TeaTrekker Special Aged Vintage Da Hong Pao


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Re: TeaTrekker Special Aged Vintage Da Hong Pao

Postby AdamMY » May 25th, '11, 08:59

bagua7 wrote:Call yourself lucky if you ever get the chance to try real Da Hong Pao especially if you live outside of China, otherwise the tea is most likely to be Xiao Hong Pao (clones of the original trees mixed with other teas).



I wish people would stop spewing this phrase, thinking it is unique to Da Hong Pao. The truth is most famous teas are so named because there is some story attached to a few specific bushes. As such no one ever really gets the chance, except for very well connected individuals, or people with insanely deep pockets ever get the chance to try teas from the "original bushes." So if you believe the "real ________" is the tea made from the original bushes, then you are quite unlikely to try "Real TLH", "Real Long Jing", " Real Bi lo Chun", "Real Tie Guan Yin" and so on.

But many people say as long as the bushes are believed to be within so many cloned generations of the original trees are quite often accepted as legitimately being able to be called by that name, TLH, TGY, DHP, etc.... It all depends on how you define real, and if you choose to define real for Da Hong Pao in that fashion, then you have likely never tasted a "real " tea.
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Re: TeaTrekker Special Aged Vintage Da Hong Pao

Postby edkrueger » May 25th, '11, 12:22

I think the reason this perpetuates with DHP is that there are clearly identified original bushes –supposedly. With TGY, Bi Lou Chun, etc. you are clearly referring to a cultivar, with DHP some stuff can be concocted.

Also, according to Wikipedia, Xiao Hong Pao refers to 4th generation or greater. I have also heard that Xiao Hong Pao refers to refers to a smaller leafed cultivar that is a descendant of the DHP cultivar. I have also heard XHP refer to a Taiwanese descendant cultivar of DHP. Not sure which, if any of the above are correct, but I know XHP is not "clones of the original trees mixed with other teas". I am sure mixing goes on–illicitly or otherwise–, but that is not what makes XHP XHP. A lot of DHP on the market is a blend of leaves or simply the best Yancha a shop sells regardless of what cultivar it is made from.
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Re: TeaTrekker Special Aged Vintage Da Hong Pao

Postby gingkoseto » May 26th, '11, 00:48

A Xiao Hong Pao (small red robe) I currently have, according to the producer, is made from a tea tree cultivar called Xiao Hong Pao, which is not related to Da Hong Pao.

I've also seen Xiao Hong Pao claimed to be offspring of Da Hong Pao, and I personally don't like people inventing names like this. :shock:

And yeah I don't know what's so special about the original trees of Da Hong Pao. And obviously I won't have a chance to know by tasting :mrgreen: Cloned descendants of DHP are quite abundant nowadays, so not being able to afford tea from the "original" trees doesn't bother me much. :mrgreen:
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Re: TeaTrekker Special Aged Vintage Da Hong Pao

Postby Drax » May 26th, '11, 06:41

gingkoseto wrote:A Xiao Hong Pao (small red robe) I currently have, according to the producer, is made from a tea tree cultivar called Xiao Hong Pao, which is not related to Da Hong Pao.


Slight tangent, but... according to the legend, somebody gave a big red robe to wrap around the tea bush in gratitude for making such wonderful tea. But whenever I hear "little red robe," I can't help but think about hundreds of tiny little red robes wrapped around the separate leaves... :lol:
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