Show off your Kettle!!


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby kyarazen » Jul 12th, '14, 15:15

Pig Hog wrote:What do you guys think of the way certain tetsubin work with certain teapots?

Hojo-san is very adamant that my soon-to-be Kunzan tetsubin is best used with Banko or bizen yaki but will not work well with reduction fired pots.

While I don't disagree with his far more expert opinion, I wonder whether everyone here pays such meticulous attention to what teaware combo they use and how much it affect the flavour of the tea for good or for worse?


actually it could be a simple logic.. but might be to simple for many to accept.

tea leaves contain a lot of minerals together with other plant based compounds/biological materials. theoretically if you squeeze the tea leaves of all juices, remove all biological materials and all that plant based compounds, you should just be left with "mineral water"...

so, by brewing tea leaves with the purest waters i.e. distilled, one is just diluting the tea minerals.

by lv yu's cha-jing, why this water is best for this tea etc, and all that descriptions may be half fantasy half reality. if you brew a tea using water from where the tea is planted, the mineral profile should be similar, you dont really dilute or affect the over all proportion/type of minerals.

by boiling water in iron vessels that are reduction fired, redox reactions will occur, some of the minerals and anions such as chlorides, sulphates will crash out and start scaling up the kettle walls. this reaction results in changes in the water's mineral content, for good or for worse. the other redox reactions occur when the water/tea stuff interact with the teapot material.

different makers have different sources of ores, different purity, grades, the composition of the tetsubin will differ, so due to different metallurgy it will affect water differently.

the other aspect that most people dont consider, is the shape of the tetsubin as well, water boiled in it forms a thermal gradient, hottest being the bottom of the tetsubin where constant heat is applied, coolest at the top (a few degrees off). so different tetsubin size, shape, diff temp effects also affect the tea brewing.

there are many dimensions to tea, i drink coarse tea at work, cheaper, lower grade teas, distilled water brewed, but i also do spend a little on good tea, nice tea toys like pots, kettles and all that. it can be fun to really explore tea on the level of taste, the texture of the tea on the tongue is at least 30+% important. there are a lot of chinese literatures that i had came across on all the inner workings of tea tasting/drinking, i'm just wondering if there are sufficient translations of some of these concepts because it is so seldom debated

the overall mineral and tea compounds leached from the tea will affect the tea texture, simply because of how the brew momentarily coats the surface of the tongue (so that you will perceive that its soft, creamy, smooth, instead of tingly, rough, multiple areas of the tongue slightly unhappy till you swallow)

(question your tea master today to get better explanation on the topic! ask him, How do one drink tea?)

i believe hojo pays a lot of attention to this matching because the worst thing for merchants is to have people complain that this tea is bad, not of quality. when buying tea in china on the surface, the chinese merchants will have all tricks and ways to present to you a nice tasting brew, delicious enough to make you plonk down money and buy off tens of kilograms to resell. and when "good" tea doesnt easily exist in large quantities, problems will arise when people are unable to replicate good tastes at home. so hojo does super sealed storage, mild vacumn, oxygen absorber, just to preserve the qualities of the tea as much as what he gets/tastes on site, and will also be able to prescribe a condition, type of tea ware, material type, firing type, water type, kettle type.

oh no i'm getting long winded.. falling asleep as i'm writing this...

just remember one thing..

Good tea is always very forgiving, the tea is chock full of flavour, aroma, minerals, well process and made, even average quality water can create something spectacular. Good tea masters are able to push out flavours, aroma and good taste from more average teas with conditions. But nothing can ever rescue a bad tea :)
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Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Pig Hog » Jul 12th, '14, 18:27

That was actually an interesting read. Thanks for that post!
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Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby devilducklings » Jul 13th, '14, 06:49

Thanks kyarazen, this is one of the best tea writings I ever read.
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Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Pig Hog » Aug 6th, '14, 13:46

Proud owner of a new Kunzan tetsubin. Photo's later.

Anyone got any care tips?
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Show off your Kettle!!

Postby blairswhitaker » Aug 6th, '14, 23:45

Looking forward to seeing it pig hog.
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Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Fuut » Aug 7th, '14, 10:08

Pig Hog wrote:Proud owner of a new Kunzan tetsubin. Photo's later.

Anyone got any care tips?


Apart from some pointers that were addressed during this topic,
- don't use a 'wet' flame.
- make sure you dry the inside with a soft cloth after using it.

I don't have anything else :) Can't wait to see your tetsubin!
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Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Pig Hog » Aug 7th, '14, 12:27

I've been using a portable hot plate for it and am allowing the heat to dry it off when done.

I think most things have been covered but was just checking for anything new. Incidentally, Hojo-san says it's fine to use them over a flame if you don't mind the surface changing colour...

Want to get some photos in the daylight so you may have to wait until tomorrow!
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Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Poseidon » Aug 7th, '14, 12:36

Dont freak out about how rare this beaut' is. :lol: :lol: :lol:


Image

I think im going to get one of these for the ol' bday this year.

Image
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Postby bonescwa » Aug 7th, '14, 15:42

I see that glass one at TJ Max for like 20 bucks, I think that's probably cheaper than you can find online but I'm not sure
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Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Pig Hog » Aug 13th, '14, 17:39

I must apologise, as I have photos for you but I can't post them straight from my phone and I've not yet had the time to edit them.

The tetsubin, however, is great -- it's turned from the new looking black/grey iron in the current photos, to a more used looking brown and there's a hint of rust starting to develop on the inside.

I'm guessing this is all normal stuff. After I'm finished using it, I empty it out and put it back on the heat for it to dry out, then I leave it to cool. Is there anything else I should be doing? Cleaning, wiping or the like or is this the generally accepted routine?
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Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Fuut » Aug 14th, '14, 04:20

Pig Hog wrote:I'm guessing this is all normal stuff. After I'm finished using it, I empty it out and put it back on the heat for it to dry out, then I leave it to cool. Is there anything else I should be doing? Cleaning, wiping or the like or is this the generally accepted routine?


If i'm not mistaken you should never have an empty tetsubin on the fire. Just dry the insides with a soft material.
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Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby tst » Aug 14th, '14, 04:44

I've read placing it on the hot plate for several minutes to help evaporate off any remaining water molecules is fine. Any potential danger would be if you were to put water back into a hot/heated vessel ... this can cause cracking.

This is my understanding at least. I'm sure others will chime in.
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Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Fuut » Aug 14th, '14, 06:47

tst wrote:I've read placing it on the hot plate for several minutes to help evaporate off any remaining water molecules is fine. Any potential danger would be if you were to put water back into a hot/heated vessel ... this can cause cracking.


I thought it had to do with putting an empty iron piece on the flame will damage the outer iron layer protecting the piece.. Please someone who knows his beezwax chime in.
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Re: Show off your Kettle!!

Postby blairswhitaker » Aug 14th, '14, 07:13

Fuut wrote:
tst wrote:I've read placing it on the hot plate for several minutes to help evaporate off any remaining water molecules is fine. Any potential danger would be if you were to put water back into a hot/heated vessel ... this can cause cracking.


I thought it had to do with putting an empty iron piece on the flame will damage the outer iron layer protecting the piece.. Please someone who knows his beezwax chime in.


As has been discussed here and elsewhere, putting an iron piece on any open flame is not really good for it. avoid this at all times. the kettles are cast as a single piece of iron, their is no difference in the iron on the outside vs. the inside or anywhere else in the kettle. sometimes they have an urushi coating on the inside and/or outside but this is a lacquer material not iron.

Most of these kettle have one or two small urushi plugs in the base, the casting method leaves one or two small holes in the kettle and then these are filled with a mixture of iron sand and urushi. not all are built this way but most. This stuff does not deal well with being exposed to raw flame, but it can last for a very long time over electric or charcoal flame, though it quickly degrades if places on the heating source while the kettle is empty.

what is safe to do, and I recommend, is after removing from the heating element (not a live flame but something electric) is to turn off the hotplate, dump out the water, pat down with a clean cloth, then return to the still warm hotplate for a bit to remove the water inside.
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Show off your Kettle!!

Postby Pig Hog » Aug 14th, '14, 07:20

blairswhitaker wrote:
what is safe to do, and I recommend, is after removing from the heating element (not a live flame but something electric) is to turn off the hotplate, dump out the water, pat down with a clean cloth, then return to the still warm hotplate for a bit to remove the water inside.


This is exactly what I'm doing, until the water has evaporated (always pools at the bottom of the spout).
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