Do you rinse your oolongs?

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Do you rinse your oolongs?

yes, to open the tea up
7
12%
yes, to clean the tea
4
7%
yes, to clean and open up the tea
22
37%
yes, for other reasons
1
2%
no
11
19%
sometimes
14
24%
 
Total votes: 59

Do you rinse your oolongs?

Postby taitea » Nov 25th, '08, 19:33

Do you? Why?

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Re: Do you rinse your oolongs?

Postby Herb_Master » Nov 25th, '08, 20:31

taitea wrote:Do you? Why?


Well I am just a beginner so do it mainly because "one is supposed to"

As for cleaning, it is better to be safe than sorry.

As to opening up, some need it more than others. In particular some of the older aged ones seemed to be more drinkable after a couple of brews - so I will experiment with longer rinsing and see if the earlier brews improve. To me it is only partly to open them up and partly to wash out some of the less pleasant early flavours.

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Postby thanks » Nov 25th, '08, 21:39

I've seen it suggested everywhere, but to be honest that first infusion is almost always my favorite. I love not rinsing my oolongs.

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Postby Proinsias » Nov 25th, '08, 21:42

If the leaf looks/smells suspicious, rinse it. If the first brew looks/smells suspicious it can easily be converted into a rinse.

If I've just sold a kidney to finance a tiny baggie of oolong I'm unlikely to chuck any of it down the drain.

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Postby Victoria » Nov 25th, '08, 21:52

No rinsing here.

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Postby leiche » Nov 25th, '08, 22:33

I rinsed a TGY once to see what the difference between the two methods was, and found that I preferred it unrinsed. I've never bothered to rinse anything else.

The first steep's almost always my favorite, anyway.

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Postby hop_goblin » Nov 25th, '08, 22:44

Why wouldn't you! Good god, the Chinese tea producing process is not the most sanitary thing. Never know if there is a booger pickin, butt scratchen China man that touched your leaves first! :lol:

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Postby stanthegoomba » Nov 25th, '08, 22:58

I rinse to get everything warm and wet and smelling of tea. (Heheh...)The rinse water preheats my pitcher and cups, and it keeps the pot temperature high for the first proper infusion. I usually take a sip of it to gauge how long the first infusion should be, since I don't measure my leaves beforehand.

The best part, of course, is pouring the excess back over the yixing pot and watching it shine and steam. Even if it's just for show. :P

My only concern is that this step might be rinsing away the bulk of caffeine. (Yes, I'd actually consider that a bad thing. :twisted:) I'm interested in knowing if this is actually the case; but caffeine in tea hits me in different ways depending on what I've eaten, the time of day, the weather, etc... so I can't single out the rinse as a culprit. Anyone care to shed some light?

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Postby Proinsias » Nov 25th, '08, 23:07

The bulk of the caffeine should be just fine after a flash rinse, there's screeds of stuff on it here and elsewhere but the general consensus is that a flash rinse, or even a thirty second one, is not going whisk away much of your caffeine.

Some info here:

http://chadao.blogspot.com/2008/02/caff ... ality.html

it has been noted that the methods used may not be full proof and all encompassing.

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Postby stanthegoomba » Nov 25th, '08, 23:15

Proinsias wrote:Some info here:

http://chadao.blogspot.com/2008/02/caff ... ality.html

it has been noted that the methods used may not be full proof and all encompassing.


My question! Answered to scientific precision by a renowned expert and subsequently scrutinized and debated in a comment thread by tea ninjas from around the globe. I love when that happens. Thanks!

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Postby Trioxin » Nov 26th, '08, 01:38

Nope. Sounds like it may be a good idea for sanitary reason, but I highly doubt it would actually help. As long as the water is hot enough to kill germs, I feel I'm good.

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Postby olivierco » Nov 26th, '08, 02:01

Usually yes, a flash rinse to open up the leaves and preheat the teaware.

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Postby Victoria » Nov 26th, '08, 02:44

Well I'm shying away from Chinese oolongs and I am one of those who uses boiling water, so I don't worry too much.

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Postby Vulture » Nov 26th, '08, 03:21

Trioxin wrote:Nope. Sounds like it may be a good idea for sanitary reason, but I highly doubt it would actually help. As long as the water is hot enough to kill germs, I feel I'm good.


I am with trioxin on this. Though I just started oolongs, my idea of a full tea session includes tasting every steep of a tea. I don't care how bad it tastes, it is part of the tea's experience. The hot water should purge any germs and my stomach acid will finish off any other nastiest.

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Postby hop_goblin » Nov 26th, '08, 09:13

Vulture wrote:
Trioxin wrote:Nope. Sounds like it may be a good idea for sanitary reason, but I highly doubt it would actually help. As long as the water is hot enough to kill germs, I feel I'm good.


I am with trioxin on this. Though I just started oolongs, my idea of a full tea session includes tasting every steep of a tea. I don't care how bad it tastes, it is part of the tea's experience. The hot water should purge any germs and my stomach acid will finish off any other nastiest.


These a difference between sanitize and clean. I still think it is a good idea. Especially of their are some potential "unknown" chemicals.

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