Western Teapot Question

Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby Alex » Jan 19th, '13, 14:00

brunogm wrote:
Alex wrote:Its referred to as "Loose leaf" on the box.


This tea is too broken. The broken leaves would go straight through my grandmother pot filter.



Yeah it does on all them. That's why part of every English tea service will have a filter for cups. Teabags really took off in the 50s and so the filters work to stop the bag from entering the spout.

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Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby Alex » Jan 19th, '13, 14:01

jayinhk wrote:The guys are dead on the money re: British people and loose leaf--it's from the era of tea cosies and egg cups.


My Great Grandad use to wear a tea cosy on his head so he could stick his hearing aid out of the spout hole in cold weather. Genius :mrgreen:

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Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby brunogm » Jan 19th, '13, 14:40

Forget it... I asked my parents. This is a Russian teapot.

My Grandmother inherited silverware from white Russians that stayed at my great Grand Mother's, after they fled Russia. As a matter of fact, there is a Russian double headed eagle hallmark on the bottom. Given this, the teapot was made before the soviet revolution.

The filter was added afterwards. It is not as tea stained as the rest of the inside and looks made in a different material.

This is a teapot with both an interesting history and great personal sentimental value. I am going to bring it to a jeweler for full identification. Unfortunately, I will never probably never use it. First, it is way too big. Second, I do not know how to clean it.

Anybody has a tip for cleaning old silver teapots? I mean the inside, not the outside.

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Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby Alex » Jan 19th, '13, 14:53

brunogm wrote:Forget it... I asked my parents. This is a Russian teapot.

My Grandmother inherited silverware from white Russians that stayed at my great Grand Mother's, after they fled Russia. As a matter of fact, there is a Russian double headed eagle hallmark on the bottom. Given this, the teapot was made before the soviet revolution.

The filter was added afterwards. It is not as tea stained as the rest of the inside and looks made in a different material.

This is a teapot with both an interesting history and great personal sentimental value. I am going to bring it to a jeweler for full identification. Unfortunately, I will never probably never use it. First, it is way too big. Second, I do not know how to clean it.

Anybody has a tip for cleaning old silver teapots? I mean the inside, not the outside.


Sounds awesome. Love to see a picture!

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Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby rdl » Jan 19th, '13, 19:05

brunogm wrote:Forget it... I asked my parents. This is a Russian teapot.First, it is way too big. Second, I do not know how to clean it.
Anybody has a tip for cleaning old silver teapots? I mean the inside, not the outside.

the samovar was the traditional russian method so i wonder if this pot was used for english style tea preparation. as i mentioned, and i am sure this is by far not always the case, nice silver tea pots (the same with the fine thin porcelain pots that you wouldn't want to pour boiling water into) were used to hold poured off tea from a simpler ceramic tea pot (kept in the kitchen) as the silver was taken out to the sitting room on a tea tray for serving. or as mentioned, a filter was used at the time it was poured into cups.
it's easy to clean, just use a lot of baking soda in water and let it sit a few hours, then use a rag and wipe the inside to get the remaining stain off. you shouldn't need more than that.
even if it is big, and you're drinking english style tea, you can always use a pot to steep with and pour off into this nice one and set it out where you drink. in any case - it seems you have a family treasure. enjoy it.

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Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby rdl » Jan 19th, '13, 19:08

Alex wrote:
jayinhk wrote:The guys are dead on the money re: British people and loose leaf--it's from the era of tea cosies and egg cups.


My Great Grandad use to wear a tea cosy on his head so he could stick his hearing aid out of the spout hole in cold weather. Genius :mrgreen:

see the advantages of belonging to the over-50 crowd :lol:

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Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby ImmortaliTEA » Jan 19th, '13, 21:05

rdl wrote:
Alex wrote:
jayinhk wrote:The guys are dead on the money re: British people and loose leaf--it's from the era of tea cosies and egg cups.


My Great Grandad use to wear a tea cosy on his head so he could stick his hearing aid out of the spout hole in cold weather. Genius :mrgreen:

see the advantages of belonging to the over-50 crowd :lol:


Lol!

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Re: Western Teapot Question

Postby brunogm » Jan 20th, '13, 05:01

Thank you for the baking soda cleaning tip.

This pot is a sentimental treasure, not a monetary treasure. Silverware is generally only worth its weight in silver.

Which gave me an idea for an alternative to clay pots... Silver is said to alter water taste in a way that is favorable for tea. Old silver pots are often beautiful. Many of these pots are cheaper than authentic Yixing pots of the same age, and unlike Yixing, it is difficult to fake them and easy to authentify them.

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