Water temp


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Water temp

Postby yalokinh » Sep 26th, '13, 01:09

How do i estimate water to be 150°F without a thermometer?
I've gotten really good about the higher temperatures, but have no idea about the lower ones
User avatar
yalokinh
 
Posts: 282
Joined: Feb 19th, '
Location: Florida, Minnesota

Re: water temp

Postby Tead Off » Sep 26th, '13, 08:46

yalokinh wrote:How do i estimate water to be 150°F without a thermometer?
I've gotten really good about the higher temperatures, but have no idea about the lower ones

Much easier if you think metrically. :D
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3403
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: water temp

Postby Chip » Sep 26th, '13, 08:59

yalokinh wrote:How do i estimate water to be 150°F without a thermometer?
I've gotten really good about the higher temperatures, but have no idea about the lower ones

Are you talking about when the water is in a kettle heating or when it has been poured into a cooling vessel (such as a Yuzamashi)?
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: water temp

Postby yalokinh » Sep 26th, '13, 10:44

Cooler, how hot is it to the touch?
User avatar
yalokinh
 
Posts: 282
Joined: Feb 19th, '
Location: Florida, Minnesota

Re: water temp

Postby Chip » Sep 26th, '13, 12:22

OK, then I would suggest experimenting for yourself. What feels one way to one person may feel quite differently to another.

Break out your thermometer, and feel how it feels at various temps, though the material and thickness will play a factor as well.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: water temp

Postby yalokinh » Sep 26th, '13, 13:03

Right, i would, but i dont have one. A trip to the store will have to follow
User avatar
yalokinh
 
Posts: 282
Joined: Feb 19th, '
Location: Florida, Minnesota

Re: water temp

Postby Chip » Sep 26th, '13, 14:19

yalokinh wrote:Right, i would, but i dont have one. A trip to the store will have to follow

This will help you gauge it pretty closely by hand ...

I would suggest getting a decent digital one. They are pretty inexpensive, but avoid the Taylor entry level one, really gave inaccurate readings. And you can always use a good digital food thermometer. :mrgreen:
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: water temp

Postby theredbaron » Sep 26th, '13, 19:07

yalokinh wrote:How do i estimate water to be 150°F without a thermometer?
I've gotten really good about the higher temperatures, but have no idea about the lower ones



My suggestion would be to go by touch. Don't just be hung up on numbers. Learn how to feel it. After some time experimenting you will instinctively get things right - not just water temperature, but also the right tea/water ratios, and the right steeping time. This will also make room to make adjustments while you progress, instead of trying to follow some standardized formula.
theredbaron
 
Posts: 464
Joined: Aug 1st, '1
Location: Bangkok

Re: water temp

Postby AdamMY » Sep 26th, '13, 19:08

I don't mean to joke, wait yes I do. As you live in Florida it might be pour the boiling water into a cooler, and go do something for 20-30 minutes then it should be there :shock: :lol: . Unless of course you keep your AC cranked up like many people in the south, then it very well could be roughly 2-4 minutes depending on the vessel it is held in.

Honestly I often say that cool weather is for Gyokuro, but I have learned to admit to myself, that is mostly because in hot weather it seems I am waiting forever for the water to cool.
User avatar
AdamMY
 
Posts: 2359
Joined: Jul 22nd, '
Location: Capital of the Mitten

Re: water temp

Postby gingkoseto » Sep 26th, '13, 22:01

150F is about 65.5C. That's a tricky temperature that I learned about on something else. For most people, that's about the threshold temperature when you could lay your hands on the container for extended period of time without feeling scorched. Or you could measure your own tolerance temperature, which I guess won't be far off from this point.
For tea brewing, I wouldn't take so much trouble to measure :wink:
User avatar
gingkoseto
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 2141
Joined: Sep 24th, '
Location: Boston, MA

Re: water temp

Postby Teaism » Sep 26th, '13, 23:30

gingkoseto wrote:150F is about 65.5C.
For tea brewing, I wouldn't take so much trouble to measure :wink:


+1

Likewise for driving, just glance the odometer to feel but not particular on the exact speed. If need to be accurate, I would get a car with cruize control.

Generally you may like to focus on the brew and calibrate from there rather than focusing on the exact temp.

Cheers!
User avatar
Teaism
 
Posts: 652
Joined: Jan 5th, '1

Re: water temp

Postby chrl42 » Sep 26th, '13, 23:53

Teaism wrote:
gingkoseto wrote:150F is about 65.5C.
For tea brewing, I wouldn't take so much trouble to measure :wink:


+1

Likewise for driving, just glance the odometer to feel but not particular on the exact speed. If need to be accurate, I would get a car with cruize control.

Generally you may like to focus on the brew and calibrate from there rather than focusing on the exact temp.

Cheers!

+2
Temp for tea is a relative factor, for example

a temp to brew should go different in summer than in winter, dense clays like Zhuni needs a lower temp or leaves will be cooked. Also relates to thickness of a pot

Calculating all, 'temps for tea' from books are just to be advised..it's like cooking..someday we don't need directions or a teaspoon :)
User avatar
chrl42
 
Posts: 1519
Joined: Mar 22nd, '
Location: Beijing

Re: water temp

Postby yalokinh » Sep 27th, '13, 03:21

AdamMY wrote:I don't mean to joke, wait yes I do. As you live in Florida it might be pour the boiling water into a cooler, and go do something for 20-30 minutes then it should be there :shock: :lol: . Unless of course you keep your AC cranked up like many people in the south, then it very well could be roughly 2-4 minutes depending on the vessel it is held in.

Honestly I often say that cool weather is for Gyokuro, but I have learned to admit to myself, that is mostly because in hot weather it seems I am waiting forever for the water to cool.


Lol!
Yeah im trying to by touch, but i have no idea of knowing at first because i have no reference point, the thermometer will be just to get aquainted with the exact temp
User avatar
yalokinh
 
Posts: 282
Joined: Feb 19th, '
Location: Florida, Minnesota

Re: water temp

Postby theredbaron » Sep 27th, '13, 05:01

yalokinh wrote:Lol!
Yeah im trying to by touch, but i have no idea of knowing at first because i have no reference point, the thermometer will be just to get aquainted with the exact temp


You do have a reference point: taste.

Experiment with different configurations, regarding temp as felt., ratio, time, and see what brews the best tea. The best tea will not be brewed when you learned to follow standards based on numbers, but when the procedure becomes instinct.
Honing your instincts is part of the learning process of tea appreciation. Thermometers and scales may appear at first glance as a short cut, but can easily turn into a hindrance as it is too easy to fall into the trap of depending on them.
theredbaron
 
Posts: 464
Joined: Aug 1st, '1
Location: Bangkok

Re: water temp

Postby Chip » Sep 27th, '13, 08:04

... no arguments with any of the above comments, however there is nothing wrong with using a thermometer if that is what someone wants to do.

chrl42 wrote:Temp for tea is a relative factor, for example

a temp to brew should go different in summer than in winter, dense clays like Zhuni needs a lower temp or leaves will be cooked. Also relates to thickness of a pot

I agree with this completely. But then even "the feel" must be ... different taking into account these factors.

Bottom line, brew how you like, like how you brew ... and if you are getting the results you want, then it matters little to me how you get there. As long as you are enjoying the experience of brewing as well as drinking.

This is always a controversial topic, instrumentation versus feel.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22110
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation