Types of oolong?


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Types of oolong?

Postby Vulture » Nov 22nd, '08, 03:03

So I am just starting to look into oolongs now. I have only tried a couple Boazongs, one which was decent the other not so much. I just tried my first two steepings of 'Organic Qi Zhong a Wuyi Oolong' from Red Blossom Teas. I like this one and will probably order more. They gave me this as a free mini-sample to try out and I have to say it is good.

I wanted to check a few more types out but I have heard there are different types of oolongs. Some people call them 'darker' and 'lighter' oolongs while I have also heard 'green oolong' and 'black oolong'. First question is can someone give me a bit better explination and example of those? Second question is where are the two teas I have tried on that scale? (Baozhong and Wuyi)

Edit: Drinking more of this Wuyi and I think I will order more of this. It is a well balanced tea that doesn't have too much of any flavor. Just a nice overall taste. This has almost converted me over to drinking at least this oolong regularly.
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Postby stanthegoomba » Nov 22nd, '08, 04:47

Green oolongs are quite literally closer to green tea, because they haven't been oxidized for very long. Oolongs that are 40-80% oxidized are considered dark. Any darker and you've got black tea. Some oolongs are also roasted as part of their processing, which gives them a charcoal flavour that often improves with age.

Wuyi teas are from the Wuyi mountains in Fujian, China. They're generally dark and roasted. The most famous is Da Hong Pao (Big Red Robe), but I've found it safer (and cheaper!) to avoid this one when you're ordering online because of all the hype. Rou Gui, on the other hand, is always awesome. Always.

Baozhong (pouchong) is one of the greenest, least processed oolongs. So you basically picked samples from two ends of the scale. Just don't settle on anything yet: I rarely ever drink the same oolong twice, and I'm discovering new "favourites" all the time.

wulong (乌龙) = "black dragon." Which, in my opinion, is a kickass name for tea. Enjoy it. :)
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Postby Vulture » Nov 22nd, '08, 05:15

Haha well its nice to have tried both sides. I think I will have to try a dark non-roasted then but still. I only have enough of this Wuyi for 1 more session so I am going to order at least a sampler.
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Postby stanthegoomba » Nov 22nd, '08, 05:36

Then you might want to check out Bai Hao (Oriental Beauty), a dark oolong from Taiwan that's light on the roast. To me it tastes too similar to black tea—and that's precisely why some people love it.
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Postby chrl42 » Nov 22nd, '08, 06:49

Wuyi is awesome, it's my main eatery along with rice :)

Like above statement, Rou Gui is always great. Next time you might wanna try Shui Xian and good blended Da Hong Pao. And then with little more payment, Si Da Ming Cong - Da Hong Pao, Tie Luo Han, Shui Jin Gui and Bai Ji Guan.

Another branch might have Tie Guan Yin family from south of Fujian. That are Mao Xie, Ben Shan, Huang Jin Gui and Anxi Tie Guan Yin.

Taiwanese Oolong took over the tradition of TGY, namely Dong Ding and Mu Zha Tie Guan Yin. Gao Shan (high-mountain) Oolong has Alishan, Lishan and top-graded Da Yu Ling. Bai Hao Oolong(oriental beauty) and Baozhong as well are famous Taiwanese Oolong.

Famous Guangdong Oolong is Feng Huang Dan Cong which comes with variety of scent(Milan, Guihua, Baxian, Shanjiaye etc..) Or with price up and down then select Songzhong or Shuixian

:|
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Postby Vulture » Nov 22nd, '08, 08:58

chrl42 wrote:Wuyi is awesome, it's my main eatery along with rice :)

Like above statement, Rou Gui is always great. Next time you might wanna try Shui Xian and good blended Da Hong Pao. And then with little more payment, Si Da Ming Cong - Da Hong Pao, Tie Luo Han, Shui Jin Gui and Bai Ji Guan.

Another branch might have Tie Guan Yin family from south of Fujian. That are Mao Xie, Ben Shan, Huang Jin Gui and Anxi Tie Guan Yin.

Taiwanese Oolong took over the tradition of TGY, namely Dong Ding and Mu Zha Tie Guan Yin. Gao Shan (high-mountain) Oolong has Alishan, Lishan and top-graded Da Yu Ling. Bai Hao Oolong(oriental beauty) and Baozhong as well are famous Taiwanese Oolong.

Famous Guangdong Oolong is Feng Huang Dan Cong which comes with variety of scent(Milan, Guihua, Baxian, Shanjiaye etc..) Or with price up and down then select Songzhong or Shuixian

:|


Haha thanks for the help but I think that is a little overwhelming. I will see about spending my months budget on getting a Bai Hao and a Rou Gui to try along with more of this Qi Zhong. Then we will see where it goes.
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Postby Drax » Nov 22nd, '08, 09:13

On "Big Red Robe" -- avoid the type about centuries old tea bushes. Those are the uber-expensive teas. But you can still find very decently priced ones. I got some from from Dragon Tea House, and another batch either from Seven Cups or YSLLC. It makes a very dark tea with a flavor that borders on tobacco-y. Definitely worth checking out, IMO.
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Postby ABx » Nov 22nd, '08, 16:14

I would actually check out some of the other Wuyi teas. What you had was probably a Shui Xian (many vendors sell this as simply "Wuyi Oolong"), and it's probably the most basic of yancha. Lao Cong (old bush) Shui Xian and Rou Gui are good ones to start with, some DHP, and then there's even nicer ones to check out later (that may take more skill to brew well, depending).

I have to contest the idea that Rou Gui is always good, though :) The majority are good, but I've had some very low fire ones that I didn't care much for, specifically TeaSpring's. It was very green and not much like a Rou Gui at all. I suppose it was a decent tea, but I put it at the bottom of my list.

TeaCuppa and Jing Tea Shop are two of the best places to get yancha as they both specialize. TeaCuppa has some that are outstanding, particularly the Lao Cong Shui Xian (2004) and 2005 Rou Gui which are both perfectly balanced and fairly forgiving as far as brewing. I've also never been disappointed by anything from Jing, whose teas are often less expensive (and for twice as much) but shipping takes 10-15+ days (my most recent order took 3 weeks).

For the greener oolongs Hou De and Floating Leaves have some of the best. Even their cheapies tend to be better than a lot of vendors' stuff. Hou De has good yancha, too, but they're pretty pricey.
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Postby stanthegoomba » Nov 23rd, '08, 01:00

ABx wrote:I have to contest the idea that Rou Gui is always good, though :) The majority are good, but I've had some very low fire ones that I didn't care much for, specifically TeaSpring's. It was very green and not much like a Rou Gui at all. I suppose it was a decent tea, but I put it at the bottom of my list.


I think Rou Gui isn't subject to the same kind of mislabeling and greedy vendor shtick that afflicts DHP and other popular teas—yet. But thanks for the warning about TeaSpring.

TeaCuppa has some that are outstanding, particularly the Lao Cong Shui Xian (2004) and 2005 Rou Gui which are both perfectly balanced and fairly forgiving as far as brewing.


Amen!

And no discussion about oolong types would be complete without a nod to tieguanyin. When it's done right, this is the tea that will make you believe that the existence of Camellia sinensis is proof of a benevolent God—or at least an Iron Bodhavista of Mercy. :P Sadly the name is subject to the same hype that you find with DHP.
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Postby thanks » Nov 23rd, '08, 04:53

stanthegoomba wrote:
ABx wrote:I have to contest the idea that Rou Gui is always good, though :) The majority are good, but I've had some very low fire ones that I didn't care much for, specifically TeaSpring's. It was very green and not much like a Rou Gui at all. I suppose it was a decent tea, but I put it at the bottom of my list.


I think Rou Gui isn't subject to the same kind of mislabeling and greedy vendor shtick that afflicts DHP and other popular teas—yet. But thanks for the warning about TeaSpring.

TeaCuppa has some that are outstanding, particularly the Lao Cong Shui Xian (2004) and 2005 Rou Gui which are both perfectly balanced and fairly forgiving as far as brewing.


Amen!

And no discussion about oolong types would be complete without a nod to tieguanyin. When it's done right, this is the tea that will make you believe that the existence of Camellia sinensis is proof of a benevolent God—or at least an Iron Bodhavista of Mercy. :P Sadly the name is subject to the same hype that you find with DHP.


Could you point me to one of these TGY? Most of the ones I've tried would be so much better with even just a little bit of roast :?. I've been eying the Zheng-Cong Mu-Zha from 07 at Houdea http://www.houdeasianart.com/index.php? ... cts_id=901

Have you tried it? I'm wondering if it's good. I've yet to had a bad oolong from Hou De, but still.
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Postby stanthegoomba » Nov 23rd, '08, 11:16

Just4Tea's is a standout.
I have yet to try Hou De's.

(But I still enjoy jade TKY.)
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Postby thanks » Nov 23rd, '08, 11:32

stanthegoomba wrote:Just4Tea's is a standout.
I have yet to try Hou De's.

(But I still enjoy jade TKY.)


That's also a very reasonable price. Thanks for the tip.
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Postby pb2q » Nov 23rd, '08, 22:58

thanks for the help but I think that is a little overwhelming.


It's easy to get lost with so many varieties.

One thing that I suggest is that you try a traditionally roasted oolong. The aroma and flavor of these teas is remarkable: they have the most surprising meaty/savoury/berry aroma. And beneath that hints of nearly everything else that oolong has to offer. Really delicious. The brewed leaves are dark and oily, and remain twisted, resembling cooked puerh leaves in the cup.

It's a great classroom lesson to try a lighter oolong and a traditional roast back to back.
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Re: Types of oolong?

Postby pb2q » Nov 23rd, '08, 23:13

Vulture wrote:Some people call them 'darker' and 'lighter' oolongs while I have also heard 'green oolong' and 'black oolong'. First question is can someone give me a bit better explination and example of those? Second question is where are the two teas I have tried on that scale? (Baozhong and Wuyi)


I see that I didn't address your questions. I can tell you that your BaoZhongs are on the very lightly-roasted side of the scale. As for the terminology I'll offer nothing past the obvious interpretation.
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Postby Vulture » Nov 24th, '08, 00:33

During the Saturday Video chat I had a session with some Glendale Handmade Nigilri(?). It was an interesting taste. At first a nice oolong smooth taste but with a strange Fruit Loops kicker. Not anything strong but enough to make it amusing. I don't think I would be drinking it regularly but it was still good.

I think I will have to get some more oolongs here in a bit...
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