Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby iannon » Feb 11th, '11, 22:09

sebpassion wrote:my favourite oolong is taiwanese gao shan.
it's very sweet and buttery with some fruity notes.

+1.. li shans and ali shans are some of the most sweet/buttery..to me anyway

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby Ambrose » Feb 12th, '11, 10:20

winter li shan floating leaves

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby BioHorn » Feb 14th, '11, 21:59

Teamasters
2009 Fall Hung Shui from Feng Huang

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby debunix » Feb 14th, '11, 23:01

What does 'buttery' mean to you in describing a tea? I think of butter as a rich sweet-to-savory dairy flavor, and while I have often identified notes that I think of as sweet, grassy, floral, caramel, new-mown hay, herbaceous/resinous, earthy, spicy, fruity, I can't really think of something I'd identify as 'buttery'.

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby Tead Off » Feb 15th, '11, 05:04

debunix wrote:What does 'buttery' mean to you in describing a tea? I think of butter as a rich sweet-to-savory dairy flavor, and while I have often identified notes that I think of as sweet, grassy, floral, caramel, new-mown hay, herbaceous/resinous, earthy, spicy, fruity, I can't really think of something I'd identify as 'buttery'.

I use this term to describe a silky mouthfeel that some teas impart apart from the flavor. Almost a coating in my mouth. My wife uses the term 'wet' for some teas that make the mouth water but don't have that 'coating' I mentioned. In a sense, it's almost the opposite of astringent or drying. I'm sure others will have a different explanation.

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby debunix » Feb 15th, '11, 10:39

that makes sense--a texture rather than a flavor.

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby woozl » Feb 15th, '11, 16:36

MMMMM..... Buutter :)

Definitely a mouth feel.
Lack of astringency, smooth glycerin, coating feel.


li shan tea trekker

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby Tead Off » Feb 15th, '11, 21:41

Last night, I dug into my 13 year old Shui Xian Wuyi stash which is running dangerously low and might not be replaceable. Here was the epitome of 'butteriness'. Delicious, oily, smooth, and, sweet.

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Re: Recommend A Rich, Buttery Oolong

Postby debunix » Feb 15th, '11, 21:54

Ok....I think I get it. I would think of that as a certain richness and mouthfeel, that I associate with my favorite TGYs, those from Jing Tea Shop and from Norbu; and some excellent Mao Xie from each of these suppliers and Huang Jin Gui from Norbu, and Alishan oolongs from Norbu. Now drinking fall 2010 Long Juan TGY from Jing Tea Shop, clearly fits the bill.

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