Milk Oolong

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Postby Victoria » May 31st, '08, 12:03

towerofdabble wrote:OK, I asked Daniel at TeaSpring about their Nai Xiang "milk oolong" and here is his reply:

Yes, the flavor (flavoring) is added after the tea is processed. It is not natural.


His tea looks very much like what I have, and I think confirms my suspicion that this taste/aroma is not naturally occurring.


That is very interesting. Their site does say that their's is a "scented" tea. Now one may ask if they are enhancing or making a "mock' version of a natural occurring tea.

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Postby Salsero » May 31st, '08, 12:11

Wow, what a wonderful world. Ask a straight question, get a straight answer! Someone pinch me, I think I am dreaming.

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Postby ABx » May 31st, '08, 13:41

Victoria wrote:Now one may ask if they are enhancing or making a "mock' version of a natural occurring tea.
MarshalN noted in the older thread that there are both varieties. TeaCuppa, for example, notes that theirs is not a scented one.

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Postby ABx » May 31st, '08, 13:56

towerofdabble wrote:Tenuki's link says:

This tea is grown in the Wuyi Mountains of China and has a really unique taste of sweet milk. ...milk oolong can be difficult to find and may cost more than other oolong teas; however because of the high quality of this tea, the leaves can be brewed three times. This makes milk oolong an economical buy.


Well, it doesn't look at all like a Wuyi tea to me (looks like a Formosa jade)...
You might note that Wuyi is a mountain rather than a tea. Wuyi yancha (Wuyi rock tea) is the type that Wuyi is famous for producing, but there are other teas that come out of Wuyi as well and likely from different cultivars.

...and I don't know of any decent oolong that can't be infused at least 3 times, so I took that explanation with a grain of salt.
How many steeps you get can depend on how you brew it, and that appears to be from the person writing the article; the listing at the tea shop that sells it doesn't mention number of infusions.

Getting an idea of how many steeps you can get (if you can discern the brewing method) can be a roundabout way to give you an idea of the quality. Personally I probably wouldn't expect a lot from that particular tea, but I don't see anything untoward there.

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