Ti Kuan Yin issue

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Postby MarshalN » Mar 15th, '06, 18:06

Hmmm, having just joined this site and reading your replies, illium, I need to contact you as my tea supplier in the US :)

I think one thing to add though is that TieGuanYin, at least from what I have learned from my many hours spent in teahouses in Hong Kong, is that they ideally should have a lingering "aftertaste" that ordinary oolongs, especially Taiwanese oolongs, wouldn't have. Lots of people would try to sell you Taiwanese "TieGuanYin", but the real deal really should only come from Fujian.

User avatar MarshalN
Posts: 2109
Joined: Mar 15, '06
Contact MarshalN:

Postby Phyll » Mar 18th, '06, 12:06

MarshalN wrote:but the real deal really should only come from Fujian.


From Anxi in Fuchien (Fujian) province. The real deal is WONDERFUL! The wrong deal is just AWFUL! Once I didn't really quite understand the big deal about tiekuanyin either, until a store owner whipped up his secret stash of the recently harvested Anxi tiekuanyin...man, it was awesome! There is this strong floral bouquet, buttery smell, spring grass, forest floor, eucalyptus, etc...goes down easy with an aftertaste that lingers forever.

User avatar Phyll
Posts: 86
Joined: Feb 24, '06
Location: Los Angeles

Postby MarshalN » Mar 19th, '06, 22:57

Yess, and it's the aftertaste that makes a tieguanyin the real deal. Taiwan teas never have that no matter how fragrant it initially is. I am drinking some stuff that my girlfriend sent me from Beijing, coming from Taiwan. It's probably a autumn pick tieguanyin, and it's quite nice although a little sour.

User avatar MarshalN
Posts: 2109
Joined: Mar 15, '06
Contact MarshalN:

Postby javyn » Mar 20th, '06, 20:53

Would "Anxi Benshan Oolong" be the same thing as Anxi Tikwanyin?

User avatar javyn
Posts: 54
Joined: Jan 16, '06
Contact javyn:

Postby MarshalN » Mar 22nd, '06, 21:16

Well.... it could be, it could not. You can never really tell from a tea's name on any vendor's site/shop. You gotta taste it...

User avatar MarshalN
Posts: 2109
Joined: Mar 15, '06
Contact MarshalN:

Postby rabbit » Mar 22nd, '06, 21:41

Well I just tried ti kuan yin for the first time the other day, and if I were to give the tea a SMELL, I'd say it was kinda buttery smelling... like a pastry of some kind, but tasted NOTHING like it smelled, it was very vegital and "green" as you say, at first I thought I might have not steeped it long enough, so I tried longer and it made it bitter, so I guess maybe that's just what it's supposed to taste like, it's OK I guess but I don't really like it that much.

User avatar rabbit
Posts: 713
Joined: Feb 14, '06
Location: A briar patch.

Postby MarshalN » Mar 22nd, '06, 23:42

The variety in tieguanyin is endless, actually. There is, crudely speaking, the dark roast and the light roast, and they taste very different. The grades are also vastly different. Where did you get this particular rendition?

User avatar MarshalN
Posts: 2109
Joined: Mar 15, '06
Contact MarshalN:

better iced

Postby jogrebe » Apr 4th, '06, 13:07

I've found that ti kuan yin is a lot better cold than hot in my opinion, but with that being said I won't be reordering when its used up.

User avatar jogrebe
Posts: 478
Joined: Jun 15, '05
Location: Norristown, PA
Contact jogrebe:

Postby Warden Andy » Apr 4th, '06, 15:06

Does anyone know if the Tie Guan Yin from Adagio is from Anxi? I see that it says it is from Fujian, but no specifics.

However, whether it's from Anxi or not, it's still really good.

User avatar Warden Andy
Posts: 221
Joined: Feb 12, '06
Contact Warden Andy:

Postby yresim » Apr 5th, '06, 10:46

MarshalN wrote:The variety in tieguanyin is endless, actually. There is, crudely speaking, the dark roast and the light roast, and they taste very different. The grades are also vastly different. Where did you get this particular rendition?

It is Adagio's Ti Kuan Yin Trio.

~Yresim~

User avatar yresim
Posts: 139
Joined: Feb 19, '06
Location: San Jose, CA
Contact yresim:

Postby nmrfarm » May 13th, '08, 12:54

To cut the long story short, what yresim described is a very accurate view the modern chinese TGYs.

Yet the "highly oxidized", "butterscotch, wood, mushroom, earth, brandy" features yresim was looking are the signatures of traditional TGYs, similar to Wuyi oolongs.

"Nong Xiang " (thick/strong aroma/flagrance in meaning) versions of the mordern chinese TGYs are still much lighter oxidized/roasted then the traditional Chinese TGYs.

If one want to see what a traditional TGY is, the Taiwan TGYs todays offers a shadow of it. Still lighter in oxidation and roasting, it midway between a traditional Chinese TGY and the modern ones.


A few example of Taiwanese TGYs below

Roasted
Image

Before Roasting
Image

infused leafs and tea before roasting

Image

Image

User avatar nmrfarm
Posts: 8
Joined: Jan 23, '08

Postby Victoria » May 13th, '08, 13:08

Yum!

User avatar Victoria
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 08, '08
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Southern CA
Contact Victoria:

Postby Beidao » May 25th, '08, 08:14

The "View new posts" messed up and showed postings very far back, but I'm glad 'cause that let me read this thread. And I was drinking a TKY much like the one decribed here while reading. Now I know SO much more about it.

Cooool :)

User avatar Beidao
Posts: 524
Joined: Apr 10, '08
Location: Sweden
Contact Beidao:

Postby Victoria » May 25th, '08, 16:29

Beidao wrote:The "View new posts" messed up and showed postings very far back, but I'm glad 'cause that let me read this thread. And I was drinking a TKY much like the one decribed here while reading. Now I know SO much more about it.

Cooool :)


LOL, is that why we were all responding to a two year old post!

TKY still rules!
:)

User avatar Victoria
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 08, '08
Scrolling: scrolling
Location: Southern CA
Contact Victoria:

Postby Beidao » May 26th, '08, 06:05

Oops, I didn't even notice that the original post was 2 years old. Yeah, TKY will still rule 2010. And 2100. But then I'm not around to drink it anymore :cry:

Well, I might be if you believe everything health freaks say about tea :P

User avatar Beidao
Posts: 524
Joined: Apr 10, '08
Location: Sweden
Contact Beidao:


Today's Poll



Community

In total there are 2 users online :: 1 registered, 0 hidden and 1 guest