Qilaishan Oolong


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Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Intelligen_tea_... » Jan 17th, '12, 23:58

Does anyone know about this type of tea? Has anybody tried a Qilaishan oolong that is worth mentioning? I am having trouble finding a U.S. company that sells Qilaishan oolong teas. Seven Cups is the only one that I have found so far, but I want to try another brand for comparison.

Here's what I know about Qilaishan: it is apparently the highest peak in Taiwan. The highest tea gardens provide for ideal tea growing conditions -- fog cover and drastic temperature changes. From what I can tell, Qilaishan yields a thick, milky tea leaf that lasts for several infusions if processed correctly.
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby TIM » Jan 18th, '12, 00:05

How high is the highest peak?
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby wyardley » Jan 18th, '12, 00:37

I haven't had this tea or heard of it, but based on this:
http://www.sevencups.com/tea_shop/Qilai ... _2010.html

However, if it's 2000 meters, it's pretty definitely not the highest peak in Taiwan (nor does their website make that claim).
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Tead Off » Jan 18th, '12, 12:46

intelligen_tea_a wrote:Does anyone know about this type of tea? Has anybody tried a Qilaishan oolong that is worth mentioning? I am having trouble finding a U.S. company that sells Qilaishan oolong teas. Seven Cups is the only one that I have found so far, but I want to try another brand for comparison.

Here's what I know about Qilaishan: it is apparently the highest peak in Taiwan. The highest tea gardens provide for ideal tea growing conditions -- fog cover and drastic temperature changes. From what I can tell, Qilaishan yields a thick, milky tea leaf that lasts for several infusions if processed correctly.

The highest peak in Taiwan is Yushan, over 3900m. But, tea is not grown that high. Claims for the highest tea gardens in Taiwan are Da Yu Ling and Wu Ling at 2700m.
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Intelligen_tea_... » Jan 18th, '12, 14:10

Tead Off wrote:
intelligen_tea_a wrote:Does anyone know about this type of tea? Has anybody tried a Qilaishan oolong that is worth mentioning? I am having trouble finding a U.S. company that sells Qilaishan oolong teas. Seven Cups is the only one that I have found so far, but I want to try another brand for comparison.

Here's what I know about Qilaishan: it is apparently the highest peak in Taiwan. The highest tea gardens provide for ideal tea growing conditions -- fog cover and drastic temperature changes. From what I can tell, Qilaishan yields a thick, milky tea leaf that lasts for several infusions if processed correctly.

The highest peak in Taiwan is Yushan, over 3900m. But, tea is not grown that high. Claims for the highest tea gardens in Taiwan are Da Yu Ling and Wu Ling at 2700m.


If that's the case, then the 2000 meter Qilaishan tea is good enough for me!
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby TIM » Jan 18th, '12, 18:06

Tead Off wrote:
intelligen_tea_a wrote:Does anyone know about this type of tea? Has anybody tried a Qilaishan oolong that is worth mentioning? I am having trouble finding a U.S. company that sells Qilaishan oolong teas. Seven Cups is the only one that I have found so far, but I want to try another brand for comparison.

Here's what I know about Qilaishan: it is apparently the highest peak in Taiwan. The highest tea gardens provide for ideal tea growing conditions -- fog cover and drastic temperature changes. From what I can tell, Qilaishan yields a thick, milky tea leaf that lasts for several infusions if processed correctly.

The highest peak in Taiwan is Yushan, over 3900m. But, tea is not grown that high. Claims for the highest tea gardens in Taiwan are Da Yu Ling and Wu Ling at 2700m.


Someone finally did some homework, or did he? :lol:
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Intelligen_tea_... » Jan 18th, '12, 19:09

TIM wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
intelligen_tea_a wrote:Does anyone know about this type of tea? Has anybody tried a Qilaishan oolong that is worth mentioning? I am having trouble finding a U.S. company that sells Qilaishan oolong teas. Seven Cups is the only one that I have found so far, but I want to try another brand for comparison.

Here's what I know about Qilaishan: it is apparently the highest peak in Taiwan. The highest tea gardens provide for ideal tea growing conditions -- fog cover and drastic temperature changes. From what I can tell, Qilaishan yields a thick, milky tea leaf that lasts for several infusions if processed correctly.

The highest peak in Taiwan is Yushan, over 3900m. But, tea is not grown that high. Claims for the highest tea gardens in Taiwan are Da Yu Ling and Wu Ling at 2700m.


Someone finally did some homework, or did he? :lol:


I think we're all doing homework here to some extent, just comparing notes. :wink: Obviously, my claim for Qilaishan being the highest peak came from a misfounded source (a lecture from Zhuping Hodge). Anyways, I wanted to thank all of you for sharing your knowledge with me, it is really helping me to grow as a knowledgeable tea fanatic :D .
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Chip » Jan 18th, '12, 22:43

If you have not already discovered, there is a vast wealth of this misinformation on tea out there. Most information from a vendor sadly has to double checked.

Fortunately there is a place like TC for discussion on all tea related topics.
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Cole » Jan 18th, '12, 23:57

Oddly enough, I just ordered a sample of Luanze Oolong from Qi Lai Shan from TeaMasters. His grows around 2200m, so that might be another good one for you check out and compare. Haven't tried it yet, but I have high hopes!
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Tead Off » Jan 19th, '12, 00:16

Unfortunately, buying a tea under the name of Da Yu Ling or buying a tea that is grown at very high altitudes do not guarantee that the tea is great. I find there is so much variation in quality in Taiwan teas and probably a fair amount of cheating going on.
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Intelligen_tea_... » Jan 19th, '12, 01:23

Tead Off wrote:Unfortunately, buying a tea under the name of Da Yu Ling or buying a tea that is grown at very high altitudes do not guarantee that the tea is great. I find there is so much variation in quality in Taiwan teas and probably a fair amount of cheating going on.


Fortunately, for many of us here, we have enough knowledge to buy from traditionally reputable sources that can be trusted to produce, and to even monitor production from growing to packaging, the best quality teas.
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Intelligen_tea_... » Jan 19th, '12, 01:26

Cole wrote:Oddly enough, I just ordered a sample of Luanze Oolong from Qi Lai Shan from TeaMasters. His grows around 2200m, so that might be another good one for you check out and compare. Haven't tried it yet, but I have high hopes!


Thanks for the info, Cole! This tea looks great, I'd love to hear from you what your impression of it is.
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby wyardley » Jan 19th, '12, 02:50

intelligen_tea_a wrote:Fortunately, for many of us here, we have enough knowledge to buy from traditionally reputable sources that can be trusted to produce, and to even monitor production from growing to packaging, the best quality teas.

Even so, it's pretty much impossible that all of the reputable vendors selling "dayuling" are selling the genuine article. And if pressed, I think many of them will admit that their tea is probably "from the neighborhood" if you really ask. And, even if the vendor is being honest, in many cases, they are not buying the tea directly from the farmer. I think it's naïve to assume that buying from reputable sources means you are always getting what you're being sold.
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Tead Off » Jan 19th, '12, 07:19

intelligen_tea_a wrote:
Tead Off wrote:Unfortunately, buying a tea under the name of Da Yu Ling or buying a tea that is grown at very high altitudes do not guarantee that the tea is great. I find there is so much variation in quality in Taiwan teas and probably a fair amount of cheating going on.


Fortunately, for many of us here, we have enough knowledge to buy from traditionally reputable sources that can be trusted to produce, and to even monitor production from growing to packaging, the best quality teas.

I also have enough knowledge to know when i'm getting screwed. :D
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Re: Qilaishan Oolong

Postby Intelligen_tea_... » Jan 19th, '12, 10:53

wyardley wrote:
intelligen_tea_a wrote:Fortunately, for many of us here, we have enough knowledge to buy from traditionally reputable sources that can be trusted to produce, and to even monitor production from growing to packaging, the best quality teas.

Even so, it's pretty much impossible that all of the reputable vendors selling "dayuling" are selling the genuine article. And if pressed, I think many of them will admit that their tea is probably "from the neighborhood" if you really ask. And, even if the vendor is being honest, in many cases, they are not buying the tea directly from the farmer. I think it's naïve to assume that buying from reputable sources means you are always getting what you're being sold.


There are two companies that I have drilled to be sure that they at least meet the farmers that produce their teas: one is Seven Cups. I have mentioned before that the owners of this company spend at least three months out of the year in China, working with producers to select the finest teas. The other is Intelligentsia. The tea buyer makes sure to buy from small, family owned farms in both China and Taiwan, although he prefers a separation between farmer and processor.
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