The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Alex » Mar 22nd, '13, 13:44

Yeah amazing bowl B. Matcha type bowls rarely do it for me but that is a stunning little soul. I'm very pleased you've got it as hopefully that means I'll see it again some day :mrgreen:
User avatar
Alex
 
Posts: 967
Joined: Oct 5th, '0
Location: UK

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby TIM » Mar 22nd, '13, 15:56

Tead Off wrote:
brandon wrote:Thanks Tea Pals!

Mr. F, can't wait to join my French pen pals at your well appointed table.

I'm assuming your bowl is buncheong. If it is, it is slip glazed and prone to chipping and flaking. A certain delicacy will be needed. Could you ascertain the age from the seller?


not a buncheong, but hagi.
User avatar
TIM
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2042
Joined: Apr 4th, '0
Location: NYC

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby edkrueger » Mar 22nd, '13, 20:25

I'm a bit confused about this. Hagi is a city in Japan. Buncheong is a Korean word meaning, I think, powder green or "gray-green ceramics decorated with powder." (according to http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pnch/hd_pnch.htm). I thought mishima (also named for a city) is the Japanese word for buncheong and refers to the technique of overglazing with the green tinted glaze. (Celedon, in the Korean pottery sense, is doing the same with a blue glaze).

This is interesting: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1983.557.2
User avatar
edkrueger
 
Posts: 1693
Joined: Jun 24th, '

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Chip » Mar 22nd, '13, 21:11

brandon wrote:First Breath After a Coma...

Image
Slowly coming back to life.

I was thrilled to see this bowl in action at the Mandarin's Tearoom on March 11th before heading to the Ippodo party with Brandon and Tim. Tim had one of his out as well and he brewed the same pu-erh in each, scooping out tea servings with a small cup which he poured into our drinking cups.

It was quite interesting and exciting! And I was amazed at how the different bowls brewed the same pu-erh differently.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 21937
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji


Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Tead Off » Mar 22nd, '13, 22:19

TIM wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
brandon wrote:Thanks Tea Pals!

Mr. F, can't wait to join my French pen pals at your well appointed table.

I'm assuming your bowl is buncheong. If it is, it is slip glazed and prone to chipping and flaking. A certain delicacy will be needed. Could you ascertain the age from the seller?


not a buncheong, but hagi.

Brandon replied it is buncheong, Joseon period according to the seller. I believe Hagi originated with Korean buncheong wares. Maybe difficult to tell apart in earlier periods. This one seems to be an homage to the famous one in the Japanese museum. That marking on the outside of the bowl is often repeated in Korean bowls.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3210
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby TIM » Mar 22nd, '13, 22:21

Tead Off wrote:
TIM wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
brandon wrote:Thanks Tea Pals!

Mr. F, can't wait to join my French pen pals at your well appointed table.

I'm assuming your bowl is buncheong. If it is, it is slip glazed and prone to chipping and flaking. A certain delicacy will be needed. Could you ascertain the age from the seller?


not a buncheong, but hagi.

Brandon replied it is buncheong, Joseon period according to the seller. I believe Hagi originated with Korean buncheong wares. Maybe difficult to tell apart in earlier periods. This one seems to be an homage to the famous one in the Japanese museum. That marking on the outside of the bowl is often repeated in Korean bowls.


Really Brandon?
User avatar
TIM
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2042
Joined: Apr 4th, '0
Location: NYC

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Tead Off » Mar 22nd, '13, 22:22

edkrueger wrote:I'm a bit confused about this. Hagi is a city in Japan. Buncheong is a Korean word meaning, I think, powder green or "gray-green ceramics decorated with powder." (according to http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pnch/hd_pnch.htm). I thought mishima (also named for a city) is the Japanese word for buncheong and refers to the technique of overglazing with the green tinted glaze. (Celedon, in the Korean pottery sense, is doing the same with a blue glaze).

This is interesting: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1983.557.2

Mishima is slip inlaid into the stampings that form the designs. Also seems derived from buncheong wares of Joseon period. Glazing in buncheong is done with slip as I have been told by Korean potters.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3210
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Tead Off » Mar 22nd, '13, 22:24

TIM wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
TIM wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
brandon wrote:Thanks Tea Pals!

Mr. F, can't wait to join my French pen pals at your well appointed table.

I'm assuming your bowl is buncheong. If it is, it is slip glazed and prone to chipping and flaking. A certain delicacy will be needed. Could you ascertain the age from the seller?


not a buncheong, but hagi.

Brandon replied it is buncheong, Joseon period according to the seller. I believe Hagi originated with Korean buncheong wares. Maybe difficult to tell apart in earlier periods. This one seems to be an homage to the famous one in the Japanese museum. That marking on the outside of the bowl is often repeated in Korean bowls.


Really Brandon?

brandon wrote:You are right on of course TO. The seller being Japanese described it as kohiki, their term for the hagi slip application. Matcha will be reserved for special ocassions by people with real training in that art - not by myself of course! The energy of a tea gathering infuses the bowl. Rest of the time it will be drinking aged puer. The seller described the period as Joseon, do not know personally. The feeling of the bowl is amazing but as I mentioned it is somewhat dormant due to being out of use for awhile.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3210
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby TIM » Mar 22nd, '13, 22:30

Tead Off wrote:
edkrueger wrote:I'm a bit confused about this. Hagi is a city in Japan. Buncheong is a Korean word meaning, I think, powder green or "gray-green ceramics decorated with powder." (according to http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pnch/hd_pnch.htm). I thought mishima (also named for a city) is the Japanese word for buncheong and refers to the technique of overglazing with the green tinted glaze. (Celedon, in the Korean pottery sense, is doing the same with a blue glaze).

This is interesting: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1983.557.2

Mishima is slip inlaid into the stampings that form the designs. Also seems derived from buncheong wares of Joseon period. Glazing in buncheong is done with slip as I have been told by Korean potters.


Would you label this as buncheong also:
http://www.themandarinstea.blogspot.com ... e.html?m=1

Are buncheong in Korean refer to "pattern" and "color'?
User avatar
TIM
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2042
Joined: Apr 4th, '0
Location: NYC

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Tead Off » Mar 22nd, '13, 22:46

TIM wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
edkrueger wrote:I'm a bit confused about this. Hagi is a city in Japan. Buncheong is a Korean word meaning, I think, powder green or "gray-green ceramics decorated with powder." (according to http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pnch/hd_pnch.htm). I thought mishima (also named for a city) is the Japanese word for buncheong and refers to the technique of overglazing with the green tinted glaze. (Celedon, in the Korean pottery sense, is doing the same with a blue glaze).

This is interesting: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1983.557.2

Mishima is slip inlaid into the stampings that form the designs. Also seems derived from buncheong wares of Joseon period. Glazing in buncheong is done with slip as I have been told by Korean potters.


Would you label this as buncheong also:
http://www.themandarinstea.blogspot.com ... e.html?m=1

Are buncheong in Korean refer to "pattern" and "color'?

I believe those are considered Korean and buncheong. Arthur Park would know for sure. I have been told that buncheong refers to the clay that is used plus the slip glazing techniques. Clay is iron rich as the Koreans say to differentiate it from pure porcelain. The celadons were not made from iron rich clay. The potters that the Japanese indentured during their occupation of Joseon Korea and brought to Japan introduced this type of pottery to the Japanese who copied and revered this style. It's often said that the best Japanese bowls in their museums are Korean made.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3210
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby TIM » Mar 22nd, '13, 23:04

Tead Off wrote:
TIM wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
edkrueger wrote:I'm a bit confused about this. Hagi is a city in Japan. Buncheong is a Korean word meaning, I think, powder green or "gray-green ceramics decorated with powder." (according to http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/hd/pnch/hd_pnch.htm). I thought mishima (also named for a city) is the Japanese word for buncheong and refers to the technique of overglazing with the green tinted glaze. (Celedon, in the Korean pottery sense, is doing the same with a blue glaze).

This is interesting: http://www.metmuseum.org/toah/works-of-art/1983.557.2

Mishima is slip inlaid into the stampings that form the designs. Also seems derived from buncheong wares of Joseon period. Glazing in buncheong is done with slip as I have been told by Korean potters.


Would you label this as buncheong also:
http://www.themandarinstea.blogspot.com ... e.html?m=1

Are buncheong in Korean refer to "pattern" and "color'?

I believe those are considered Korean and buncheong. Arthur Park would know for sure. I have been told that buncheong refers to the clay that is used plus the slip glazing techniques. Clay is iron rich as the Koreans say to differentiate it from pure porcelain. The celadons were not made from iron rich clay. The potters that the Japanese indentured during their occupation of Joseon Korea and brought to Japan introduced this type of pottery to the Japanese who copied and revered this style. It's often said that the best Japanese bowls in their museums are Korean made.


I think you should do more research and find out since you are carrying buncheong. If the one I'm linking and Brandon's daiwan are both buncheong, we will not made the call. Buncheong are perhaps finished with a clear glaze and ours do not show that kind of a treatment.
User avatar
TIM
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2042
Joined: Apr 4th, '0
Location: NYC

Re: The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Tead Off » Mar 22nd, '13, 23:52

The buncheong I carry are clear glazed over slip. They are first dipped into slip, then bisque fired. Clear glaze is then applied and fired. The wares are fired twice. According to Seong il, Joseon buncheong wares also were clear glazed but not bisque fired. They were slip dipped and then clear glazed and wood fired one time. They were also fired at a lower temp than what Seong il and Eung Chul fire at. The kind of clear glazing that was used was different than what is used today. Even the clear glazing that Seong il uses is different than the clear glazing Eung Chul uses. They get different color and are fired at different temps. Seong il uses more wood ash in his clear glaze. He insists that during Joseon period, they used clear glaze in buncheong wares. The old ones show the degradation of the slip glazing and then you get a more matt finish. Some would say 'patina'.

Buncheong, both modern and old, also change color from use. This is similar to Hagi wares. Even Seong il's buncheong bowls are subject to this and will show degradation to the surface even though they are fired at a higher temp than Joseon wares.

If you want to know whether your bowls are considered Japanese or Korean, I would ask Arthur Park. They are certainly Korean style to me. He should know the technicalities to differentiate between the two.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3210
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Abracadaver! » Mar 22nd, '13, 23:53

User avatar
Abracadaver!
 
Posts: 197
Joined: Jul 2nd, '0
Location: Brooklyn, NY

The unofficial/official Korean Teaware Topic

Postby Abracadaver! » Mar 22nd, '13, 23:57

TIM wrote:http://dawan-chawan-chassabal.blogspot.com/2010/11/powdery-matsudaira-revisited.html?m=1

http://dawan-chawan-chassabal.blogspot. ... o.html?m=1



Oops, I completely missed this post of yours, Tim. Sorry to duplicate your efforts.
User avatar
Abracadaver!
 
Posts: 197
Joined: Jul 2nd, '0
Location: Brooklyn, NY

PreviousNext

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation