2008 Menghai "Five Colored Peacock" Raw Pu-erh tea


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Postby thanks » Nov 1st, '08, 12:06

On my most recent order from Scott I asked him if it were possible to sell me a sampler set of the 08 Peacock series. Good thing he thought it was a good idea, and I added it to my order so I will be doing an actual review soon of the whole set. Here's the link, http://cgi.ebay.com/2008-Menghai-Five-C ... m153.l1262
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Postby Jeremy » Nov 1st, '08, 21:27

thanks wrote:On my most recent order from Scott I asked him if it were possible to sell me a sampler set of the 08 Peacock series. Good thing he thought it was a good idea, and I added it to my order so I will be doing an actual review soon of the whole set. Here's the link, http://cgi.ebay.com/2008-Menghai-Five-C ... m153.l1262


This is awesome, I am ordering right now.

:lol:
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Postby thanks » Nov 18th, '08, 20:27

Okay, I've gotten around to tasting a couple of the mountains now. I have already posted my quick notes of the Bada sheng elsewhere in the forum
http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php?t=7045

Yesterday I finally finished a second session with the Menghai Peacock of Nannuo. I'm also going to post some slightly more detailed notes in my new blog, located here; http://teajournaling.blogspot.com/


I was expecting some good things from this tea. Nannuo usually provides some delicious leaf. The short answer of things is yes, that this is indeed good tea worth your money. The smell of the wet leaves is great, so far a trait shared among three of the five Peacocks that I've tried so far. Very impressive. The leaf quality is obviously great plantation material, and the single estate claims are very believable, especially in the case of the Bada as it proved to be too boring.

The first two infusions of this tea were light, both in flavor and liquor color. Pale, almost that light pinkish Yiwu style, but not quite. Third infusion on starts to show a healthier yellow, which continues the rest of the session pretty consistently. The flavor is low, bass salty "fern-like" (term borrowed from Hobbes, but never thought I'd experience it myself), and remains pretty consistent throughout. The real draw of this tea, however is the mouthfeel. It starts off fairly medium bodied, but later provides a fairly thick brew that coats your mouth. When taking a sip of any infusion, the same few things happen, but in varying degrees which can often be mistaken for complexity in flavor. These things are the huigan, which comes on fast and strong, then fades quickly to a pleasant bitterness at the back of the throat, while at the same time the sides of the back of your mouth start to experience a (usually) fairly strong astringency.

This tea won't win any awards on big flavor (although what it does have is pleasant, fascinating, and keeps drawing me in), but what it lacks in flavor it certainly makes up for in every other category. I couldn't even begin to imagine how delightful this will probably be in a few years. A fun tea to sample.[/img]
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