Ti Guan or Kuan Yin?

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Ti Guan or Kuan Yin?

Postby JD » May 2nd, '08, 02:40

I've seen Ti Guan Yin and Ti Kuan Yin, and both look to be the same tea. Is it?

And if so, where's the place to find the best Ti Kuan Yin? I love this stuff. :D

And are there any other sweet tasting oolongs out there I should try that taste like this?

Last edited by JD on May 6th, '08, 14:04, edited 1 time in total.
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Postby devites » May 2nd, '08, 02:46

Yes those are the same thing. For other sweet oolongs try a ginseng oolong. I am in love with this tea. http://vitaltleaf.chainreactionweb.com/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=4&products_id=49&zenid=197b65925fc515d3e322070ddf0caa4d It has such a delicious sweet aftertaste.

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Postby PolyhymnianMuse » May 2nd, '08, 02:49

I have seen it spelled a number of different ways besides those two, adding letters here and there, switching up letters... Ti Kuan Yin, Tit Kwun Yum, Ti Kwan Yin, Tie Guan Yin, Iron Buddha, Iron Goddess of Mercy, and Tea of the Iron Bodhisattva are all names for the same tea. It is a variety of oolong named after Guan Yin (the bodhisattva of compassion).

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Postby JD » May 2nd, '08, 02:51

lol.. Tit Kwun Yum..

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Re: Ti Guan or Kuan Yin?

Postby Jade Flower » May 2nd, '08, 19:18

jdharding wrote:And are there any other sweet tasting oolongs out there I should try that taste like this?

Try serendipiTea's Forever Spring aka Si Jie Chun, it has sweet notes of honey and pineapple and tastes very similar to Ti Kuan Yin.
I ordered a sample recently and will definetely be buying more of it.

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Postby Thirsty Daruma » May 9th, '08, 14:22

Wade-Giles vs. Pinyin, two romanization systems for Chinese. Personally, I prefer Tin Kuan Yin. The K rattles off a bit better, especially with the Iron Goddess translation. Or you could just call it "Darn good tea."

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Postby bearsbearsbears » May 9th, '08, 17:08

In pinyin, it's tie guan yin. "g" should be used over "k" because /k/ and /g/ are distinct contrasting phonemes in Chinese.

Pinyin being the standard romanization of Mandarin on the mainland, and the mainland being the source of tie guan yin, I personally prefer to use it.

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Postby Chip » May 9th, '08, 17:26

bearsbearsbears wrote:In pinyin, it's tie guan yin. "g" should be used over "k" because /k/ and /g/ are distinct contrasting phonemes in Chinese.

Pinyin being the standard romanization of Mandarin on the mainland, and the mainland being the source of tie guan yin, I personally prefer to use it.


Then I have been wrong for years...I will get them mixed up again I am sure. :wink:

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Postby nmrfarm » May 10th, '08, 17:39

Something more confusing is that Ti Guan Yin could be made from different strains.
They are all tasted different.

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Postby Salsero » May 10th, '08, 18:12

nmrfarm wrote:Something more confusing is that Ti Guan Yin could be made from different strains.
They are all tasted different.
That explains some of th enormous differences. Also, I think that part of Anxi Province is huge and must contain many, many tea farms.

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Postby Thirsty Daruma » May 12th, '08, 21:42

bearsbearsbears wrote:In pinyin, it's tie guan yin. "g" should be used over "k" because /k/ and /g/ are distinct contrasting phonemes in Chinese.

Pinyin being the standard romanization of Mandarin on the mainland, and the mainland being the source of tie guan yin, I personally prefer to use it.


PWND :oops:

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