tasting for the inexperienced


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Postby wyardley » Oct 21st, '08, 00:14

Cinnabar Red wrote:
TomVerlain wrote:Great advice!!! I'll take out a loan, if I can find one, and order the the "88 Cake" from The Best Tea House in Hong Kong" At current exchange rates Its a bargain at 341.72 U.S. :D


The 88 qing bing isn't anywhere near that cheap (especially from them) now. If you're talking about the one listed on their site at around $341, it's for 100g, and I think it's an old price anyway. I think the official price for a full cake if you buy it from them is between $1200 and $1500, or maybe more now. If you're curious, you can try the Richmond branch, who have it in stock.
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Postby Cinnabar Red » Oct 21st, '08, 09:41

Thanks for the price and weight correction. With the liquidity crisis, I will definately not be able to get a loan :(
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Postby Jeremy » Oct 23rd, '08, 13:04

I have also faced this dilemma. I have the disposable income to spend on expensive tea, but I have noticed that when you have tried not so good tea first you REALLY appreciate better vintages.

What I did was take like $100 and order as many samples from puerh shop that I could. Then over the course of a month or two , I would try them all day every day.

Then I noted what region and factory the ones that interested me. Then I started looking for the high priced relatives of these cakes.

I also had someone show me how to taste the tea. I partly agree with some of what was said. On your own you will not be able to understand the nuances of a very very rare / old tea. But I also see nothing wrong with buying some mid level , nice teas to experiment with.

I basically do alot of samples, so that I can still pay my rent :-)

J
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Re: tasting for the inexperienced

Postby hop_goblin » Oct 23rd, '08, 13:07

Salsero wrote:
heavydoom wrote: he is the reigning king of pu and i am sure he won't mind having another tea drinker joining him on the weekend
The first statement is fabrication (Heavy poking me in my short ribs). I won't deny being the loudest, however, and there is a certain nobility to that! The second statement is, of course, always true. But I have no idea how I would introduce someone to pu. I've always been a little afraid to encourage new people, it's such a problematic part of the tea world.


Dangit Sal, when was I de-throned! :lol:
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Postby VinceBLG » Oct 27th, '08, 14:36

Lots of good info in this thread and lots of different questions about tasting.

I think a very important part of tasting is to have good brewing ratio and brewing vessels. Yixing pots or gaiwan and a fine mesh strainer. Learn about using the yixing pot for brewing puerh.

Use about 1 gram per 50ml of water. For example, my yixing pot is about 7 ounces, which is roughly 200ml so I use about 4 grams of tea in the pot. I have a small, very inexpensive digital scale so I know my ratio is consistent and correct. Hard to taste and compare if you brew different ratios of tea to water each time.

Slurp and get some air into your mouth when tasting, this opens up the bouquet and lets your nose get involved which is where most of our tasting really happens. If you don't already know something about wine tasting I'd recommend learning about that because it applies to tasting just about anything.
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Postby shogun89 » Oct 27th, '08, 15:22

VinceBLG wrote:Lots of good info in this thread and lots of different questions about tasting.

I think a very important part of tasting is to have good brewing ratio and brewing vessels. Yixing pots or gaiwan and a fine mesh strainer. Learn about using the yixing pot for brewing puerh.

Use about 1 gram per 50ml of water. For example, my yixing pot is about 7 ounces, which is roughly 200ml so I use about 4 grams of tea in the pot. I have a small, very inexpensive digital scale so I know my ratio is consistent and correct. Hard to taste and compare if you brew different ratios of tea to water each time.

Slurp and get some air into your mouth when tasting, this opens up the bouquet and lets your nose get involved which is where most of our tasting really happens. If you don't already know something about wine tasting I'd recommend learning about that because it applies to tasting just about anything.


Vince; I just noticed that your avatar looks very much like the pot I have from YSLLC. Heres a pic of mine, is it the same? Also as your leave ratio is a generally good ratio I actually use 5-6 grams for my 125 ml. yixing and get very good results. Not saying this way is right but just another way for beginners to try.

Image
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