History of high mountain proccessing


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History of high mountain proccessing

Postby bonescwa » May 9th, '14, 12:51

From what I've read, I get the impression that Taiwanese high mountain teas haven't always been so green and unroasted, which is now the norm. I am wondering if this is true, and if so, how long has this been the case? If anyone has suggestions for resources online or books, I would appreciate it. I would ideally like a history of taiwanese tea in general, if something like that exists. It seems that there is much more information around about Chinese tea.
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Re: History of high mountain proccessing

Postby Poseidon » May 9th, '14, 13:35

I really enjoyed this article from TeaDB. James is pretty knowledgeable about tea and seems to really enjoy everything about tea. Check it out!

http://teadb.org/downward-trend-dark-taiwanese-oolong/


Also, http://www.marshaln.com/2012/06/changing-tastes/
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Re: History of high mountain proccessing

Postby 茶藝-TeaArt08 » May 9th, '14, 13:53

Amongst many sources, I can perhaps post more later, the #13 Chayi/茶藝 Art of Tea magazine also devotes a number of well-written articles to this topic. You can pick it up pretty readily since the back issues are generally in demand. Camellia Sinensis is one source for buying the magazine (http://camellia-sinensis.com/en/teaware/books).

Just back from a month in Taiwan visiting family, farms, teaware artisans, tea shops, and tea teachers, this topic is still widely discussed and ruminated over with concern. Taiwan has so much more to offer than the standard sampling of green wulongs, though the green wulongs are good too.

Blessings!
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Re: History of high mountain proccessing

Postby hop_goblin » May 9th, '14, 17:07

Nice resources! Thanks for sharing all.
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Re: History of high mountain proccessing

Postby debunix » May 9th, '14, 20:14

茶藝-TeaArt08 wrote:Taiwan has so much more to offer than the standard sampling of green wulongs, though the green wulongs are good too.


So true! About 2 years ago Greg Clancy got in quite a variety of oolongs, blacks, greens, and white teas from Taiwan, and all those I tried were excellent and some that seemed to cross boundaries--processed partly like oolongs and partly like green or white teas--were among the best. To my sorrow, they apparently did not sell well enough for him to continue offering them, and I haven't found another source for similar teas since.
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