The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic


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The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby Chip » Jan 2nd, '10, 23:17

I just received a great idea that I would like to take full credit for, but alas I must give credit where credit is due. :mrgreen:

AdamMY wrote: ... it seems [like a] good idea ... one thread under the Teaware Artisans forum titled "Ask the Artisans" Where people can ask the artists questions regarding pottery that they would like to know.

Just a thought.

And a great "thought" at that. Thank you Adam!!!

So, feel free to ask our artisans of TeawareArtisans questions pertaining to their craft that you would like directed to the group at large.

This topic is Stickied, so you will always find it right at the top of TeawareArtisans.
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby AdamMY » Jan 2nd, '10, 23:26

I've been smitten by Hagi yaki, and today I spent quite some time musing on the feel of the piece in hand. Now I understand for things like yunomi-s and wan-s that they should feel natural in hand. So my main question is as follows:

Do artists on some level acknowledge how pieces are usually held, and design them accordingly?

I ask because when musing on some of my pieces I realize that different pieces I hold different ways, but most feel completely natural when held. So are things like placement of thumb dimples, or ridges in the cup very thought out? Or could there be a secret that your hand or fingers will naturally feel there way to the spot they like the most?
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby bonjiri » Jan 2nd, '10, 23:44

AdamMY wrote:I've been smitten by Hagi yaki, and today I spent quite some time musing on the feel of the piece in hand. Now I understand for things like yunomi-s and wan-s that they should feel natural in hand. So my main question is as follows:

Do artists on some level acknowledge how pieces are usually held, and design them accordingly?

I ask because when musing on some of my pieces I realize that different pieces I hold different ways, but most feel completely natural when held. So are things like placement of thumb dimples, or ridges in the cup very thought out? Or could there be a secret that your hand or fingers will naturally feel there way to the spot they like the most?


adam
great question

on a personal note, i design each of my drinking vessels from guinomi, yunomi to matcha jawan with the full function of a drinking vessel. special attention on the balance/weight and 'feel' of the vessel in your hands.

the kuchizukuri or 'lip' area is also created to facilitate 'easy' liquid flow onto the palate. fat lips versus thin lips...

also color is paramount in choosing a matcha chawan. green on green versus other colors like black (tenmoku), white, celadon, etc. the most beautiful symbiosis with color is a hue that will contrast well with matcha green.

in guinomi, color is important. nihonshu is clear like water. a black guinomi would be less than desirable. white is great. i.e. shino, etc. there are many exceptions like black oilspot tenmoku.

some of my triangle shaped guinomi are specifically designed to be held and balanced with certain fingers much like a clarinet, in which certain fingers are placed like a 'fingering chart'.

matcha chawan are held after the shomen is rotated clockwise, in the same area during otemae (tea ceremony).

fun topic

aloha
happy new years !
cory
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby GreenwoodStudio » Jan 3rd, '10, 00:04

WOW, what a great thread to start. Thank you! It's refreshing when folks are interested in the potter's process.

Adam, absolutely. I would say for me, about half my intent in making is centered around a pieces tactile qualities, the other half is probably all about aesthetics. How will it be held? How will the firing, shape of the piece, placement in the kiln, and atmosphere throughout the wood firing effect it's final outcome? There are a lot of factors to consider when making, finishing and firing. I usually make several dozen of a form in hopes of getting a few that are acceptable or to my liking.
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Re: Pete Pinnel on the cup

Postby Littlepig2 » Jan 3rd, '10, 09:56

What a lovely start to this thread! I've been reading and thought this video would be a nice addition. It is "An interview with renowned ceramic artist Peter Pinnell produced in conjunction with the Cup: The Intimate Object V exhibition at the Charlie Cummings Gallery."

Here Pete talks about the aesthetics of the cup. It is not specific to tea but there is plenty of good material applicable. Also, Pete is talking to a western audience.

The video is 32 minutes long and for the first 10 minutes Pete talks about art as it relates to the cup. If you want to go directly to his cup talk that begins around 11 minutes into the video.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=302550256698394321#
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby Fredparkerpotte... » Jan 3rd, '10, 13:43

I have always believed that "functional" ware that is awkward or uncomfortable in the hand, to the lips or eyes is hardly functional at all. It might serve the basic need to contain something until it can be ingested, but then so can a $2 mug from WalMart or, for that matter, an unwashed empty tuna can.

To me the point of owning and using something an artisan has crafted is to be able to peer into that artisan's universe of experience, education, emotion and perhaps values and see a bit of him there, stuck onto something else that is rich and exciting in its own right -- like a really interesting tea. I hope my tea bowls reflect who I am and not simply a variation of shape and finish. I am fulfilled knowing there are some who enjoy using a tea bowl I made while enjoying something else of their own selection that is entirely different.

In my "perfect world" a tea bowl acknowledges the incredible journey the tea has taken to arrive to its drinker as well as the incredible journey of the tea drinker that led her to the combination of that specific tea and tea bowl. In my mind the tea bowl adds a kind of ceremonial vestment to the end event of serving and/or consuming tea, becoming one with the tea and its drinker. Hopefully, that vestment is complimentary but, as in life, sometimes it is not. I consider a tea bowl to be something of a "picture frame" for teas. It should be compatible, but sometimes is not. It should enhance and enrich, but sometimes it does not. However, it can do none of these things if it does not fit the hand, please the eye and meet the lips in a positive and pleasurable way.

Having said that I should also stress that the tea bowl is (in my mind) always secondary to the tea and also to its drinker. It is little more than a passive container -- not the star of the show in this trilogy of actors. My job as a potter is to make my tea bowls with all of these (and other) parameters in mind, and hope to end up with something that can join into a partnership with the tea to showcase it in its very best light.

Every tea bowl I make is an experiment governed by these considerations. I would guess the same is true for most potters.

Thanks for a great question! It's nice to know there is interest in these things outside the design community...

Fred Parker
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby JBaymore » Jan 3rd, '10, 21:05

Nice topic suggestion, Adam.

best,

..............john
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Re: Pete Pinnel on the cup

Postby bonjiri » Jan 3rd, '10, 21:21

Littlepig2 wrote:What a lovely start to this thread! I've been reading and thought this video would be a nice addition. It is "An interview with renowned ceramic artist Peter Pinnell produced in conjunction with the Cup: The Intimate Object V exhibition at the Charlie Cummings Gallery."

Here Pete talks about the aesthetics of the cup. It is not specific to tea but there is plenty of good material applicable. Also, Pete is talking to a western audience.

The video is 32 minutes long and for the first 10 minutes Pete talks about art as it relates to the cup. If you want to go directly to his cup talk that begins around 11 minutes into the video.

http://video.google.com/videoplay?docid=302550256698394321#


littlepig

thanks for sharing. wonderful talk by mr Pinnell.

wonderfuL!

wow !
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby ginkgo » Jan 5th, '10, 04:55

I agree too ...nice topic suggestion ! asking is good to can have a reflection on things : Some I make naturally , by the time, and it can push me to think why exactly. And it can be nice to have reflection also between craftmen to go on .
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby AdamMY » Jan 5th, '10, 13:36

Heres another question, this one possibly a bit more personal.

How did you get started with your art?

Short and sweet but I'm interested in hearing the answers.
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby Robert Fornell » Jan 5th, '10, 16:53

Adam,

Thanks for posing these wonderful questions...... I'd like to address at a later date however as we had a kitchen fire on New Years day making our house un-livable....... tough to contribute from the hotel lobby :(

Wishing all a happy and SAFE New Year.
R
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby AdamMY » Jan 5th, '10, 17:12

I'm sorry to hear that Ronin, I hope your house wasn't too badly damaged, and that you may return to your typical life style soon.
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby IPT » Jan 5th, '10, 23:02

I am very sorry to hear about your house. I hope everyone is ok.
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby Tead Off » Jan 6th, '10, 07:20

Robert,

Best Wishes to you.

Tead Off
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby JBaymore » Jan 6th, '10, 10:01

Robert,

WOW! Hope no one was injured. Sorry to hear this. Fire can work more than as a friend, ne'. Here's to a quick and inexpensive restoration.

best,

..............john
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