Gyokuro aged?


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

Gyokuro aged?

Postby senchalover » Jun 28th, '11, 20:55

Just wondering what the general census is about aged gyokuro. All gyo is aged at least for 6months. Right. The longer the better?
User avatar
senchalover
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Feb 28th, '
Location: Connecticut USA

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby AdamMY » Jun 28th, '11, 21:37

Aged Gyokuro is Delicious. In theory all Gyokuro is aged for at least six months, but I get really confused when places advertise Shincha Gyokuro. I do not want to seem closed minded but I do not see how Shincha Gyokuro can be anything more than just a marketing ploy aimed at the non-Japanese. I say this because it fly's in the face of tradition, and I have a hard enough time liking Shincha, and I just feel like adding the overwhelming punch of Gyokuro Umami to that would create an utterly disgusting drink.

I want to age some of my own gyokuro but I can't stop myself from drinking any I have in the house.
User avatar
AdamMY
 
Posts: 2361
Joined: Jul 22nd, '
Location: Capital of the Mitten

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby Chasm » Jun 28th, '11, 22:25

AdamMY wrote:I want to age some of my own gyokuro but I can't stop myself from drinking any I have in the house.

:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

How would one go about aging gyokuro? I've got some stuffed in the fridge -- does that count?
Chasm
 
Posts: 217
Joined: Mar 16th, '

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby AdamMY » Jun 28th, '11, 22:52

Chasm wrote:
AdamMY wrote:I want to age some of my own gyokuro but I can't stop myself from drinking any I have in the house.

:mrgreen: :mrgreen: :mrgreen:

How would one go about aging gyokuro? I've got some stuffed in the fridge -- does that count?


Mostly keep it in its original bag, and do not open the bag for an extended length of time. I would like to run Gyokuro aging experiments but I do not have the budget right now. As it is still a green tea, I would be wary of aging it more than 2 or 3 years, and even that might be pushing it. Although I have not read any accounts of people carrying out experiments to search for the optimal length of time.
User avatar
AdamMY
 
Posts: 2361
Joined: Jul 22nd, '
Location: Capital of the Mitten

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby tortoise » Jun 28th, '11, 23:00

I have not aged gyo yet. Nor have I tasted significantly aged gyo, but I'd like to. I am setting some aside. It sounds great to me. I'm not sure how long the potential age curve could go, but I want to shoot for two years in my possession. Mine is still sealed, but I wonder if exposing it to oxygen once at a certain point -- then resealing-- would help it along? Keepin' it 'fridgerated would slow down the aging process I'm told.
User avatar
tortoise
 
Posts: 705
Joined: Sep 1st, '1
Location: Northwest Louisiana

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby olivierco » Jun 29th, '11, 02:38

User avatar
olivierco
 
Posts: 3375
Joined: Feb 8th, '0
Location: France

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby senchalover » Jun 29th, '11, 06:17

So, in a a way it is like pu-erh. The longer is ferments the better it tastes? Interesting concept. There is just too much to learn about tea.

So, I should give gyokuro another chance. It is a very finnicky tea.
User avatar
senchalover
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Feb 28th, '
Location: Connecticut USA

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby tortoise » Jun 29th, '11, 09:24

senchalover wrote:
So, I should give gyokuro another chance. It is a very finnicky tea.


The more I brew sencha and gyokuro, the less I find gyokuro to be finicky. In fact, I'm finding it more difficult to stay consistent with sencha through 4-5 steeps than gyokuro. Compared to sencha, Gyokuro is remarkably predictable.
User avatar
tortoise
 
Posts: 705
Joined: Sep 1st, '1
Location: Northwest Louisiana

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby senchalover » Jun 29th, '11, 09:50

Practice grasshopper. :) Thats what I need. Its true. Anything becomes easy with practice.
User avatar
senchalover
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Feb 28th, '
Location: Connecticut USA

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby Tead Off » Jun 29th, '11, 12:41

senchalover wrote:So, in a a way it is like pu-erh. The longer is ferments the better it tastes? Interesting concept. There is just too much to learn about tea.

So, I should give gyokuro another chance. It is a very finnicky tea.

Fermentation is a process of introducing bacteria through the medium of heat and moisture in order to produce an effect on tea. Aging gyokuro does not involve fermenting the tea. It is just stored in its dried state in an environment that will not deteriorate it. Nothing like Puerh.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3439
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby senchalover » Jun 29th, '11, 14:14

So, aging will not affect the flavor? Then, what is the point.
User avatar
senchalover
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Feb 28th, '
Location: Connecticut USA

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby Chip » Jun 29th, '11, 16:37

senchalover wrote:So, aging will not affect the flavor? Then, what is the point.

The flavor mellows ... sweetens.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22135
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby senchalover » Jun 29th, '11, 17:53

Sounds good. I don't have much experience with gyokuro.
User avatar
senchalover
 
Posts: 75
Joined: Feb 28th, '
Location: Connecticut USA

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby AdamMY » Jun 29th, '11, 21:50

Yeah Gyo ages differently than Puerh, if you see rusty reddish brown gyokuro leaves, run, run away, very fast. :arrow: :!: :!:
User avatar
AdamMY
 
Posts: 2361
Joined: Jul 22nd, '
Location: Capital of the Mitten

Re: Gyokuro aged?

Postby Tead Off » Jun 29th, '11, 22:42

senchalover wrote:So, aging will not affect the flavor? Then, what is the point.

I didn't say that. I was pointing out the difference between aging and fermenting. Both will affect flavor, but differently. Puerh is one of the few teas that undergoes a fermentation process. After the fermentation process, it is aged. But, many teas are aged without fermenting them. Some can withstand aging, some do not. The article Olivierco linked to explains how gyokuro is treated when it is aged. Excellent article.
User avatar
Tead Off
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 3439
Joined: Apr 1st, '0
Location: Bangkok

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation