Winter vs spring taiwanese oolong

Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Winter vs spring taiwanese oolong

Postby Jeremy » Dec 2nd, '08, 11:44

Anyone have any thoughts on this? What can I expect from either variety?

Thanks
Jeremy

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Postby geeber1 » Dec 2nd, '08, 15:03

Jeremy,

I don't know anything about oolongs, but your avatar is sure cute.

Is that a guinea pig? With a pancake on his head?

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Postby Jeremy » Dec 2nd, '08, 16:02

geeber1 wrote:Jeremy,

I don't know anything about oolongs, but your avatar is sure cute.

Is that a guinea pig? With a pancake on his head?


Actually that is an internet phenomena call oolong the rabbit, hahahahah. Google image search it, and you will see what it is. Its some nut job who balances all kinds of stuff on his pet rabbits head. Apparently he doesnt mind.

I was waiting for a comment.


:lol:

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Postby Jeremy » Dec 2nd, '08, 16:03

geeber1 wrote:Jeremy,

I don't know anything about oolongs, but your avatar is sure cute.

Is that a guinea pig? With a pancake on his head?


Oh and this one does happen to be a pancake.

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Postby Maitre_Tea » Dec 3rd, '08, 10:47

ok, here's just my two cents on winter vs. spring Taiwanese oolong. Typically, at least in my opinion, spring oolongs tend to be more floral, and more delicate in flavor. Winter oolongs though usually have a richer taste to it. My theory is that tea leaves grow more slowly in the winter so each leaf has more flavor. At least in Taiwan, spring oolongs are usually highly priced, but it all boils down to what you like. Also, the roasting also plays a huge factor in how spring or winter oolongs taste.

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Postby edkrueger » Dec 3rd, '08, 21:30

Winter has taste and mouth feel. Plants in general put out fewer bigger leaves when its cold. Winter also has shorter days, so the plants put more chlorophyll into leaves. These things probably contribute the the smoother smoother, more vegetal and stronger tasting winter oolongs.

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Postby Salsero » Dec 3rd, '08, 23:16

Tea from Taiwan says, "Winter tea is considered to be the best tea of the year followed closely by spring tea." They distinguish 4 seasons and mention that Bai Hao is an exception because it is exclusive to the summer months.

I don't know if that generalization is also meant to apply to the great teas of the Wuyi area or just to the relatively green oolongs of Taiwan.

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Postby Ritva » Dec 4th, '08, 05:12

Jeremy wrote:
geeber1 wrote:Jeremy,

I don't know anything about oolongs, but your avatar is sure cute.

Is that a guinea pig? With a pancake on his head?


Actually that is an internet phenomena call oolong the rabbit, hahahahah. Google image search it, and you will see what it is. Its some nut job who balances all kinds of stuff on his pet rabbits head. Apparently he doesnt mind.
:lol:


I made the google search and look what I found!
Image

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