Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.


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Re: Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.

Postby AdamMY » Jan 24th, '14, 21:22

Really enjoying these Peeler films, but I think I have seen them before, but still loving them!
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Re: Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.

Postby Saladin » Jan 24th, '14, 22:28

Japanese pottery was new and exciting when these films were made and had a huge influence on American Studio pottery. You can see it in the work featured in those American Peeler films. I think brown 70's stoneware pottery looks the way it did because it was so influenced by Hamada and Japanese pottery. I could be wrong of course as I was born in 74. :D
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Re: Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.

Postby JBaymore » Jan 25th, '14, 00:27

No, you have it absolutely correct there, John. My generation and the generation before me "grew up on" Leach, Hamada, and Yanagi.

When I started clay Leach's "The Potters Book" was the 'bible'....followed closely by Dan Rhodes' "Clay and Glazes for the Potter".

Sperry's "Village Potters of Onda" was a KEY in the decisions that dictated my life's arc.

best,

..................john

BTW: Are you familiar with Brian Moran's sociological Doctoral thesis (turned into a book) on the Potters of Onda? GREAT read. It is sociology really, not pottery......... amazing look into the life of the village. (Some TeaChatters might find it interesting also.) Bottom line..... the life of the village is totally dependent on the amouint of flow of water in the stream that runs thru the town; it touches all aspects of their life there.
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Re: Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.

Postby Saladin » Jan 25th, '14, 17:27

John, I'm glad I'm not imagining this! I work in a gallery that has been showing American ceramics for over 40 years. I've always tried discussing the virtues of Japanese pottery to my coworkers, and when I showed Hamada's pottery to one of the owners she said "looks just like 70's pottery". I was shocked and dismissed this ignorant perspective, until it occurred to me that American 70's studio pottery does in a superficial way resemble certain types of Japanese pottery. I gave her Susan Peterson's wonderful Hamada book to read to show how Hamada and Leach influenced western pottery at this time. When I look at some of Kanjiro Kawai's pots I really sometimes think " cheesy 60's and 70' studio ware".
Anyone interested in this stuff should read this wonderful book, available at almost every library. This new version is much improved though.

http://www.amazon.com/Shoji-Hamada-Pott ... 1574981986
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Re: Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.

Postby JBaymore » Jan 25th, '14, 19:03

Peterson's "Shoji Hamada; A Potters Way and Work" is a wonderfully written piece. Always loved it.

Nope, you are not imagining it at all. Hamada, Leach, and Yanagi had a profound impact on American ceramics in the 50's, 60's and into the early 70s.

Start with some Bauhaus influence....... throw in the Japanese viewpoint (with troops returning from Occupied Japan also), ......... add a dash of Abstract Expressionism with a hint of Dada, .........let Volkous loose to stir the pot....... and stuff starts shifting.

best,

..................john

BTW: Here's the book link : http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/ ... w&sr=&qid=
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Re: Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.

Postby Saladin » Jan 26th, '14, 14:58

Thanks John I'll check out that Onda book. Another one I like is Shards by Garth Clark, particularly the essays about the WW2 vets who went off to study ceramics in college with the Gi Bill.
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Re: Fun vintage Japanese pottery films.

Postby paul haigh » Feb 3rd, '14, 09:10

Pioneer Pottery (Cardew) is the book I cannot get enough of. Phil Rogers' "Ash Glazes" is another. OK- slightly off topic, but those two spark my imagination every time I pick them up. (The Rogers book is not short on eye candy)
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