Oolong tea ' classification


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Postby lonsan » Jan 17th, '08, 02:23

yeh, a darder TGY means it's been deep oxidated, it might tasted bitter and maybe acerbity, a good TGY is green in appearance, and that is the point, it depends on the oxidation process. :wink:
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Postby hop_goblin » Jan 17th, '08, 09:57

Correct me if I am wrong but aren't all Taiwan tea classified as Formosa?
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GuanYingWan To answer a previous posting

Postby teaisgood » Jan 26th, '08, 20:49

GuanYingWang or GuanYingKing is a class of better made TieGuanYing, using better tea leaves and more careful processing. It has different grades as well. There are some simple and basic ways to judge TieGuanYing. One is to look at the dry tea leaves. The better grade should be smaller and tighter rolled. "tie" in TieGuanYing means iron in chinese describing the density of tea is close to that of the iron. Second when the tea is brewed good TieGuanYing should give a very flowery smell, and that smell should stay even after 5 or more brews. Third, when tasting the tea it should leave a sweet and flowery after taste, the longer that after taste last. The better the tea. A good grade GuanYingWan should possess all these characteristics.
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Postby silverneedles » Apr 8th, '08, 13:11

what is Rishi's Qi Lan equivalent in other stores???
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Postby silverneedles » Apr 8th, '08, 13:13

hop_goblin wrote:Correct me if I am wrong but aren't all Taiwan tea classified as Formosa?


formosa=taiwan
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Postby tenuki » Apr 8th, '08, 13:17

hop_goblin wrote:Correct me if I am wrong but aren't all Taiwan tea classified as Formosa?


Yup. To clarify my opaque comment a abit -

There is almost as great a variance in Taiwan teas as Chinese mainland teas (since they share a lot of the same history...). You might as well put the rest of the list under the classification 'Mainland China' instead of breaking it down like that. That was sort of what I was getting at with my comment.

The proposed classification was like a Frenchman categorizing wines by listing all the french wines, then graciously providing a 'non french' category for the rest of the world to fall into.
Last edited by tenuki on Apr 9th, '08, 19:06, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby osadczuk » Apr 9th, '08, 00:40

tenuki wrote:The proposed classification was like a Frenchman categorizing wines by listing all the french wines, then graciously providing a 'non french' category for the rest of the world to fall into.


But is that not exactly what the French would prefer we do? :lol:

And it being that our Oolong friend is presumedly Chinese, one would assume he feels similarly about tea.

Well, there's chinese tea. Then there's... well... you know... the other ones.
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Postby scruffmcgruff » Apr 9th, '08, 01:37

I don't think Hop meant to suggest that all Taiwanese teas are so similar as to have a single title, I think he was just making the connection between the old and new names of Taiwan. I could be wrong, though.

It's perfectly reasonable to refer to "Chinese teas" to distinguish from other countries' offerings, as long as one recognizes that there is indeed a great deal of diversity under the umbrella term "Chinese teas," no?
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Postby tenuki » Apr 9th, '08, 02:09

scruffmcgruff wrote:I don't think Hop meant to suggest that all Taiwanese teas are so similar as to have a single title, I think he was just making the connection between the old and new names of Taiwan. I could be wrong, though.

It's perfectly reasonable to refer to "Chinese teas" to distinguish from other countries' offerings, as long as one recognizes that there is indeed a great deal of diversity under the umbrella term "Chinese teas," no?


Hey scruff, my comments were actually directed at the OP. I know hob wasn't suggesting that, I was trying to clarify what I was talking about. :) I suppose I have now further muddied the water. :D
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Postby scruffmcgruff » Apr 9th, '08, 04:01

Ah, sorry about that! My bad for not checking out the first page.
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Postby nmrfarm » May 13th, '08, 13:00

lonsan wrote:yeh, a darder TGY means it's been deep oxidated, it might tasted bitter and maybe acerbity, a good TGY is green in appearance, and that is the point, it depends on the oxidation process. :wink:


A darker TGy may just mean its deeply roasted, not oxidized.
Also a good TGY doesn't really have to be green in appearance.
Although most modern chinese TGYs are green in appearance.
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Postby chrl42 » May 14th, '08, 22:54

ABx wrote:I heard somewhere recently that Shui Xian (a Wuyi yancha) comes from the same place as Dancong, with Shui Xian being the lowest grade produced and the Dancong being the best produced. Is that correct, or are they from completely different places?


Shui Xian is a type of tea tree that's called which inhabits north of fujian, south of fujian and Guangdong. So technically Shui Xian doesn't just mean Wuyi Yan Cha(north of Fujian) but to extend broader.
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Postby ABx » May 14th, '08, 23:50

chrl42 wrote:Shui Xian is a type of tea tree that's called which inhabits north of fujian, south of fujian and Guangdong. So technically Shui Xian doesn't just mean Wuyi Yan Cha(north of Fujian) but to extend broader.
Thanks, I know that now. That post was made about 7 months ago, but hopefully it will help someone else out there.
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