90's FengHuang Dancong?


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tea4Todd » Sep 10th, '10, 20:10

I'm still new to the oolong game, and was wondering about purchasing this. It says that proper gongfu method is required...would this be too advanced for me? I'm attracted to it for the price..19 dollars for the 2 oz is a decent deal. Can anyone tell me anything about this tea? Steeping recommendations? Flavors? etc.
User avatar
Tea4Todd
 
Posts: 170
Joined: Sep 5th, '1
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby debunix » Sep 10th, '10, 20:19

From what source?

Fenghuang is not a very specific term to identify a particular Phoenix mountain oolong.
User avatar
debunix
 
Posts: 5086
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tea4Todd » Sep 10th, '10, 20:21

debunix wrote:From what source?

Fenghuang is not a very specific term to identify a particular Phoenix mountain oolong.



errr I meant to post the link, guess I forgot. Here it is
http://www.houdeasianart.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&products_id=1012
User avatar
Tea4Todd
 
Posts: 170
Joined: Sep 5th, '1
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tea4Todd » Sep 10th, '10, 20:22

it says FengHuang, Guang Dong, China if that helps at all. I have no knowledge of tea regions other than the very, very basics
User avatar
Tea4Todd
 
Posts: 170
Joined: Sep 5th, '1
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby debunix » Sep 10th, '10, 22:17

No experience iwth that one, but it looks intriguing. I'd be happy to add a little of that to my next order from them.

The "short steeping" likely means it is bitter if infused at high leaf-to-water ratios, and like a lot of Dan Cong, needs some care iwth the handling to avoid that.

But given my generally excellent experience iwth HouDe and Dan Congs, I'd be happy to try it despite my bitterphobia, but I would start with very low leaf-to-water ratio (about 1g/2 oz gaiwan), lower temp water (180-185 degrees), and short steeps (10 seconds first), and move up from there in the intensity of the brewing.
User avatar
debunix
 
Posts: 5086
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tea4Todd » Sep 10th, '10, 22:49

Debunix, I have a 3.4 oz gaiwan on the way, how much should I add? Keep in mind, I have no scale, so weighing the leaves is not something I can readily do at the moment. I have been relying on measuring spoons, or eyeballing it..so for instance...since I will have a 100 ml Gaiwan, could you give me an approximation on either how much of the bottom of the Gaiwan to cover with leaf, or how many spoons of measurement of leaf to add? That would help a lot.
User avatar
Tea4Todd
 
Posts: 170
Joined: Sep 5th, '1
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tead Off » Sep 11th, '10, 00:53

Tea4Todd wrote:Debunix, I have a 3.4 oz gaiwan on the way, how much should I add? Keep in mind, I have no scale, so weighing the leaves is not something I can readily do at the moment. I have been relying on measuring spoons, or eyeballing it..so for instance...since I will have a 100 ml Gaiwan, could you give me an approximation on either how much of the bottom of the Gaiwan to cover with leaf, or how many spoons of measurement of leaf to add? That would help a lot.


If you are new to DC, I would suggest passing on this in favor of something more mainstream and closer to the DC flavor profile of newer teas. The description is also warning you of inherent bitterness if not handled properly. This might be an easy way to develop an aversion to DC.

Whatever vessel you use, try starting with 1/3 of it filled with loose tea. Use boiled water that has been left to cool for a couple of minutes in the kettle and then do short infusions and adjust from there. It's pretty simple.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3485
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tea4Todd » Sep 11th, '10, 01:00

Tead Off wrote:If you are new to DC, I would suggest passing on this in favor of something more mainstream and closer to the DC flavor profile of newer teas. The description is also warning you of inherent bitterness if not handled properly. This might be an easy way to develop an aversion to DC.

Whatever vessel you use, try starting with 1/3 of it filled with loose tea. Use boiled water that has been left to cool for a couple of minutes in the kettle and then do short infusions and adjust from there. It's pretty simple.



Good advice. Could you recommend something in the DC style that won't have the danger of bitterness? I'm starting to see the tea:gaiwan ratio...it's interesting, I'll just have to practice more.
User avatar
Tea4Todd
 
Posts: 170
Joined: Sep 5th, '1
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tead Off » Sep 11th, '10, 01:06

Tea4Todd wrote:
Tead Off wrote:If you are new to DC, I would suggest passing on this in favor of something more mainstream and closer to the DC flavor profile of newer teas. The description is also warning you of inherent bitterness if not handled properly. This might be an easy way to develop an aversion to DC.

Whatever vessel you use, try starting with 1/3 of it filled with loose tea. Use boiled water that has been left to cool for a couple of minutes in the kettle and then do short infusions and adjust from there. It's pretty simple.



Good advice. Could you recommend something in the DC style that won't have the danger of bitterness? I'm starting to see the tea:gaiwan ratio...it's interesting, I'll just have to practice more.

I don't buy teas in America so I can't recommend any. I'm sure Houde has some that you will like. Why don't you ask them? Tell them you don't want a bitter tea and see which DC they recommend. Their prices are reasonable IF the teas measure up.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3485
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tea4Todd » Sep 11th, '10, 01:08

Hou De seems a little expensive to me, I'm on a budget and want to get the most tea for my buck. I purchased from ishopo recently and haven't gotten my order yet, but their small sample sizes and prices were perfect for me. I got a lot of tea for under 20 dollars. So I am happy. I just need to taste it to see what it's like.
User avatar
Tea4Todd
 
Posts: 170
Joined: Sep 5th, '1
Location: Ft. Lauderdale, Florida

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby debunix » Sep 11th, '10, 11:40

First off, if you can afford a sample of Dan Cong like this, you can afford a scale. Get one.

See this chart for what 1 gram of one of my Po Tou Dan Cong looks like, and click on the image for a link to a larger version:

[urlhttp://www.flickr.com/photos/debunix/4354042479/sizes/o/in/set-72157621917341148/]Image[/url]

I use 1 gram for my tiniest teapot (where I need to add the leaves to the hot water, let them start to soften a moment, and push them in to make the long leaves fit!). By the time the leaves soften and swell up, the teapot is quite jammed with them. But for a tea that warns me up front about bitterness as frankly as this one, I'd start with 1 gram in my smaller gaiwans at 2.5 oz.

Tead Off wrote: If you are new to DC, I would suggest passing on this in favor of something more mainstream and closer to the DC flavor profile of newer teas. The description is also warning you of inherent bitterness if not handled properly. This might be an easy way to develop an aversion to DC.


But I agree with TeadOff here, that this is not going to be a great starter Dan Cong.

This was my starter with Phoenix oolongs: "Honey Orchid - Commercial Special Grade"--not a 'single bush' tea, but one good enough to give a good idea of what they're about, and harder to have turn on me than some of the 'single bush' Dan Congs.
User avatar
debunix
 
Posts: 5086
Joined: Jan 10th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Proinsias » Sep 11th, '10, 12:20

Proinsias
 
Posts: 1535
Joined: Mar 19th, '
Location: On the couch

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby entropyembrace » Sep 11th, '10, 15:05

Proinsias wrote:for much cheapness I like this:
http://www.jingteashop.com/pd-jing-tea- ... -eddcm.cfm


I honestly wouldn´t recommend that to a beginner though, I´ve found it much harder to brew than most more expensive dancongs...it can get very bitter and astringent easily.

The higher grade Mi Lan is easier to brew and has more intense flavour and aroma.

http://www.jingteashop.com/pd-jing-tea- ... -milan.cfm

The price is quite a bit higher...but I think it´s easier to handle.

Though I haven´t tried it since 2008 so I don´t know what the 2010 is like exactly. It seems it´s not single bush anymore. Back in 2008 the farmer Jing had bought from had two Mi Lan trees he was processing in separate batches as single bush dancong.
User avatar
entropyembrace
 
Posts: 1930
Joined: Mar 3rd, '0

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby Tea_Rex » Sep 11th, '10, 15:42

Hi Debunix - Thanks for the scale link. Can't beat that price, and I bought one immediately. And free shipping (with Amazon Prime).
Tea_Rex
 
Posts: 52
Joined: Feb 16th, '
Location: San Francisco, CA

Re: 90's FengHuang Dancong?

Postby teaisme » Sep 13th, '10, 15:13

If you want to try it go ahead don't be scared to try because it says you must be careful, just brew the first time light, very very short infusions then increase from their to your taste

As long as you keep the infusions really short first time around you will be just fine

A lot of dancongs get too bitter if brewed long, that is just one of their characteristics, I actually enjoy a strong flavourful cup with that bite(not overwhelming bite though) every once and a while
User avatar
teaisme
 
Posts: 1390
Joined: May 27th, '

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation