Green/light/high mountain - is there a difference?


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Green/light/high mountain - is there a difference?

Postby Ritva » Oct 22nd, '08, 11:02

So far I've been drinking japanese and chinese greens but I'm widening my territory to oolongs as well. I'm a bit confused about some terms. Does green oolongs mean the same as light oolongs or high mountain oolongs? If they are not the same thing could you please tell me what's the difference.
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Postby cheaton » Oct 22nd, '08, 11:07

I may be corrected on this, but I believe that green or light are probably referring to the same thing. However, High Mountain Oolongs don't neccesarily have to be green and light, but they typically are.
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Postby Victoria » Oct 22nd, '08, 11:40

Right. Green and light usually are referring to the same thing. High mountain usually too, but considering that is just the area it is grown, it could be processed many ways resulting from light to dark. But generally speaking - yes.
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Postby Ritva » Oct 23rd, '08, 05:49

Thanks! This cleared things a lot. I've noticed it takes a lot of studying when moving to different teas - all those japanese and chinese names and terms...
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Postby Victoria » Oct 23rd, '08, 07:54

Yeah they like to keep it confusing. All the different names used by the growers then the vendors like to get creative too and throw variations in there to make theirs sound more unique.
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Postby ABx » Oct 23rd, '08, 11:22

High-mountain usually refers to Taiwan (aka Formosa) high mountain oolong. Taiwan is famous for having growing regions high up in the mountains, though you can get Chinese high-mountain oolong as well. The term "high mountain" really indicates particular characteristics more than anything. It's most noticeable in the green/jade oolongs, which are unusually viscous, umami, and sweet, because of how the plant grows at such altitudes.
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Postby hop_goblin » Oct 23rd, '08, 11:25

ABx wrote:High-mountain usually refers to Taiwan (aka Formosa) high mountain oolong. Taiwan is famous for having growing regions high up in the mountains, though you can get Chinese high-mountain oolong as well. The term "high mountain" really indicates particular characteristics more than anything. It's most noticeable in the green/jade oolongs, which are unusually viscous, umami, and sweet, because of how the plant grows at such altitudes.


Actually Abx, it literally means tea from a certain elevation. But yes, high mountain tea typically do share a common charactersistc. however, and unfortnately, the term has been used more inadequately by some vendors to sell more tea.
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Postby Chip » Oct 23rd, '08, 11:35

Often it is a pretty generic term it seems. When a vendor just says "high mountain from Taiwan" without specifying actual origin, you have to wonder. I sometimes wonder if it is added to the product description in such a case more as a marketing ploy for a tea they have no real valid info about..
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Postby gingkoseto » Oct 23rd, '08, 12:38

Agree with all above.
Right now I am having some high mountain oolong which is not green or light :D
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