The unofficial/official HAGI topic!


Discussion on virtually any teaware related item.

How many Hagi are enough?

1
20
15%
2-3
21
15%
4-5
14
10%
6-7
3
2%
8-10
2
1%
11 or more
5
4%
Infinity ... always room for one more
72
53%
 
Total votes : 137

Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby daidokorocha » Aug 28th, '14, 11:25

Pig Hog wrote:Posted with tapatalk...not sure if I can change anything. Will look when I'm at home.

EDIT: just the end tags? Won't that just make them random links? Will they even work?


They didn't post as pictures, but rather links where the [/img portion ended up as part of the link for some reason. So when you click on the links they end up being "www.link.com[/img" with [img] and the bracket at the end staying behind on the page as regular text.
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The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Pig Hog » Aug 28th, '14, 11:44

Try now?
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The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Pig Hog » Aug 28th, '14, 17:09

[img]http://tapatalk.imageshack.com/v2/14/08/28/0c8bdc51913d13e89a6fc262de3d3a12.jpg[/img]
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby daidokorocha » Aug 28th, '14, 17:36

Links on the prior page work now!
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby rdl » Sep 7th, '14, 06:18

Tead Off wrote:The reason I asked the question is that the glazing on this item is extremely glass-like. Maybe it's just the photo, but it looks like this was fired higher than most Hagi ware even though the clay is local. I could be mistaken.

Hagi was a direct result of the Korean style brought with the Koreans that were indentured to the Japanese several hundred years back.


Tead Off, traditional hagiyaki will resemble this. But if you can get a copy of the Hagi Association of Ceramic Artists book (I was hoping to find a new addition to buy during my visit to Hagi last week but it is still the same 2006 version) you will see a vast array of styles and techniques that are quite modern and won't resemble traditional hagiyaki.
The range even of shape and design would make one second guess its origin. But they are all hagiyaki ceramic artists. Miwa Kyusetu is a perfect example of this. Take a look at http://www.e-yakimono.net/html/miwa-kyu ... -2003.html or on-line for his work.
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Tead Off » Sep 7th, '14, 13:23

Thanks for the link. I doubt most of us would categorize his gold chawan as what we think of as Hagi. This was what I was referring to earlier. If a potter lives and works in the town of Hagi, he may not work in that traditional style or maybe not even use the clays and glazes typical of Hagi. If you do use other clays/glazes, do they exile you? :D
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby rdl » Sep 7th, '14, 15:15

Tead Off wrote:If you do use other clays/glazes, do they exile you? :D

As Miwa Kyusetu is/was President, Hagi Association of Ceramic Artists I guess you can stay even if you stray from tradition. :wink:
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Andy S. » Sep 11th, '14, 09:13

Not a big fan of Hagi, but 2-3 three of them is quite enough to share an authentic matcha experience with friends, I like to drink cold tea rather then hot (well living in asia you prefer every drink as cold as possible to fend of the daily hot weather).
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby rdl » Sep 11th, '14, 10:55

enzomatcha wrote:Not a big fan of Hagi, but 2-3 three of them is quite enough to share an authentic matcha experience with friends, I like to drink cold tea rather then hot (well living in asia you prefer every drink as cold as possible to fend of the daily hot weather).


I am quite happy with my hagiyaki which is well over 2-3 pieces. And having just returned from Hagi I saw 100's of beautiful pieces I wish I could own. But that's personal taste. What I don't understand is "authentic matcha experience." No such thing. I read so often here ..."it is done this way, but you can do anything you want..." and I smile. The implied meaning is this is the only correct way, however if you do it some other way what do you really understand about Japan and tea drinking. Whatever way is your way is wonderful. There are only rules that one chooses to follow - they are not imposed. My being served matcha in a Living National Treasure chawan is as authentic as my feeble efforts in my home.
Enjoy your tea as you like...and please share so we can expand our views on the various styles and methods and pleasures of tea.
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The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Pig Hog » Sep 11th, '14, 17:54

I disagree. Perhaps 'traditional' is a better word here than 'authentic', but in terms of traditional matcha preparation and Japanese tea ceremony, there absolutely are right ways and wrong ways of doing it.

When drinking casually, of course there's no need to obey all these rules, apart from what you set yourself. Drink what you like, how you like because no one is judging you (except yourself).

It's less about what you understand about 'tea drinking' and more about what you understand about Japanese tea culture, and just because you choose not to follow tea ceremony rules doesn't necessarily mean that you don't 'understand' either!

But because you choose not to worry about this aspect (which is fine) doesn't mean that it doesn't exist at all.

I agree with the sentiment of your post -- drink how you please -- but tradition exists even so. Imagine preparing matcha in a cappuccino maker at tea ceremony...!
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby rdl » Sep 11th, '14, 19:38

[quote="Pig Hog" in terms of traditional matcha preparation and Japanese tea ceremony, there absolutely are right ways and wrong ways of doing it.[/quote]

If it were absolute then there would not be different schools following different rules. Even the great masters went their own direction to create new traditions. And when you mention "drinking casually," it's as if that is somehow below the level of a tea ceremony. Needless to say Japan is not filled with people rushing to tea ceremonies every day. It's a sub-culture that does not appeal to many. So while I agree there are old, rich, beautiful traditions, that in no way defines drinking tea. Maybe to a tea master an electric kettle was shocking at first. Now, except in very formal settings, they are ubiquitous, Get ready for cappuccino makers, everyone is breaking the rules. :lol:
And now - back to The unofficial/official HAGI topic. Sorry for the digression.
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The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Pig Hog » Sep 12th, '14, 03:50

I never said there is one 'absolute' way. I said 'there absolutely are[...]ways'. The fact that there are several 'correct' ways is indeed why different schools exist.

Eh? Drinking casually as opposed to drinking formally in the manner of chado. The fact that the majority of people drink 'casually' doesn't make that any less true. That's like saying that wearing jeans and a tshirt isn't casual because most people don't wear suits all the time...

I'm not disagreeing with how people choose to drink tea. You said that there is no such thing as authentic matcha. I'm saying that 'authentic' matcha is what is laid down by the rules of chado and Japanese tradition. Again, just because the majority of people don't study chado doesn't make these rules any less true, in the sense of tradition.

Granted, there may be varying degrees and definitions of 'authentic', if you want to be really picky -- is a matcha made outside of Japan still 'authentic'? Is 'casual' matcha served in a chawan and prepared with a chasen but without the formality of chado, still 'authentic'? (I would say no to the former and yes to the latter.) However, I am saying that authenticity and tradition still exists regardless of being followed by a minority.
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Tead Off » Sep 12th, '14, 07:05

enzomatcha wrote:Not a big fan of Hagi, but 2-3 three of them is quite enough to share an authentic matcha experience with friends, I like to drink cold tea rather then hot (well living in asia you prefer every drink as cold as possible to fend of the daily hot weather).

As someone who lives in Asia, I rarely drink cold liquids. This is a western habit, introduced through mass marketing efforts by the likes of Pepsi and Coca Cola. Even in the deserts of North Africa and the Middle East, hot tea is the preferred drink. This is said to cool the body.
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Fuut » Sep 13th, '14, 05:22

Tead Off wrote:
enzomatcha wrote:Not a big fan of Hagi, but 2-3 three of them is quite enough to share an authentic matcha experience with friends, I like to drink cold tea rather then hot (well living in asia you prefer every drink as cold as possible to fend of the daily hot weather).

As someone who lives in Asia, I rarely drink cold liquids. This is a western habit, introduced through mass marketing efforts by the likes of Pepsi and Coca Cola. Even in the deserts of North Africa and the Middle East, hot tea is the preferred drink. This is said to cool the body.


Seems like it could just as well apart from tradition be preference. Some time ago i read i think on the website of habiki-teas about cold matcha as well.
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Re: The unofficial/official HAGI topic!

Postby Tead Off » Sep 13th, '14, 08:39

Fuut wrote:
Tead Off wrote:
enzomatcha wrote:Not a big fan of Hagi, but 2-3 three of them is quite enough to share an authentic matcha experience with friends, I like to drink cold tea rather then hot (well living in asia you prefer every drink as cold as possible to fend of the daily hot weather).

As someone who lives in Asia, I rarely drink cold liquids. This is a western habit, introduced through mass marketing efforts by the likes of Pepsi and Coca Cola. Even in the deserts of North Africa and the Middle East, hot tea is the preferred drink. This is said to cool the body.


Seems like it could just as well apart from tradition be preference. Some time ago i read i think on the website of habiki-teas about cold matcha as well.

Don't you think there is more flavor and complexity in hot vs cold teas? Nothing wrong with cold tea, but it's not the same as hot tea to me.
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