How do you brew your Dragonwell?


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby Tead Off » Mar 10th, '11, 23:39

gingkoseto wrote:
David R. wrote:
Tead Off wrote:Some drinkers feel that thick walled gaiwans will cook the green tea leaves too much because they retain the heat longer. I'm not sure if it makes that much difference.


I am rather interested in people opinions about this. I have just bought a gorgeous medium-thick walled gaiwan - one to rule them all ! - and I am wondering if I'll need a eggshell one to have better results on green tea. I couldn't make some tests as I am waiting for the new crop to restock.

Thick wall won't cause tea to be over-cooked, if the gaiwan is not fully covered. Traditionally when gaiwan is used for green tea, the bowl is not fully covered by the lid until the tea starts to cool down. Even if people use gaiwan in a "gongfu" style (which is not used traditionally for green tea), with the adjusted water temperature or by leaving the lid off, the leaves won't be cooked.

I don't believe I can use a thin-walled gaiwan for more than 2 0times without breaking it :shock: Am I the only one? :oops: Usually before I could notice it, there is already hair line on it - and my thin-walled gaiwan aren't even those with the thinnest walls in market.


Your squeezing it too hard! :lol:
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby fire_snake » Mar 11th, '11, 10:17

My thoughts are preoccupied with the events in Japan. I have friends there and some of our TeaChat members are from there or have family there.

But as a diversion for a bit, I do have a couple of questions about Dragonwell brewing - to add to my original questions.

Now we're on the topic of tall glass brewing (vs. gaiwan?) . . .

Doesn't tall glass brewing run counter to sensible brewing? I've tried this method several times, and while it worked (I didn't really now any better since I was much more of a newb then) I wonder whether it was over brewed. After all, the key to tall glass brewing is (as far as I can tell), to allow the leaves to become turgid and fall to the bottom. This takes several minutes. And it's all one big infusion. I never really got too many more after the first one. Leaving green tea to brew for several minutes, however, is a bad idea, is it not? Yet it works in a tall glass?

I *assume* that this method would never work in a gaiwan because the water to leaf ratio is so close and brewing takes place in a smaller, much more compact space. Whereas in a tall glass, the glass is, well . . . tall. Much more water to counter bitterness and over brewing. Is this right?

Any thoughts on tall glass vs. gaiwan brewing and the differences between the quality of these brews?

Christian
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby Chasm » Mar 17th, '11, 22:35

David R. wrote:I am rather interested in people opinions about this. I have just bought a gorgeous medium-thick walled gaiwan - one to rule them all ! - and I am wondering if I'll need a eggshell one to have better results on green tea. I couldn't make some tests as I am waiting for the new crop to restock.


In my experience, infusion vessel and cup thickness have a substantial impact on the flavor and overall experience of a high-end green. I've been consistently finding thin is better, though not always eggshell thin. Shape of the cup can have startling effects as well.
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby gingkoseto » Mar 20th, '11, 12:53

Tead Off wrote:
Your squeezing it too hard! :lol:


Working too hard on gongfu :mrgreen:
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby gingkoseto » Mar 20th, '11, 13:00

fire_snake wrote:
Any thoughts on tall glass vs. gaiwan brewing and the differences between the quality of these brews?

Christian


When I use a glass and a gaiwan, I brew the tea the same "grandpa brewing" way. I think most Chinese green teas are ok for long infusions. But if the glass is too big, it can be a problem. Also I guess a lot of people probably find Chinese green tea too light-tasting and would like to use a lot of leaves. When a lot of tea leaves are used in a brewing, then the glass brewing may not be good. Probably that's why many people would prefer gongfu style with a gaiwan.
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby teafarm » Mar 21st, '11, 15:51

I was on a trip to Zhuhai in southern Guangdong area and this tea shop girl told me that I can brew the Dragonwell in cold water and leave it in the fridge overnight. Has anyone tried this and what were the results? Since I've never had a real kick-ass Dragonwell before, I wouldn't know what to expect. I always assume a good Dragonwell is something that I taste and my jaw would drop and my eye balls will pop out.
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby woozl » Mar 21st, '11, 19:43

For ice teas, and
most greens 9g/liter, pour good h20 (not heated) over night in the fridge
makes a tasty brew. One can add tiny amount of honey, not to sweeten, but as an antioxidant.We want to taste green :mrgreen:
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby teafarm » Mar 22nd, '11, 12:32

woozl wrote:For ice teas, and
most greens 9g/liter, pour good h20 (not heated) over night in the fridge
makes a tasty brew. One can add tiny amount of honey, not to sweeten, but as an antioxidant.We want to taste green :mrgreen:


Thank you Woozl. I'll try that with some Lychee Black that I recently bought online. It already sounds tasty!
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby tea-awed » Mar 22nd, '11, 13:56

teafarm wrote:I was on a trip to Zhuhai in southern Guangdong area and this tea shop girl told me that I can brew the Dragonwell in cold water and leave it in the fridge overnight. Has anyone tried this and what were the results? Since I've never had a real kick-ass Dragonwell before, I wouldn't know what to expect. I always assume a good Dragonwell is something that I taste and my jaw would drop and my eye balls will pop out.

As far as any "kick ass" teas causing my jaw to drop or my eyes to pop,it never happens. I think because of over expectation. I usually have to drink a tea a few times before I really begin to really appreciate it.
I usually use cheaper green teas than Dragonwell but during the Summer cold brewed greens are great!
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Re: How do you brew your Dragonwell?

Postby TIM » Mar 22nd, '11, 14:16

teafarm wrote:I was on a trip to Zhuhai in southern Guangdong area and this tea shop girl told me that I can brew the Dragonwell in cold water and leave it in the fridge overnight. Has anyone tried this and what were the results? Since I've never had a real kick-ass Dragonwell before, I wouldn't know what to expect. I always assume a good Dragonwell is something that I taste and my jaw would drop and my eye balls will pop out.


Tasted like pineapple, fresh pea, dash of yuzu, savory and oven fresh roasted peking duck skin. Usually my jaw will drop, but no effects on the eye balls. :lol:
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