Official Pu of the day


One of the intentionally aged teas, Pu-Erh has a loyal following.

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Tead Off » Apr 25th, '15, 03:33

2009 Spring Yiwu from Tea Urchin. Very nice tea that is still getting better after 6 years.
Seong il 100ml gaiwan, 2009 Yiwu.jpg
Seong il 100ml gaiwan, 2009 Yiwu.jpg (118.69 KiB) Viewed 34 times
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3810
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby mam2431 » Apr 24th, '15, 15:20

Having fun today with Yunnan Sourcing’s 2009 Lao Ban Zhang Premium sheng. This is a very interesting selection from YS recommended by a few whose opinions I value. Reportedly a special production by the Mengku Tea Factory and according to YS, the tea is 100% Ban Zhang Wild Ancient Arbor. The leaves of the cake appear to be clean, thick and stout. Bright and clear tea liquor. Floral-fruity scent on top of a smooth woody base which is long lasting and powerful. The sip is full and complex yet strongly sweet. There is a pleasant bitterness but this quickly dissipates then a full, delicious, sweet taste dominates and remains in the mouth for quite some time. Nice mouth feel – tongue and mouth tingle after just a few small sips. Good chaqi which begins to come forward after the first cup and builds over several infusions. Nice tea!
mam2431
 
Posts: 18
Joined: Jul 22nd, '

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby William » Apr 24th, '15, 12:27

Just finished some wild DXS from the 2014 harvest.
After the first 2/3 brews, the tea became oily and thick on the tongue, maintaining a nice balance between aftertaste's length and body's thickness.

Surely a nice surprise (since I opened the untouched bag few minutes before). :)
User avatar
William
 
Posts: 623
Joined: Jul 10th, '
Location: Italy.

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Drax » Apr 23rd, '15, 12:23

kyarazen wrote:there are different aroma wheels for different cultures.. the chinese one is different from the european one..


Interesting! A good example of why it's nice to have these conversations every once in awhile... :D
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2700
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Drax » Apr 23rd, '15, 12:21

AdmiralKelvinator wrote:For the record, I think you can have a tea that has very rich and complex top notes, and it can also have a deeper, "rounder" bitterness as well.


Absolutely! Just like you can have a bassoon and a flute playing simultaneously. Sometimes the analogies really do work well... :D
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2700
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby kyarazen » Apr 23rd, '15, 11:07

Drax wrote:Paxl -- it's a way to think about the flavor landscape as a sound/music landscape. A similar conversion happens when people say 'darker' and 'brighter'... we're trying to convert taste into other senses that are perhaps a bit easier to describe.

There's actually no guarantee that two people will convert the same flavor profile in the same way. And come to think of it, I've never tried to backward convert -- that is, if a tea makes me think of 'low notes,' I'm not sure I've identified what is actually in the taste that makes me think of it that way. Maybe somebody else can throw out some ideas (different topic/thread, perhaps?) -- is a richer mouthfeel lower in tone? Is bitterness higher? Hm.

Hope that helps a little... :D



its a fun topic :P dabbling a wee bit into perfumery i realized that there are different aroma wheels for different cultures.. the chinese one is different from the european one..
User avatar
kyarazen
 
Posts: 1033
Joined: Sep 2nd, '1
Location: in your tea closet

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Admiralkelvinat... » Apr 23rd, '15, 10:37

Drax wrote:Paxl -- it's a way to think about the flavor landscape as a sound/music landscape. A similar conversion happens when people say 'darker' and 'brighter'... we're trying to convert taste into other senses that are perhaps a bit easier to describe.

There's actually no guarantee that two people will convert the same flavor profile in the same way. And come to think of it, I've never tried to backward convert -- that is, if a tea makes me think of 'low notes,' I'm not sure I've identified what is actually in the taste that makes me think of it that way. Maybe somebody else can throw out some ideas (different topic/thread, perhaps?) -- is a richer mouthfeel lower in tone? Is bitterness higher? Hm.

Hope that helps a little... :D



indeed it's an analogy to musical timbre, and although in a sense all comparisons are imperfect by nature, coming from a musical background its the first frame of reference I reach for.

I guess what I mean by "high register" is actually more temporal in nature, its the flavors that hit the palate first, in that there's no delay between the sip and the first impressions. Using a stainless kettle, the bitterness of the Banzhang hits quickly and it's somewhat "sharp" (again an imperfect analogy but hey). The clay mutes the bitterness, rounds it out and gives the tea a heavier, mouth-filling sensation that feels more "bassy" to me. For me, a good tea has a flavor that morphs as you hold it in your mouth, from high to low and eventually the finish and huigan or what have you.

For the record, I think you can have a tea that has very rich and complex top notes, and it can also have a deeper, "rounder" bitterness as well.
Admiralkelvinat...
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Nov 12th, '
Location: Japan

Official Pu of the day

Postby bonescwa » Apr 23rd, '15, 10:18

Drax wrote:Paxl -- it's a way to think about the flavor landscape as a sound/music landscape. A similar conversion happens when people say 'darker' and 'brighter'... we're trying to convert taste into other senses that are perhaps a bit easier to describe.

There's actually no guarantee that two people will convert the same flavor profile in the same way. And come to think of it, I've never tried to backward convert -- that is, if a tea makes me think of 'low notes,' I'm not sure I've identified what is actually in the taste that makes me think of it that way. Maybe somebody else can throw out some ideas (different topic/thread, perhaps?) -- is a richer mouthfeel lower in tone? Is bitterness higher? Hm.

Hope that helps a little... :D

It would be interesting to know if the molecules that create 'heavier' aroma/flavor are actually heavier and less volatile than those that create 'bright' aromas/flavors. It would make sense, floral and citrus aromas are there to be sensed by pollinators.
bonescwa
 
Posts: 374
Joined: Feb 3rd, '1

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby gasninja » Apr 23rd, '15, 09:18

2001 Simao Gu Puer Bangwei from the six Famous tea Mtns set. I. Remember this set as being about 50/50 good and so so when I first got samples. This Bangwei is a really great tea though it tastes older than it is. Strong cha qi check cooling aftertaste check huigan check. There is,even a good amount of granny face powder normally found in older tea. As I am thinking about this I remember that Bangwei has a giant 1700 +year , old mother tree right near/in the village. I ponder how puer was not this exhaulted thing in 2001 but just common tea. If I was a farmer looking for tea Would I go hiking through the junggle to find the leaf or would I climb the giant tea tree in my back yard. Hmmmmm :D


But it could as easily be taidi cha from
from Hunan. :wink:
User avatar
gasninja
 
Posts: 632
Joined: Mar 10th, '
Location: on top of a mountain.

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Drax » Apr 23rd, '15, 08:51

Paxl -- it's a way to think about the flavor landscape as a sound/music landscape. A similar conversion happens when people say 'darker' and 'brighter'... we're trying to convert taste into other senses that are perhaps a bit easier to describe.

There's actually no guarantee that two people will convert the same flavor profile in the same way. And come to think of it, I've never tried to backward convert -- that is, if a tea makes me think of 'low notes,' I'm not sure I've identified what is actually in the taste that makes me think of it that way. Maybe somebody else can throw out some ideas (different topic/thread, perhaps?) -- is a richer mouthfeel lower in tone? Is bitterness higher? Hm.

Hope that helps a little... :D
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2700
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby paxl13 » Apr 23rd, '15, 08:20

Anyone can point me out to what a 'bass' and 'high' flavor not mean? I think I missed the memo!

Cheers!
User avatar
paxl13
 
Posts: 41
Joined: Jan 14th, '

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Admiralkelvinat... » Apr 23rd, '15, 04:15

Sitting down with a BanZhang tea I picked up at Wistaria a few months ago. I posted a few pages back about this tea, how I was curiously disappointed with how thin and bitter it was compared to when I had tried it in the teahouse. But today, after much wrangling and experimenting I think I may have found a solution.

Image

Instead of my normal stainless kettle, using a stoneware kettle to heat the water significantly changed the character of the tea for the better: smoothing off the bitterness that develops in the high register and significantly boosting the bottom end, the "bass" if you will of the flavor profile. The tea has much more body now and rings in the mouth for a long time. It's not a fancy purion kettle or anything, but even so the difference is quite noticeable.

I don't think that clay necessarily improves every variety of tea (since it tends to mute high notes which are otherwise desirable), but I think at least for bitter bulang teas the clay is a good fit.
Admiralkelvinat...
 
Posts: 29
Joined: Nov 12th, '
Location: Japan

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Tead Off » Apr 23rd, '15, 03:42

shah82 wrote:Eeeehh, Tead Off, Gasninja, as well as me, has an expensive taste in puerh. Hitting it hard means committing multiple thousands in one go.

Even so, this presumes you hit *several* teas hard. If you didn't, then that day when you have to ration inevitably arrives.

This wisdom is for the benefit of the younger drinkers who have 20-40 years of patience, or life expectancy, to 'raise' their cakes and have a lifetime supply of excellent teas.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3810
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby shah82 » Apr 23rd, '15, 02:26

Eeeehh, Tead Off, Gasninja, as well as me, has an expensive taste in puerh. Hitting it hard means committing multiple thousands in one go.

Even so, this presumes you hit *several* teas hard. If you didn't, then that day when you have to ration inevitably arrives.
shah82
 
Posts: 1205
Joined: May 9th, '0

Re: Official Pu of the day

Postby Tead Off » Apr 22nd, '15, 23:42

gasninja wrote: This cake makes me regret the my earlier tendency of stamp collecting puerh. ( purchasing a cake or two of as many different quality teas as I could. ) While it is awesome having a bunch of different good teas to try. I pay big tuition bill as well. Now I have to ration almost every tea that I truly enjoy. When I could have just spent my tea loot on a multiple cakes of the really good stuff and be much happier now.

That is big wisdom speaking, fellow pu-heads!! :D :D :D
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3810
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation