Kuding tea


Healthy herbs, rooibos, honeybush, decaf tea, and yerba mate.

Re: Kuding tea

Postby kaminix » Jan 15th, '11, 10:10

Marco wrote:Keep in mind that we all consist about 2/3 of water. :)

And the herbal medicine has a tradition of thousands of years - not only in Asia but all over the world and in every culture.
And homeopathy works with concentrations far below 1%.

The saponins seem to have very positive health effects - but I do not know much more.

The argument of homeopathy is not very convincing. :p

I don't mind herbal medicine as long as there's proof, in fact I believe most modern medicine is based on herbal medicines which have been known to work and then synthesised. For example I have no problems accepting that oranges could cure (the extremely rare condition) vitamin C deficiency. :-)
User avatar
kaminix
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Aug 1st, '1
Location: Sweden

Re: Kuding tea

Postby Chip » Jan 15th, '11, 10:48

Heh, sounds interesting ... just throw a leaf or two in and go ...

If the opp ever arises to try it, I would. :mrgreen:
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22178
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Re: Kuding tea

Postby Marco » Jan 15th, '11, 11:10

kaminix wrote:
Marco wrote:Keep in mind that we all consist about 2/3 of water. :)

And the herbal medicine has a tradition of thousands of years - not only in Asia but all over the world and in every culture.
And homeopathy works with concentrations far below 1%.

The saponins seem to have very positive health effects - but I do not know much more.

The argument of homeopathy is not very convincing. :p

I don't mind herbal medicine as long as there's proof, in fact I believe most modern medicine is based on herbal medicines which have been known to work and then synthesised. For example I have no problems accepting that oranges could cure (the extremely rare condition) vitamin C deficiency. :-)


Oh some strict believer in science. :)
I am an engineer and I am a very sceptic person. I learned to believe nothing what I did not verify first.
But nowadays I believe that there is more than we can imagine of.
And science is not able yet to do the prove.

But fact is that saponins and their effects are not investigated enough.

Chip wrote:Heh, sounds interesting ... just throw a leaf or two in and go ...

If the opp ever arises to try it, I would. :mrgreen:

I've got some nails left - I think I will try a second time but maybe no third :D
It is called "bitter nail" - and it really honours this name :D
User avatar
Marco
 
Posts: 328
Joined: Jun 11th, '
Location: Austria

Re: Kuding tea

Postby kaminix » Jan 15th, '11, 12:04

Marco wrote:
kaminix wrote:
Marco wrote:Keep in mind that we all consist about 2/3 of water. :)

And the herbal medicine has a tradition of thousands of years - not only in Asia but all over the world and in every culture.
And homeopathy works with concentrations far below 1%.

The saponins seem to have very positive health effects - but I do not know much more.

The argument of homeopathy is not very convincing. :p

I don't mind herbal medicine as long as there's proof, in fact I believe most modern medicine is based on herbal medicines which have been known to work and then synthesised. For example I have no problems accepting that oranges could cure (the extremely rare condition) vitamin C deficiency. :-)


Oh some strict believer in science. :)
I am an engineer and I am a very sceptic person. I learned to believe nothing what I did not verify first.
But nowadays I believe that there is more than we can imagine of.
And science is not able yet to do the prove.

But fact is that saponins and their effects are not investigated enough.

Chip wrote:Heh, sounds interesting ... just throw a leaf or two in and go ...

If the opp ever arises to try it, I would. :mrgreen:

I've got some nails left - I think I will try a second time but maybe no third :D
It is called "bitter nail" - and it really honours this name :D

Well, I'm not as bad as some are, but I do want some sort of evidence pointing to it being effective before I go out and buy a tea I KNOW is going to be nasty. Also it's a little on the expensive side if I remember correctly, no? :p
User avatar
kaminix
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Aug 1st, '1
Location: Sweden

Re: Kuding tea

Postby AdamMY » Jan 15th, '11, 13:42

kaminix wrote:Well, I'm not as bad as some are, but I do want some sort of evidence pointing to it being effective before I go out and buy a tea I KNOW is going to be nasty. Also it's a little on the expensive side if I remember correctly, no? :p


I've had some Kuding before, and while I can not speak directly to its health effects mine was bitter but I did not find it that bad. But what I will say is it did work wonders on a bad headache I had one day, but I can only speculate as to why it worked.
User avatar
AdamMY
 
Posts: 2363
Joined: Jul 22nd, '
Location: Capital of the Mitten

Re: Kuding tea

Postby eugene_b » Jan 16th, '11, 10:14

If we don't know the mechanism by which it works, it doesn't mean it doesn't work :) There are many even human-made medicines that have written on them "mechanism is not fully understood".

So if a certain herb is well-known in herbal medicine and has been used to cure something, why not give it a try? As far as I know herbs are much less toxic for the body than human-made stuff so IMHO it makes sense to experiment with these things and use them against minor sicknesses instead of pills.

Personally I didn't have a chance to try Kuding, I haven't had any kind of illness for ... I don't remember already, 5 years may be. But I am going to order this herb soon and will use relatives and friends as test subjects :D
User avatar
eugene_b
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Dec 25th, '

Re: Kuding tea

Postby kaminix » Jan 17th, '11, 06:41

eugene_b wrote:If we don't know the mechanism by which it works, it doesn't mean it doesn't work :) There are many even human-made medicines that have written on them "mechanism is not fully understood".

So if a certain herb is well-known in herbal medicine and has been used to cure something, why not give it a try? As far as I know herbs are much less toxic for the body than human-made stuff so IMHO it makes sense to experiment with these things and use them against minor sicknesses instead of pills.

Personally I didn't have a chance to try Kuding, I haven't had any kind of illness for ... I don't remember already, 5 years may be. But I am going to order this herb soon and will use relatives and friends as test subjects :D

Hm, but without tests comparing people who've used it to people who have not (double blinds I believe they're called?) it's hard to tell if they work at all. :-) Though I agree with mechanisms not really being needed, I guess I din't think it thorugh properly. :-)

Why would a plant be any less toxic than a man-made compound?
User avatar
kaminix
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Aug 1st, '1
Location: Sweden

Re: Kuding tea

Postby eugene_b » Jan 17th, '11, 08:01

Hm, but without tests comparing people who've used it to people who have not (double blinds I believe they're called?) it's hard to tell if they work at all. :-) Though I agree with mechanisms not really being needed, I guess I din't think it thorugh properly.

Well, I guess in order to run a real test one needs to have lots of test subjects and lots of enthusiasm :) I can't really see this happening, I doubt anyone here has so many friends and relatives that there can be found a moment in time when several hundred of them are ill (and will agree to drink some weird herb). So unless some clinic, university, etc picks up Kuding for tests, we'll have to stick with a light edition of this experiment: just give it to a person who, for example, is being seized by heavy coughing and see if any effect can be observed.

Why would a plant be any less toxic than a man-made compound?

I am not sure why and that probably is not related to all man-made medicines but I've heard many stories and saw some examples when a medicine cures something and at the same time destroys some other system. Actually now that I think of it, it might be an illusion caused by the fact that I compare tiny illnesses cured by herbs to serious stuff cured by heavy medicines. Anyways, I have more trust in nature-made stuff so for caughing or cold I would go with herbs ))
User avatar
eugene_b
 
Posts: 45
Joined: Dec 25th, '

Re: Kuding tea

Postby Marco » Jan 18th, '11, 16:17

eugene_b wrote: As far as I know herbs are much less toxic for the body than human-made stuff so IMHO it makes sense to experiment with these things and use them against minor sicknesses instead of pills.

I am going with kaminix on this one.
It really is a very widespread erroneous belief in humans that artificial is bad or dangerous and natural is great and safe.
The best poisons in the world are natural.


And back to topic - you should try Kuding for the experience of it. But for a delight - I never would. And for healthiness? A lot of things are healthy and do taste great - so why should you? :)
BTW I tried some Bitter Grass herbal tea once - I never would have thought that there is something this bitter in the world. It is extreme.
User avatar
Marco
 
Posts: 328
Joined: Jun 11th, '
Location: Austria

Re: Kuding tea

Postby bearsbearsbears » Jan 20th, '11, 16:42

For the scientifically minded, the Google Scholar search results for kuding: http://scholar.google.com/scholar?hl=en&as_sdt=1,5&q=kuding

Someone mentioned homeopathy. Tea is not homeopathic; even a weak brew is much more concentrated--by tens and hundreds--than typical homeopathic dilutions.
User avatar
bearsbearsbears
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Jun 15th, '
Location: Lawrenceville, GA

Re: Kuding tea

Postby SlientSipper » Jan 25th, '11, 01:21

good find up there.
For me I did notice a noticeable improvement in my asthma.
I drank it as a regiment. It is a an acquired taste though I must say that.
Chances are, you are going to HATEdrinking this a hundred times before you enjoy sipping it once. :mrgreen:
User avatar
SlientSipper
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Nov 21st, '

Re: Kuding tea

Postby bearsbearsbears » Jan 25th, '11, 02:07

SlientSipper wrote:Chances are, you are going to HATEdrinking this a hundred times before you enjoy sipping it once. :mrgreen:


It only took me a dozen cups or so before I took a liking to it.
User avatar
bearsbearsbears
 
Posts: 461
Joined: Jun 15th, '
Location: Lawrenceville, GA

Re: Kuding tea

Postby IPT » Jan 25th, '11, 03:52

I like Kuding Tea very much. It's powefully bitter, but once you get used to that, it's quite nice.
User avatar
IPT
Vendor Member
 
Posts: 1556
Joined: Nov 13th, '
Location: Guilin, Guangxi China

Re: Kuding tea

Postby SlientSipper » Jan 26th, '11, 01:49

bearsbearsbears wrote:
SlientSipper wrote:Chances are, you are going to HATEdrinking this a hundred times before you enjoy sipping it once. :mrgreen:


It only took me a dozen cups or so before I took a liking to it.


Ah then please pardon my hyperbole. :wink:
User avatar
SlientSipper
 
Posts: 325
Joined: Nov 21st, '

Re: Kuding tea

Postby Se7en8ight » Aug 6th, '14, 11:02

Hello All,

Just sharing.

Yet another kind of tea that I got as a gift. My mom just went "this is really good tea!" I thought it was TGY cause it also came in a small gold vacuum sealed pack, without looking I emptied half a sachet into the a Gaiwan and poured boiling water on it, then covered. When I opened the Gaiwan I was like :shock: this is some of the most beautiful tea leaves i've seen.... oh but then... I proceeded to take a mouthful. I was not prepared for what was about to happen, I almost lost consciousness!!! :lol: it was so bitter, insanely so.

I asked her what the heck it was... she goes "I don't know, your auntie said it's good tea" :roll:

10 yrs down the road, I discover it's kuding.

78
User avatar
Se7en8ight
 
Posts: 51
Joined: Jul 17th, '
Location: the Philippines

PreviousNext

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation