Compressed Wuyi?


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Re: Compressed Wuyi?

Postby bonescwa » Feb 12th, '14, 17:36

Tead Off wrote:
bonescwa wrote:I've read that if you have some old yancha that you intend to keep, you can just put it in a rice cooker for a cooking cycle and it eliminates the moisture? And doing this every year or so will keep it?

Moisture will hurt a tea if it is exposed too long to air. What's worse is the loss of aroma and flavor. Heating or refreshing will only be good for a good tea. It cannot really bring back what is lost through oxidation. Keep your teas protected.


I've mostly been drinking the yunnan sourcing tie lo Han and rou gui that has been reccomending here and it seems to be relatively green, so this is a tea that should be used now and not suitable for aging? I have had some aged baozong from hou de that I really love, but even baozong from the 70s was unroasted, right? Thanks for answering my questions, this forum is a great resource
bonescwa
 
Posts: 289
Joined: Feb 3rd, '1

Re: Compressed Wuyi?

Postby Tead Off » Feb 12th, '14, 21:53

bonescwa wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
bonescwa wrote:I've read that if you have some old yancha that you intend to keep, you can just put it in a rice cooker for a cooking cycle and it eliminates the moisture? And doing this every year or so will keep it?

Moisture will hurt a tea if it is exposed too long to air. What's worse is the loss of aroma and flavor. Heating or refreshing will only be good for a good tea. It cannot really bring back what is lost through oxidation. Keep your teas protected.


I've mostly been drinking the yunnan sourcing tie lo Han and rou gui that has been reccomending here and it seems to be relatively green, so this is a tea that should be used now and not suitable for aging? I have had some aged baozong from hou de that I really love, but even baozong from the 70s was unroasted, right? Thanks for answering my questions, this forum is a great resource

Personally, I feel that both of these teas, Rou Gui & TLH, from YS should be drunk now. Neither is a deep tea, IMO. I'm not familiar enough with Baozhong. For me, teas that are good for aging should have depth of flavor and aroma, roasted or not, and stored very carefully.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3506
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Compressed Wuyi?

Postby wyardley » Feb 13th, '14, 02:29

bonescwa wrote:I've mostly been drinking the yunnan sourcing tie lo Han and rou gui that has been reccomending here and it seems to be relatively green, so this is a tea that should be used now and not suitable for aging?


I don't think heavy fire is necessary for tea to age well.

Partly personal preference, but I think an oolong will age well if it has moderate oxidation and sufficient roasting... as mentioned by someone else, the tea also needs to be good quality. It's not always easy to predict what teas will age well.

I haven't tried the teas you mentioned specifically, but I think even the greener yancha that are produced now still tend to a bit more traditional style of processing than a lot of other oolongs. I have tried yancha of various styles after a period of 5-6 years, and I've found that the results aren't always predictable or what you'd expect. Some teas that I thought would benefit from some age didn't, and some teas that I thought might not age gracefully taste great.
User avatar
wyardley
 
Posts: 1934
Joined: Jan 11th, '
Location: Los Angeles, CA

Previous

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation