Longjin


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

Longjin

Postby m147 » Sep 15th, '11, 13:39

when i brew longjin in a tall glass, according to the specifications, it never sinks to the bottom of the glass. what could be the problem?
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Re: Longjin

Postby Chip » Sep 15th, '11, 20:55

m147 wrote:when i brew longjin in a tall glass, according to the specifications, it never sinks to the bottom of the glass. what could be the problem?

I decided to try this with a new Xi Hu LJ from a friend. Tall glass. I used 3 grams per 4 ounces (120 ml) water. No preheating, 170*, fell asleep at the switch and brewed for almost 3 minutes.

This tea is very dry and crispy (and of course flat), and therefore it really wanted to float and avoid absorbing water. Very few leaves sank during the first 2 steeps.

A few steeps in, I felt the tea was better, deeper flavored and the leaves had finally absorbed water ... was thus sinking readily with each new pour of hot water. The 3rd, 4th and 5th steeps were the best (just enjoying the 5th now)

Conversely, IMHO a lesser LJ that has gone through more roasting to give it simulated flavor (toasty, nutty), the first steep is usually best, 2nd is good, 3rd is fading fast as the toastiness has given way to less than impressive actual leaf flavor.

I have drawn a few tentative conclusions from this ...
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Re: Longjing

Postby beachape » Sep 15th, '11, 22:24

When I drink Longjing, I usually drink it out of a glass gaiwan with a lid. Make sure you put the tea in the bottom and then add the water over the tea. Even so, the tea leaves will usually float to the top until they have absorbed enough water to sink. That is why the lid of the gaiwan is helpful. You can use the lid to deflect the leaves while you are taking a sip.

Another tip you can use is to put the leaves in the bottom of the cup. Pour a smaller amount of water (maybe 1/4) into the cup let it sit for a few seconds, maybe swirl it around and then add the rest of the water.
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Re: Longjing

Postby m147 » Sep 16th, '11, 04:48

beachape wrote:Another tip you can use is to put the leaves in the bottom of the cup. Pour a smaller amount of water (maybe 1/4) into the cup let it sit for a few seconds, maybe swirl it around and then add the rest of the water.


i had done this, as per a youtube video, swirled it around for a minute or so, but still no sinking. i forget subsequent steeps, but i think the results were similar.
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Re: Longjin

Postby bagua7 » Sep 18th, '11, 21:18

I am more partial to brewing on a thin-walled gaiwan where the degree of pour, including height and flow, and temperature (a high distance and a thinner pour will lower water temperature, if too hot) can be controlled. This rules applies to all Chinese greens due to their affinity to wood energy (vigor and youth, growth and development).

Good luck with the brewing.
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