The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic


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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby FiveStar » Jul 3rd, '14, 01:59

Anyone have any recipes for glazes to share for raw glazing? I've got no access to an electric kiln for bisquing, so am limited a bit in that respect. I've got some simple shinos that are working nicely, but would love some more options. Nuka? I'd love good ash glaze recommendation too.
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby Petr Novák » Jul 3rd, '14, 06:34

FiveStar, I am not sure if it will help, but here are some thoughts on both questions you have had:

For Gaiwans: As usually with ceramic, there is no simple answer to that...here are some points to consider, here are some of them:

what kiln/firing we are talking about? It will be like heaven and hell if you are going to fire those pieces in fast fire kiln for 10-20hours(for example kind of phoenix kiln that we have) or in angama for 6days, with heavy ash deposites.

What clay do you use? I use, for my shibos 5-7 different clays+their mixtures. I prefer to have unglazed rim, so the lid can sit there during firing. But just one, maybe two caly are suitable for this combination: thin body, open shape, woodfiring. What happens with other clays, when the lid is not fired on pot, is that the lid, pot or both warp in fire. Sometime just a little bit but then it makes “unhappy” gaiwan user.

Unglazed gaiwan does not offend me either. In that case, for longer firing (more ash expected) I would use wadding kind of snake all around the lid. In case of glazed gaiwan. I would think twice where in the kiln to put it and hope for the best...Very often I say to this kind of questions: try and you will know for the next time, it is quite difficult to give any advices when I am not seeing your kiln, pots, not knowing clays, glazes, firing...

As for the raw glaze advices, generally, all more clay (high alumina) glazes are better for raw glazing. So start with slip glazes if you have any, you can even make some experiments to put regular glazes over those slip ones. Nuka can work, but just on some clays and will be quite tricky to glaze with, count with some losts during looking for the way how to glaze.

Happy day, happy fire
Petr
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby paul haigh » Jul 8th, '14, 08:56

I single fired for a few years after I built my wood kiln. The general rule is that most glazes will work with the addition of a couple percent bentonite (this should be added to the dry materials, mixed in the dry state, then add water to eliminate weird clumping effects like you see when adding flour/corn starch to a sauce).

I will add- I personally had more success glazing at the "black hard" stage than bone dry, for the same reason it's hard to rehydrate leather hard clay with most glazes.

I recall one particularly disheartening episode of a whole board full of mugs spontaneously disassembling after dunking them for shino tests.
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Re: The Official "Ask the Artisan" Community Topic

Postby FiveStar » Jul 8th, '14, 14:03

Thanks for the helpful replies Petr and Paul! I'm having good luck with simple neph sy/clay shinos at the moment, and am happy to hear about the bentonite. I've got one shino with soda ash that has 5% bentonite in it, so may try that on some test pieces.

Having a day job, and being a part time hobby potter certainly doesn't leave me with much time to get these experiments done! Firing in August, so hopefully I will find the time to make up a few test batches of glazes.

Thanks again!
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