Da Hong Pao / Big Red Robe flavor


Owes its flavors to oxidation levels between green & black tea.

Da Hong Pao / Big Red Robe flavor

Postby Drax » Dec 16th, '08, 22:13

I'm not so good with naming flavors that I don't already know.

Can somebody help me describe the flavor from Big Red Robe? My mind wants to say tobacco-like, but that doesn't quite seem right.

Anybody?
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Postby Cinnamon Kitty » Dec 16th, '08, 22:23

I went with molasses. The one Big Red Robe that I tried reminded me of the smell of the dough we make for molasses roll out cookies complete with just a touch of spice in the later steeps.
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Postby ABx » Dec 17th, '08, 02:46

It really depends on the one you get. Every store sells a different DHP with different characteristics. Where did you get the one you're trying to describe?

The essential DHP taste/aroma that sets it apart from other yancha is floral, perhaps with a bit of honeysuckle and a light roasted honey foundation to that floral note. That's just a small group of notes within a variety of stronger base characteristics that will vary between farms, batches, and ages. If you have a young high-fire one, for example, it may be nothing but roast (some call it charcoal), which hides the nuances until it ages for a few years.
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Postby Drax » Dec 17th, '08, 06:42

ABx wrote:It really depends on the one you get. Every store sells a different DHP with different characteristics. Where did you get the one you're trying to describe?


Interesting. . . I bought batches from both Yunnan Sourcing and also from the Dragon Tea House. They really taste the same to me. Or at least 85% the same, I haven't done a back-to-back tasting. They both have the same really strong flavor that I can't pin -- molasses seems to be going in the right direction, but I suppose it could just be "roast."

Hmmmm...
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Postby Oni » Dec 17th, '08, 06:48

I`m curious whether someone has tried DHP from Teaspring, they sell two special small packages, Wu Yi Cha Wang Da Hong Pao, Diao Yu Tai Te Gong Da Hong Pao, both in 15g packages, the description was interesting.
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Postby Herb_Master » Dec 17th, '08, 08:21

A timely post for me, I have been alternately sampling 3 DHP's for almost a week now and can't get my brain round describing the differences, the similarities are obvious but so difficult to put into words.
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Postby chrl42 » Dec 17th, '08, 09:13

Maybe you should distinguish between Qing Xiang and Nong Xiang.

Trendy is Qing Xiang but many old vendors sell Nong Xiang and call that traditional.

Qing Xiang is more floral but fades out easily. Nong Xiang you can still sense the fire left over.

Top-grade like Zheng Yan, I often felt it's neither Qing Xiang or Nong Xiang..and taste never fades out!


Oh by the way, a key to understand DHP is a cliff feeling called Yan Yun. Sort of Hui Gan that enlightens you gravity..(at least that's what book said :( ). Is what Wuyi lovers consider as Hui Gan or camphor aroma as Puerh lovers do. Bad DHP doesn't have Yan Yun.
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Postby edkrueger » Dec 17th, '08, 12:01

I've always had difficulty understanding "camphor" in pu-erh. What is it?
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Postby greenisgood » Dec 17th, '08, 17:38

camphor is a woody kind of spicy sweet smell that i think comes from a certain type of evergreen. i only really know the smell on its own from burt's bees products but its pretty common in asia i guess.

and i can see da hong pao having kind of a tobacco-like flavor but definitly sweet too. it is hard to describe. i don't really think of it as floral though, at least what i've had. and yeah, if anyone's had the teaspring dhp i would like to hear about it.
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Postby Wesli » Dec 17th, '08, 18:20

edkrueger wrote:I've always had difficulty understanding "camphor" in pu-erh. What is it?


It has a menthol feel to it.
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Postby Proinsias » Dec 17th, '08, 18:43

I had both of the Teaspring DHP mini pack offerings earlier in the year. One was better than the other, have no idea which was which now, but neither of them were anything to write home about - just good enough for a half baked TeaChat post.

Hou de has given me the best DHP I've had online with Jing coming in second.
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Postby Oni » Dec 18th, '08, 02:26

About camphor, if you have used Bengay or smelled it, it is the same smell, I read they plant camphor trees near the tea trees so it can take up this taste, and it lasts long, even till the last infusion.
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Postby greenisgood » Dec 18th, '08, 04:05

thanks proinsias, i just made my first hou de order and just got some taiwanese oolongs but i'll have to check out their big red robe too. i'm looking forward to trying their teas, i've heard really good things.
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Postby tenuki » Dec 18th, '08, 04:19

Oni wrote:About camphor, if you have used Bengay or smelled it, it is the same smell, I read they plant camphor trees near the tea trees so it can take up this taste, and it lasts long, even till the last infusion.


Yes, I also heard they put camphor leaves or pots next to crappy puerh in storage. ;) But that tends to leave after a few infusions and never really be in the taste component, only in the smell I would bet.

A friend of mine who grows and makes his own tea for fun made the observation that his tea had very strong pine scent components in it (which I agreed with after I tasted it). His plants were right next to a pine tree. He just moved to a new house and brought his plants with him, so we'll see next time he harvests if the pine goes away.
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Postby Oni » Dec 18th, '08, 04:52

That is why they plant some teas near fruit orchards, they somehow take up the aromatics.
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