Yixing pots from a shipwreck.


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

Postby Drax » Nov 8th, '08, 11:29

betta wrote:Dissolving ionic solids and reversing crystal formation could be done easily. That's what we learn in highschool. However I hope you'd take into account the capillary effect in the deposition. A capillary condensation (and thus also deposition) will create hysteresis, not all of the deposited molecule could be easily removed out of pores. Otherwise we don't have to replace any adsorbent after some TON.


I find this concept fascinating. Could you please direct me to some place where I can learn more about it?
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Postby betta » Nov 8th, '08, 11:33

I'll send you via PM since it's out of the tea topic.
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Postby teaguy » Nov 12th, '08, 01:22

My tea master has a pot recovered from one of these wrecks (not sure which one), and he's now conditioning it for making tea. He thinks it will take at least a month or so before it's ready. I'll post more when I learn more about how he's treating it.
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Postby Drax » Mar 16th, '09, 17:49

teaguy wrote:My tea master has a pot recovered from one of these wrecks (not sure which one), and he's now conditioning it for making tea. He thinks it will take at least a month or so before it's ready. I'll post more when I learn more about how he's treating it.


Hey teaguy, did you ever find out the steps he was going through to condition the pot?

By the way, it looks like they've restocked with more pots. . .[/url]
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Postby hop_goblin » Mar 16th, '09, 19:58

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Postby Salsero » Mar 16th, '09, 23:36

Great clip, Hop, thanks!
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Postby tjausti » Mar 17th, '09, 07:39

Ser. No. D-793

This teapot is intact except for a chipped spout and a very small chip on the inside of the lid. The base shows the mark of Shou Yaolan a famous teapot maker. In addition to the mark there is a sea shell in the bottom of the pot, confirming its stay on the sea bed.



this is the one I would want.... I would be buying it solely for the purpose of having/displaying it. the fact that a shellfish grew to maturity in this pot (assuming the reason the shell is still in there is it is too large to remove) would make a very cool conversation item. :D
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Postby teaguy » Mar 17th, '09, 12:26

Hi Drax,

Actually, he's tried a lot of different things with it, but has pretty much given up on ever using it to brew tea. Maybe it needs another 200 years soaking if fresh water in a lake somewhere! lol

His opinion is that those recovered pots are more valuable as a record of the times. From ship's records and other data they can pinpoint within a fairly narrow time frame when the tea ware was made, so those pots provide a good base line for comparing other pots to help date things more accurately.

The porcelain wares would probably be more practical for actually brewing, as they would be easier to clean up.

I'm curious myself as to what the taste difference would be, and if it would really ruin the tea or just alter it a bit - Master Tsai is a much more sophisticated tea drinker than I am, and perhaps he picks out subtle qualities that wouldn't bother a less sensitive palate such as my own.

Would love to hear from anyone actually using a recovered pot. I'm tempted to splurge on one of the cheaper ones myself, just to have around.
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Postby Drax » Mar 19th, '09, 21:33

Hey, great extra info, thanks for the link, hop, and the results of the tea master's efforts, teaguy.... very interesting.
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Salt is the least of your worries.

Postby Intuit » Mar 19th, '09, 22:16

The rate of contaminant efflux with vary with physical and chemical properties of the clay interior and the overlying seawater.

There are very interesting microbial critters that could inhabit the micro-pore surface, living nicely off the bound ions, both ionic and covalent.

Methinks there would indeed be an odd flavor to tea made in these pots.

Their value lies in their age, provenance and unusual marine storage conditions.

Tek Sing Treasure:
http://www.worldcollectorsnet.com/magaz ... s18p4.html

"It was during the relatively peaceful Ming times that this fertile area gave rise to a rich and cultured elite society, whose traditions included the taking of tea. These merchants, officials and scholars as well as aristocrats required the finest tea and by the sixteenth century there was a great appreciation of the red-bodied teapots produced at Yixing. It became a matter not only of pleasure but also of status to order - or indeed sometimes to help the potter to produce - the finest possible teapots. In Ming times and later, inscriptions were of great importance. They could be extracts from poems both old and modern, and in some cases the simple but elegant forms of the vessels were no more than vehicles for fine calligraphy.

The tea-drinkers of Jiangsu and Zhejiang provinces eschewed what they deemed the more gaudy decorative products of Jingdezhen, and the gold and silver pots favored in some quarters. On the practical side, these unglazed pots kept the tea warm for longer, retained aroma better and were usually small enough to help avoid wasting an expensive commodity. The eighteenth century saw a decline in interest in tea and the quality of Yixing teapots, but there was a revival at the start of the nineteenth century, though earlier heights were never reached again.

All the teapots from the cargo have the traditional elegant simplicity of these wares. Some of the shapes have the maker’s name and others have poetic inscriptions on their bases. While there is a long history of exporting Yixing teapots, it is perhaps surprising to find inscribed ones in the cargo. Presumably they were destined for some of the island’s emigrant Chinese communities, where such cultural objects would be appreciated among certain classes. It is interesting that one of the Yixing teapots recovered from the Nanking cargo, salvaged in 1985 and whose wares date from circa 1750, appears very similar to the bullet-shaped teapots in the present cargo. Given the small number, it is not impossible that the latter were ‘old stock’ recovered from some warehouse, but it is more likely that some of the older types continued to be made alongside newer, more refined versions that were part of the revival."
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Postby danluie » Mar 21st, '09, 03:39

I use my shipwreck teapots to make tea with friends always. 
We don't taste any "weird" sodium salt. Instead, they brew excellent taste of tea.

Dissolving ionic solids and reversing crystal formation could be done easily. That's what we learn in highschool. However I hope you'd take into account the capillary effect in the deposition. A capillary condensation (and thus also deposition) will create hysteresis, not all of the deposited molecule could be easily removed out of pores. Otherwise we don't have to replace any adsorbent after some TON.

 
Iagree some yixing teapots from shipwreck as Beta mentioned above can't be used to make tea. But there are still some teapots in good condition and the body have not effected by deposited molecule.

I will take some pictures of shipwreck teapot and post to teacha next time.
[/b]
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Postby Thirsty Daruma » Mar 26th, '09, 17:32

This sort of sets off my "private ownership of art" alarm. I know a cracked Ming yixing isn't as precious s say, a Picasso, but I'd much rather have this on display somewhere for the public rather than being forcibly cared for until it could make tea of dubious flavor.

That aside, the real interesting part for me is the salvaging method and market. Fascinating that these have been retrieved though.
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