Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations


BYOT! Enter TeaChat here, you never know what you may find!

Drax asked, "do you have a tea [or teaware] name you like to say, often?" Please see the topic and share.

Yes, and it (they) is (are) ...
8
53%
Sort of ... it is
3
20%
Maybe
3
20%
I do not think so
0
No votes
Nope
1
7%
Other
0
No votes
 
Total votes : 15

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby edkrueger » May 11th, '11, 21:48

Desu is pronounced either way. Its just weird for adults to say it de-su. In most words, adults shorten the u in su if it appears at the end, or drop it completely.
User avatar
edkrueger
 
Posts: 1693
Joined: Jun 24th, '

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby nickE » May 11th, '11, 21:49

wyardley wrote:Well, in Mandarin, you can either say it with an 'sh' sound but with your tongue curled back to the top of your mouth, or you can just say it like most Chinese people I know, and use just a straight s sound. sh without the tongue curled back is 'x', not 'sh'. Southerners tend to transpose ch with c, zh with z, and sh with s. I say it the improper way, because I get made fun of by my wife if I say it "properly".

To my ears, it's usually closer to 'sway' than 'shwee', though some people will be more towards one or the other.

The tones are important also; shui is third tone, so start in the middle, go down, and then go up, and it will be drawn out a little more (time-wise) than if it were in second tone, for example. Xian is first tone, so it will be a high flat tone.

You can click the 'listen' button here to hear female and male voices say it.
http://www.nciku.com/search/zh/detail/% ... B%99/39460

Right, I had completely forgotten about the tones. That certainly complicates things even further.

Thanks for the great info!
User avatar
nickE
 
Posts: 709
Joined: Aug 25th, '
Location: Michigan

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby AdamMY » May 11th, '11, 22:56

edkrueger wrote:Desu is pronounced either way. Its just weird for adults to say it de-su. In most words, adults shorten the u in su if it appears at the end, or drop it completely.


This was different, de-su was wrong, and des was wrong. I think there is some sort of odd pronunciation thing that perhaps English speakers have a harder time picking up on.
User avatar
AdamMY
 
Posts: 2359
Joined: Jul 22nd, '
Location: Capital of the Mitten

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby edkrueger » May 11th, '11, 23:38

Yeah, the u is still there, but it is hard to hear as an English speaker. It took a long time but I think I can hear the difference. It sounds a bit like dea-su, but the a is very slight.
User avatar
edkrueger
 
Posts: 1693
Joined: Jun 24th, '

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby Stentor » May 12th, '11, 02:02

Chip wrote:
Stentor wrote:Thank you, Chip. I'm probably going to have some of Yamashita's gyokuro tomorrow (provided I find the time to sit down and enjoy it properly). I'm quite excited about it, never had such high grade gyokuro before.

Which one!!!???!!!


Takumi! I've only got 3 x 8 g of it, so there's not much room to experiment. Gonna start out with 4 g and 60 ml (2 oz).
User avatar
Stentor
 
Posts: 556
Joined: Oct 8th, '1
Location: Germany

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby karmaplace » May 12th, '11, 07:07

edkrueger wrote:Yeah, the u is still there, but it is hard to hear as an English speaker. It took a long time but I think I can hear the difference. It sounds a bit like dea-su, but the a is very slight.


I think of the "u" as a stop. You need to stop your "s" abruptly instead of letting it hiss, and that's where the little "u" slips in. The slight release of sound as your "s" cuts off. :)

It's probably not the case with your teacher, but I've noticed that while there are times where my pronunciation is indeed wrong (in Korean and Japanese), there are also times where it's perfectly fine but "mis-pronounced" only due to my face. I live in Korea and sometimes Koreans see a foreigner and just assume that what they will say is badly pronounced and won't hear it any other way. :roll:
User avatar
karmaplace
 
Posts: 333
Joined: May 3rd, '1
Location: Ulsan, South Korea

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby Drax » May 12th, '11, 07:35

karmaplace wrote:
edkrueger wrote:Yeah, the u is still there, but it is hard to hear as an English speaker. It took a long time but I think I can hear the difference. It sounds a bit like dea-su, but the a is very slight.


I think of the "u" as a stop. You need to stop your "s" abruptly instead of letting it hiss, and that's where the little "u" slips in. The slight release of sound as your "s" cuts off. :)


This explanation is closer to what I'm familiar with. The same goes for all the -masu endings. It's definitely very subtle.

Other vowels get 'devoiced' as well, such as the 'i' in "deshita."

Some of these differences can be a dialect nuance. And sometimes they can also be a gender difference.
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2556
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby Nenugal » May 12th, '11, 12:52

Drax wrote:
karmaplace wrote:
edkrueger wrote:Yeah, the u is still there, but it is hard to hear as an English speaker. It took a long time but I think I can hear the difference. It sounds a bit like dea-su, but the a is very slight.


I think of the "u" as a stop. You need to stop your "s" abruptly instead of letting it hiss, and that's where the little "u" slips in. The slight release of sound as your "s" cuts off. :)


This explanation is closer to what I'm familiar with. The same goes for all the -masu endings. It's definitely very subtle.

Other vowels get 'devoiced' as well, such as the 'i' in "deshita."

Some of these differences can be a dialect nuance. And sometimes they can also be a gender difference.


If the u in desu is almost silent, does the same thing happen to the u in kyusu, where there is also su at the end of the word?

Anyway now I'm reminded how much fun it is to say shiboridashi, shincha and fukamushi, but I'm still not sure how to pronounce gyokuro so I avoid saying that.
User avatar
Nenugal
 
Posts: 492
Joined: Aug 6th, '1
Location: Norway

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby Stentor » May 12th, '11, 13:10

Nenugal wrote:I'm still not sure how to pronounce gyokuro so I avoid saying that.


Listen here: http://www.forvo.com/search/gyokuro/ or here http://www.forvo.com/word/%E7%8E%89%E9%9C%B2/

I just found out they have a "tea" category over there. Quite a few tea related words pronounced by native speakers!
http://www.forvo.com/tag/tea/alphabetically/

Some are written in Japanese so this great post by Drax will help with deciphering those: http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=14675
User avatar
Stentor
 
Posts: 556
Joined: Oct 8th, '1
Location: Germany

Re: Wednesday TeaDay 5/11/11 Fave TeaPronunciations

Postby Nenugal » May 12th, '11, 14:25

Stentor wrote:
Nenugal wrote:I'm still not sure how to pronounce gyokuro so I avoid saying that.


Listen here: http://www.forvo.com/search/gyokuro/ or here http://www.forvo.com/word/%E7%8E%89%E9%9C%B2/

I just found out they have a "tea" category over there. Quite a few tea related words pronounced by native speakers!
http://www.forvo.com/tag/tea/alphabetically/

Some are written in Japanese so this great post by Drax will help with deciphering those: http://www.teachat.com/viewtopic.php?f=6&t=14675


Very useful, thanks!
User avatar
Nenugal
 
Posts: 492
Joined: Aug 6th, '1
Location: Norway

Previous

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation