Taiwan Wuyi teas?


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Taiwan Wuyi teas?

Postby caligatia » Nov 9th, '08, 11:09

It's time for more questions caused by samples from Victoria! This tea is a Taiwan Wuyi. According to the seller, Floating Leaves Tea, a Wuyi varietal was taken to Taiwan a couple of centuries ago. It has the same level of roasting as the other (Chinese) Wuyi Victoria sent, but has a very distinct flavor that makes me think of toasted grain and nuts. It's quite delicious.

My question is: are there a lot of Taiwan Wuyi teas or is this a rarity? I like it and want to get more, but if there are others in the same "genre" I'd like to try those as well.

Thanks!
User avatar
caligatia
 
Posts: 226
Joined: Sep 13th, '
Location: Florida, USA

Re: Taiwan Wuyi teas?

Postby gingkoseto » Nov 9th, '08, 12:03

caligatia wrote:It's time for more questions caused by samples from Victoria! This tea is a Taiwan Wuyi. According to the seller, Floating Leaves Tea, a Wuyi varietal was taken to Taiwan a couple of centuries ago. It has the same level of roasting as the other (Chinese) Wuyi Victoria sent, but has a very distinct flavor that makes me think of toasted grain and nuts. It's quite delicious.

My question is: are there a lot of Taiwan Wuyi teas or is this a rarity? I like it and want to get more, but if there are others in the same "genre" I'd like to try those as well.

Thanks!


The name is confusing, if not mis-leading...
Wuyi is originating center of most oolong varieties (if not all). All Taiwan oolong varieties were offspring from oolong varieties of Fu Jian (home province of Wu Yi), and mostly from Wu Yi. So the name doesn't say how it is different from other Taiwan oolong. I wonder if they try to use the name to emphasize the tea is traditional roast, instead of "green" roast.
User avatar
gingkoseto
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2141
Joined: Sep 24th, '
Location: Boston, MA

Postby skywalker » Nov 9th, '08, 12:09

Most of the Taiwanese ancesters came from Fu Ken province. Wuyi is located in Fu Ken, so they brought these teas from Wuyi about 200 years ago. What I say is Taiwanese perserves many ancient tea variants from Fu Ken, but we don't emphasize these tea as Wuyi, as you know, there are many variants from Wuyi. After many hunderd years of development, Taiwan tea has his special tea culture, so the Wuyi has become a history. One of the tea tree from Wuyi is called "Ching shin", very popular and normal in Taiwan oolong tea, but is rare in Fu Ken now.
User avatar
skywalker
 
Posts: 14
Joined: Nov 8th, '0
Location: Formosa

Postby tenuki » Nov 9th, '08, 17:13

User avatar
tenuki
 
Posts: 2339
Joined: Oct 23rd, '
Location: Seattle Area

Postby caligatia » Nov 9th, '08, 19:49

Thanks for all the info, guys. I'm still drinking infusions of it. Yummy.
User avatar
caligatia
 
Posts: 226
Joined: Sep 13th, '
Location: Florida, USA

Postby Victoria » Nov 9th, '08, 21:46

Heh, Tenuki beat me to it, I just remembered Chip as well as wyardley (and others posting their notes) had written reviews of this one on the Oolong Box Pass thread, it was popular item and got almost as much press as the 2yr old Boazhong!
User avatar
Victoria
 
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 8th, '0
Location: Southern CA

Postby Trioxin » Nov 10th, '08, 04:28

I loved that tea as well. I made sure to purchased 4oz along with the farmers choice, and the oriental beauty. I've become quite fond of floating leaves tea as of late.
User avatar
Trioxin
 
Posts: 627
Joined: Mar 4th, '0
Location: Peoria, IL

Postby Chip » Nov 10th, '08, 11:50

The Taiwan Wuyi was certainly a fascinating oolong. There is a lot of potential in this realm of Taiwan oolong.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22140
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby TIM » Nov 10th, '08, 11:54

skywalker wrote:Most of the Taiwanese ancesters came from Fu Ken province. Wuyi is located in Fu Ken, so they brought these teas from Wuyi about 200 years ago. What I say is Taiwanese perserves many ancient tea variants from Fu Ken, but we don't emphasize these tea as Wuyi, as you know, there are many variants from Wuyi. After many hunderd years of development, Taiwan tea has his special tea culture, so the Wuyi has become a history. One of the tea tree from Wuyi is called "Ching shin", very popular and normal in Taiwan oolong tea, but is rare in Fu Ken now.


The other stories of Taiwanese tea are from Min-nan (old Anxi). Wuyi (Northern) and Min-nan (Southern) are all in Fu Ken or Fujian, Xiamen which is about the size of Taiwan. Most of now-a-days Taiwanese tea are consider Min-nan tea, even the native Taiwanese language is refer to Min-nan dialect.

I was lucky enough to have found the roots for this cultivar:
http://chadao.blogspot.com/2006/03/anxi-tieguanyin-by-thsu.html

But its very confusing to state a Taiwanese tea as a Wuyi yancha, which grow from soil.... Almost like saying a Merlot from Napa is the same as a Bordeaux Merlot?
User avatar
TIM
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2042
Joined: Apr 4th, '0
Location: NYC

Postby Salsero » Nov 10th, '08, 12:59

TIM wrote: I was lucky enough to have found the roots for this cultivar:
http://chadao.blogspot.com/2006/03/anxi-tieguanyin-by-thsu.html?
Wow, Tim, that reference is a great bit of internet tea history and a really fine discussion of Tie Guan Yin! Thanks for posting it.
User avatar
Salsero
 
Posts: 5214
Joined: Dec 21st, '
Location: Gainesville, Florida


Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation