked Scott about this he said he sources all the Autumn YS teas himself and he always chooses powerful teas that should age well. For good measure, I added two spring cakes to my order as well. I should have it in 4-5 days.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby Teaism » Mar 13th, '14, 13:09

Given a choice, I would personally go for spring. I haven't had a single piece of autumn at all in my collection, but tried it before in many occasions. Since you have ordered spring and autumn, you should brew them both together to compare.

Cheers! :D
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby Exempt » Mar 13th, '14, 14:32

AllanK wrote:
Exempt wrote:
AllanK wrote:I just put in an order for several bings of Yunnan Sourcing's new Autumn 2013 raw teas and was wondering, is there really a big difference between spring tea and autumn tea in what you can actually taste? Are there any reasons why sometimes autumn might be better than spring?

Typically I've found that spring teas are thicker, meatier, more powerful, and better aging. Most of the autumnal teas that I have purchased are thinner, more floral, lighter, and more likely to become thin/weak with age. There are exceptions, of course, but this has been my general experience

When I asked Scott about this he said he sources all the Autumn YS teas himself and he always chooses powerful teas that should age well. For good measure, I added two spring cakes to my order as well. I should have it in 4-5 days.

I thoroughly enjoy yunnansourcing teas and they account for a large portion of space in my pumicer but you also need to evaluate your source. He is obviously going to upwell all of his teas. Also, even if he chose the most powerful autumnal teas available to him, they will still not be as strong or thick as spring teas
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby bagua7 » Mar 15th, '14, 03:22

I quite liked the 2011 YS Mang Fei autumn version, very lively and spicy...who knows what the spring harvest would be like...maybe a lot mre intense. But generally speaking, I also stick to spring tea.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby Tead Off » Mar 15th, '14, 03:26

bagua7 wrote:I quite liked the 2011 YS Mang Fei autumn version, very lively and spicy...who knows what the spring harvest would be like...maybe a lot mre intense. But generally speaking, I also stick to spring tea.

I've had both Spring and Autumn harvest from Mangfei, 2011. Both good. I bought the spring but not YS. Mine is from Mengdai. I like the tea quite a bit.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby hop_goblin » May 9th, '14, 16:51

Spring leaves are always desired. They will contain more tannins and the oomph needed for a complex brew which will also aid in its aging.

Autumn leaves are less pungent and masculine but they are still a wonderful addition to a collection. A good way to tell if your leaves are autumn other than labeling. Autumn leaves will generally be larger than your spring fare.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby AllanK » May 10th, '14, 00:34

hop_goblin wrote:Spring leaves are always desired. They will contain more tannins and the oomph needed for a complex brew which will also aid in its aging.

Autumn leaves are less pungent and masculine but they are still a wonderful addition to a collection. A good way to tell if your leaves are autumn other than labeling. Autumn leaves will generally be larger than your spring fare.

If Autumn leaves are generally larger they should have less caffeine. Larger tea leaves have less caffeine. Good info.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby William » May 10th, '14, 04:23

AllanK wrote:
hop_goblin wrote:Spring leaves are always desired. They will contain more tannins and the oomph needed for a complex brew which will also aid in its aging.

Autumn leaves are less pungent and masculine but they are still a wonderful addition to a collection. A good way to tell if your leaves are autumn other than labeling. Autumn leaves will generally be larger than your spring fare.

If Autumn leaves are generally larger they should have less caffeine. Larger tea leaves have less caffeine. Good info.


In my opinion, large leaves only indicates that they were collected at the end of the season and / or fertilizers were applied to the plant.
Caffeine, mostly depends from the varietal and probably, other factors of which I am not aware of.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby Tead Off » May 10th, '14, 06:02

William wrote:
AllanK wrote:
hop_goblin wrote:Spring leaves are always desired. They will contain more tannins and the oomph needed for a complex brew which will also aid in its aging.

Autumn leaves are less pungent and masculine but they are still a wonderful addition to a collection. A good way to tell if your leaves are autumn other than labeling. Autumn leaves will generally be larger than your spring fare.

If Autumn leaves are generally larger they should have less caffeine. Larger tea leaves have less caffeine. Good info.


In my opinion, large leaves only indicates that they were collected at the end of the season and / or fertilizers were applied to the plant.
Caffeine, mostly depends from the varietal and probably, other factors of which I am not aware of.

Aren't there large leaf varieties, da ye, that are picked in Spring? I've seen many spring pickings with some enormous leaves in them.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby William » May 10th, '14, 08:35

Tead Off wrote:
William wrote:
AllanK wrote:
hop_goblin wrote:Spring leaves are always desired. They will contain more tannins and the oomph needed for a complex brew which will also aid in its aging.

Autumn leaves are less pungent and masculine but they are still a wonderful addition to a collection. A good way to tell if your leaves are autumn other than labeling. Autumn leaves will generally be larger than your spring fare.

If Autumn leaves are generally larger they should have less caffeine. Larger tea leaves have less caffeine. Good info.


In my opinion, large leaves only indicates that they were collected at the end of the season and / or fertilizers were applied to the plant.
Caffeine, mostly depends from the varietal and probably, other factors of which I am not aware of.

Aren't there large leaf varieties, da ye, that are picked in Spring? I've seen many spring pickings with some enormous leaves in them.


You are right, there are varietal like Da Ye and a few others with bigger leaves. Usually these varietals, if grown with bio-dynamic/natural farming, have leaves of the size of Red Jade from Taiwan, that are usually not so small.
If these leaves are really too big, I would tend to be more cautious.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby Tead Off » May 10th, '14, 08:48

I think some of the members here who are in the field in Xishuangbanna and putting together cakes for their own business can shed 'factual' light on this subject.
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Re: Spring vs Autumn Puerhs

Postby William » May 10th, '14, 08:58

Tead Off wrote:I think some of the members here who are in the field in Xishuangbanna and putting together cakes for their own business can shed 'factual' light on this subject.


+1
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