FRIDAY TeaDay 7/18/08 Has your brewing changed?

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Brewing question revisited. How do you brew? Has it changed since the same time last year?

My brewing methods have not changed
11
22%
My brewing methods have changed
22
45%
I am a newbie of less than one year, but since I started, yes, my methods have changed
12
24%
I am a newbie of less than one year, but my methods have not changed
3
6%
Other
1
2%
 
Total votes: 49

FRIDAY TeaDay 7/18/08 Has your brewing changed?

Postby Chip » Jul 18th, '08, 02:27

Yesterday, more TeaChatters indicated that they drank more tea liquid then any other liquid. You can still vote and discuss this topic.

Welcome one and all to TeaDay! Let's brew and share what is in our cups today, all day...

Today's TeaPoll and discussion topic is once again about brewing. Have your brewing methods changed significantly over the last year, somewhat, or no not really. How have they changed? If you are a newbie, how drastically have your methods changed...or not at all.

I am really looking forward to sharing TeaDay with everyone. Bottoms up, refill, repeat many many times...
Last edited by Chip on Aug 16th, '08, 15:16, edited 2 times in total.
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Postby olivierco » Jul 18th, '08, 02:29

Da Hong Pao, grape Crape Myrtle, and a piece of shiny red cloth, what could be more auspicious of a good day in TeaChat!

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Postby olivierco » Jul 18th, '08, 02:35

The above posted picture isn't of course mine (I don't even have a camera!), but Salsero's.


My brewing methods have changed a little since last year: more leaves for gyokuro. Otherwise, they stayed relatively the same.

This morning Yunnan golden tips from houdeasianarts. My first impression: good tea, perhaps not as good as those I got from Palais des thés (but this one costs about twice as much if I remember well). I will have to organize a blind test.
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Postby chamekke » Jul 18th, '08, 02:54

I'm being a lot more particular about the amount of leaf, the temperature of the water, and the steeping time. Previously I was fairly careless about these things.

In my cup - Ovaltine - because it's bedtime!

{"Blucher!" Whinny!"}
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Postby olivierco » Jul 18th, '08, 03:00

chamekke wrote:I'm being a lot more particular about the amount of leaf, the temperature of the water, and the steeping time. Previously I was fairly careless about these things.

In my cup - Ovaltine - because it's bedtime!

{"Blucher!" Whinny!"}


The name is Ovomaltine in France. Is there any linguistic reason why the name is different?
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Postby omegapd » Jul 18th, '08, 03:10

Mine have changed very little too. I still mainly brew Western style but have tried gong-fu a couple of times. I still need some help with that, though, and will probably start a thread on it in a second in the Pu-erh section. :wink:

Adagio Sweet Cran-cherry this morning at work.

Happy Friday!

EW
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Postby chamekke » Jul 18th, '08, 03:16

olivierco wrote:
chamekke wrote:In my cup - Ovaltine - because it's bedtime!


The name is Ovomaltine in France. Is there any linguistic reason why the name is different?

Good question. Wikipedia says:

Wikipedia wrote:Ovaltine was developed in Switzerland, where it is known by its original name, Ovomaltine (from ovum, Latin for "egg", and malt, originally its main ingredients).

Ovomaltine was exported to England in 1909; it was a misspelling in the trademark registration process that led to the name being truncated to Ovaltine in English-speaking markets.

Olivier, I've always wondered... is Marmite (the yeast-based spread) also called Marmite in France? I know that in French, a marmite is some kind of cooking pot, as shown on the label:

Image

I love the admonition on the label to "spread thinly", i.e., you're well advised to try for the thickness of a single molecule. The first time I saw Marmite, I thought: Ooh, this looks like Nutella! :oops:

Sorry, this is terribly off-topic for a posting so early in the thread. Can I drag it back on topic if I say that the little "marmite" on the label looks like a type of Japanese tea caddy?
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Postby criteaque » Jul 18th, '08, 03:17

chamekke wrote:I'm being a lot more particular about the amount of leaf, the temperature of the water, and the steeping time. Previously I was fairly careless about these things.



Same here. Silver Needle now.
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Postby olivierco » Jul 18th, '08, 03:25

chamekke wrote:Olivier, I've always wondered... is Marmite (the yeast-based spread) also called Marmite in France? I know that in French, a marmite is some kind of cooking pot, as shown on the label:

I love the admonition on the label to "spread thinly", i.e., you're well advised to try for the thickness of a single molecule. The first time I saw Marmite, I thought: Ooh, this looks like Nutella! :oops:

Sorry, this is terribly off-topic for a posting so early in the thread. Can I drag it back on topic if I say that the little "marmite" on the label looks like a type of Japanese tea caddy?


Thanks for the answer.
Marmite isn't sold much in France. You can see it sometimes but mainly on what could be called "ethnic food" shelves.
Nutella. :D I had some today with my breakfast (Ovomaltine, Nutella and Yunnan golden tips thereafter: we aren't off topic anymore!
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Postby bi lew chun » Jul 18th, '08, 04:47

olivierco wrote:The above posted picture isn't of course mine (I don't even have a camera!), but Salsero's.


Very well done! And thanks for mentioning Nutella. Now I'm dying for some.


I have changed my brewing methods since last year, or several years ago when I first brewed loose tea. Or something.
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Postby olivierco » Jul 18th, '08, 06:17

bi lew chun wrote:
Very well done! And thanks for mentioning Nutella. Now I'm dying for some.


Nutella. I have always some at home.

Now Houjicha with my lunch
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Postby TimeforTea » Jul 18th, '08, 09:39

I'm a newbie of less than a year, but my brewing methods haven't changed too much.

This morning, I am enjoying a nice cup of Jasmine #12.

I had a couple of friends in town for the week. Yesterday we went to an English tea room, which was very nice. It reminded me of all of Henley's photos! One friend is trying to quit her Starbucks frappuccino habit, so of course I shared with them my vast tea knowledge. :wink: I had them sniff dozens of teas from my cabinet to see what they would enjoy. I ended up brewing adagio's honeybush vanilla and adagio's honeybush chocolate, which were both very tasty!!
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Postby CynTEAa » Jul 18th, '08, 09:43

Was going to say the Ovomaltine looked like an egg concoction and there's the Wiki to confirm. Interesting...


Actually, my brewing methods have changed a bit since last year. Doing much, much more gong fu and the addition of a kyusu to my teaware family has enhanced my sencha, gyokuro, shincha moments. :)
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Postby kymidwife » Jul 18th, '08, 09:47

I'm cringing with morbid curiousity at what Marmite might taste like. :shock:

Nutella, I am all too familiar with... keep a jar in my fridge most of the time. I learned to refrigerate it because I had a jar that got sort of lost in the back of my pantry shelf, and it was a bit rancid.

My brewing methods have changed considerably... I am not nearly as careless and footloose as I once was. My old method was to brew and stew... leaves stayed in the tea more often than not. I brewed strong and concentrated, and usually bitter, but I was then diluting, sweetening, and drinking as iced tea. It was fine, I loved it, but it is certainly not suitable for finer teas that deserve to be enjoyed in their more pure state. I don't use a timer or a scale, so I am not hardcore yet, but I do have a measuring spoon and I do eyeball the clock when I am brewing my blacks and oolongs. On the occasion that I have greens, I do set a timer and use a thermometer if I hot-brew. but more often I will just cold-brew in the fridge, which I love.

Oolong #8 from adagio in my cup... not my favorite oolong by any stretch, but its ok. I miss my tung ting jade and TKY. :cry:

Sarah
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Postby CynTEAa » Jul 18th, '08, 10:00

kymidwife wrote:I'm cringing with morbid curiousity at what Marmite might taste like. :shock:


...same here! :shock:
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