Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh


"Official Tea Tasting Initiative" Teas shared & discussed.

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby Seeker » Feb 13th, '11, 03:22

Hi Marsha,
What you share is well said. Thank you.
Yes - the Teance offerings (with the exception of the 15 yr which is actually 19 yr, but Winnie doesn't change the name as it was only properly aged for 15) are all shou and not very exceptional for that style, but really decent IMO.
This is because (as I'm told) of the difficulty of acquiring quality aged puerh in sufficient quantities for selling reliably enough, and the shou is easier to come by and in more demand as a 'drinkable now' tea.
I do like the 15 yr sheng, and i rate it among some of the better pu's I've had.
I must say I find it weird sometimes to read folks writing the praises of young sheng when it is so harsh, and bitter and generally unpleasant...and because I so dislike it.
But some do seem to really genuinely like it and even love it and I have total respect for them.
Oh...just remembered, Teance does have one shou that is the best I've tasted, the puerh A. I also fancy the cube. Both pretty yummy for shou.
Wish I had a reliable source for well aged really good sheng.
Perhaps one day.
Cheers!
:D
Ps- just an afterthought... I don't know what Teance offers online and haven't checked as I go directly into their brick and mortar tea bar. So my apologies if the teas I mentioned are not available online.
User avatar
Seeker
 
Posts: 1727
Joined: May 22nd, '
Location: Northern California

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby kaminix » Feb 13th, '11, 03:48

Tried #1 yesterday, will probably have #2 and possibly #3 sometime next week.

Liked it very much. My points of reference are a few (3 or 4-ish) young sheengs and about the same number (though larger ammounts) of shu.

My first impression is that it is somewhere inbetween, it has the strong earthy flavour that a shu has (though not as pronounced) but retains some of the sheeng's more delicate qualities as well.

The smell was very nice too. I usually liken the smell of shu to something like a stable of a farm, with that as a reference this was more like a barn (i.e. the smell of dry hay).

I also noticed a very sweet aftertaste, especially prevalent in the first steep, which was much to my liking. The second infusion we might've overdone a little as it was slightly bitter and much more astringent than the first. Third was by far the best steep, bringing out the good from the first and second with none or very little of the bitterness or astringency.



By the way... a lot of my friend's have independently drawn the same conclusion about the smell of shu, that it smells like a stable or a farm, yet most tea drinkers I hear simply refer to both taste and smell as earthy and nutty which in my opinion is much less descriptive. Any takers on why swedes seem much more likely to draw the comparison? :D
User avatar
kaminix
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Aug 1st, '1
Location: Sweden

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby entropyembrace » Feb 13th, '11, 03:55

MarshalN wrote:Seeker:

Well, I'm not old enough to have tried 30 (or more) years old tea when they were young, but I know plenty of people who have, and everyone of them told me that when these teas were young they were 1) harsh and 2) undrinkable. They were, basically, nasty. Sourness, smoke, bitterness... all kinds of unpleasant tastes were in them. .


sounds yummy to me :mrgreen:

Actually one of the things Im really interesting in trying from this OTTI is the 8582 since I´m familiar with recent productions of this recipe...which I enjoy....I really want to see how an aged example of the recipe tastes...that´ll be as close as I can get to drinking the same tea aged and young for a while...

now if only the package would arrive....damn Canada post is slooooooooooooooooooooooooooow :evil:
User avatar
entropyembrace
 
Posts: 1911
Joined: Mar 3rd, '0

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby entropyembrace » Feb 13th, '11, 03:57

kaminix wrote:By the way... a lot of my friend's have independently drawn the same conclusion about the smell of shu, that it smells like a stable or a farm, yet most tea drinkers I hear simply refer to both taste and smell as earthy and nutty which in my opinion is much less descriptive. Any takers on why swedes seem much more likely to draw the comparison? :D


Americans dont want to admit their overpriced, low quality shu smells like manure :roll: :lol:
User avatar
entropyembrace
 
Posts: 1911
Joined: Mar 3rd, '0

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby kaminix » Feb 13th, '11, 05:34

entropyembrace wrote:
kaminix wrote:By the way... a lot of my friend's have independently drawn the same conclusion about the smell of shu, that it smells like a stable or a farm, yet most tea drinkers I hear simply refer to both taste and smell as earthy and nutty which in my opinion is much less descriptive. Any takers on why swedes seem much more likely to draw the comparison? :D


Americans dont want to admit their overpriced, low quality shu smells like manure :roll: :lol:

Haha, possibly. :D Though I don't really mean it as a bad thing, the Golden Needle & White Lotus I have is one of my favourites despite it too having sort of a stable-like smell (though admittedly not as pronounced as other shu I've had). :p
User avatar
kaminix
 
Posts: 32
Joined: Aug 1st, '1
Location: Sweden

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby David R. » Feb 13th, '11, 09:07

Very interesting discussion above. Thank you all.

Today, I am finishing the sample #2 I have begun yesterday. I prefer it to #1 so far. I haven't read the "key" so I don't know what I am drinking. This is really interesting. I used half of the samples in a 10cl gaiwan. I look forward to trying them in my teapot.

To be continued...
Attachments
IMG_7101a.JPG
This is sample #1.
IMG_7101a.JPG (123.57 KiB) Viewed 521 times
User avatar
David R.
 
Posts: 1112
Joined: Oct 6th, '0
Location: France

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby tortoise » Feb 13th, '11, 10:51

entropyembrace wrote:
kaminix wrote:By the way... a lot of my friend's have independently drawn the same conclusion about the smell of shu, that it smells like a stable or a farm, yet most tea drinkers I hear simply refer to both taste and smell as earthy and nutty which in my opinion is much less descriptive. Any takers on why swedes seem much more likely to draw the comparison? :D


Americans dont want to admit their overpriced, low quality shu smells like manure :roll: :lol:


I think that may be an accurate reason. People tend to avoid adjectives or analogies that aren't already in the flavor category. I think describing pu as similar to a barn stall is very accurate. And I think I'm finding that as sentimental as I am for farm smells, I prefer them on a farm to in a tea cup.
User avatar
tortoise
 
Posts: 705
Joined: Sep 1st, '1
Location: Northwest Louisiana

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby Drax » Feb 13th, '11, 13:21

Hrm, interesting. We must have completely different experiences in barn stalls, because to me, barn stalls smell like shit. Pu'erh does not smell like shit to me.

To me, pu'erh (at least shu) usually smells like compost, which is a completely different aroma. But I find that description more "accurate." At worst the flavors can ride closer to sweaty gym socks.

Of course, this discussion is further interesting to me, given that none of these samples are shu, and I am getting neither shit nor compost aromas and flavors out of samples #1 and #2. I am getting mostly a sandalwood quality, or general woodiness. Perhaps I have that to look forward to in sample #3?
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2559
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby rabbit » Feb 13th, '11, 13:32

I would tend to think that we find the aroma/flavor connections with what we are familier with, some will say the forest, some will say a barn.

I grew up with horses, and a clean horse barn can smell like dust, old wood and sweet hay... notes that I've found in all of the older pu's I've drank.

I feel some people are scared to use such comparisons because who would admit to enjoying a musty old log or sun scorched soil? :lol:
User avatar
rabbit
 
Posts: 713
Joined: Feb 14th, '
Location: A briar patch.

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby Drax » Feb 13th, '11, 13:39

rabbit wrote:a clean horse barn can smell like dust, old wood and sweet hay...


(Emphasis mine.) This statement I can agree with! But those qualities were not the focus of other comments.

Certain young shengs often remind me of a haystack, too...
User avatar
Drax
 
Posts: 2559
Joined: Oct 16th, '
Location: Arlington, VA

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby Marco » Feb 13th, '11, 13:44

Seeker wrote:Still curious also about a thorough definition of 'cha qi'?
:)

Found this here on teachat:
cha qi
And I have to say a brilliant description. Westerners tend to think qi is the same thing as energy - and it is definitely not the whole truth.

meatyard wrote:I am very new to Pu-erh and am unsure how well I am attempting this review or how well I am describing what I am tasting.

liked the description :) - good review

So up to me - on Friday I got a letter from the postman :) - and so this is Pu-OTTI-weekend.
I started with the #2.
Took about 4g in a 60ml Gaiwan. All the tiny bits of the sample went in this session though.
Dry leaves have this "old" smell just as old books you took from the attic.
Wet leaves have a dump smell that I dislike. This disappeared very late in the session.
Kept water near boiling throughout the session and gave it a flash rinse.
Then brewed for 5", 10", 10", 20", 20", 30", 1', 1'. Took a break here and later came back for another 10 infusions. This seemed to be enough. :)

It started surprisingly mellow, sweat and pleasant. I had not expected that after the smell. In the 3rd and 4th infusion there came something that made me think "wow".
All in all - very nice and I have to say I liked it. In the second round with this tea I will fully enjoy.

Thanks a lot to Mrs. and Mr. Chip making the OTTIs possible and thanks to our generous donators Brandon and Nada.
Attachments
#2.jpg
First 6 steepings clockwise from top. Nice looks.
#2.jpg (160.71 KiB) Viewed 483 times
User avatar
Marco
 
Posts: 328
Joined: Jun 11th, '
Location: Austria

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby AdamMY » Feb 13th, '11, 13:47

entropyembrace wrote:
kaminix wrote:By the way... a lot of my friend's have independently drawn the same conclusion about the smell of shu, that it smells like a stable or a farm, yet most tea drinkers I hear simply refer to both taste and smell as earthy and nutty which in my opinion is much less descriptive. Any takers on why swedes seem much more likely to draw the comparison? :D


Americans dont want to admit their overpriced, low quality shu smells like manure :roll: :lol:


Actually I find it smells and tastes a bit like manure which is why I hardly drink it and any of the low quality stuff I brew very weak.
User avatar
AdamMY
 
Posts: 2362
Joined: Jul 22nd, '
Location: Capital of the Mitten

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby Marco » Feb 13th, '11, 14:01

I had #3 yesterday evening.

About half the sample in my 60ml Gaiwan - but tried not to fill water to the rim, 'cause the sample is smaller.
The dry leaves smell a little spicy, I think. I like that.
Wet leaves had not much of a smell - but the cup smelled great after the session.
Again kept water near boiling throughout the session and gave it a flash rinse.
Then brewed for 5", 10", 10", 20", 20", 30", 30", 50", 1'. Took a break, 'cause it was time for bed. And in the morning I had another 5 infusions out of this one.

The first ones have been very light and sweet.
In the third and fourth I noticed some "Medicine"-taste in the finish. Not unpleasant though. What could this have been?
As you seen in the picture the colour of the brews is much lighter. This one is definitely dry stored.
I liked it too. It is the oldest one and tastes like it were the youngest.
Attachments
#3.jpg
First 6 infusions clockwise from top left.
#3.jpg (157.73 KiB) Viewed 483 times
User avatar
Marco
 
Posts: 328
Joined: Jun 11th, '
Location: Austria

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby Seeker » Feb 13th, '11, 15:00

Thank you for that cha qi link Marco! Great.
And loved the subsequent link to a puerh glossary (tho I haven't taken a thorough look at the glossary yet).
Great comments everyone.
Awesome discussion.
Cheers.
:D
User avatar
Seeker
 
Posts: 1727
Joined: May 22nd, '
Location: Northern California

Re: Pu-OTTI 9, 90's Sheng Pu-erh

Postby MarshalN » Feb 13th, '11, 21:17

Seeker wrote:Hi Marsha,
What you share is well said. Thank you.
Yes - the Teance offerings (with the exception of the 15 yr which is actually 19 yr, but Winnie doesn't change the name as it was only properly aged for 15) are all shou and not very exceptional for that style, but really decent IMO.
This is because (as I'm told) of the difficulty of acquiring quality aged puerh in sufficient quantities for selling reliably enough, and the shou is easier to come by and in more demand as a 'drinkable now' tea.
I do like the 15 yr sheng, and i rate it among some of the better pu's I've had.
I must say I find it weird sometimes to read folks writing the praises of young sheng when it is so harsh, and bitter and generally unpleasant...and because I so dislike it.
But some do seem to really genuinely like it and even love it and I have total respect for them.
Oh...just remembered, Teance does have one shou that is the best I've tasted, the puerh A. I also fancy the cube. Both pretty yummy for shou.
Wish I had a reliable source for well aged really good sheng.
Perhaps one day.
Cheers!
:D
Ps- just an afterthought... I don't know what Teance offers online and haven't checked as I go directly into their brick and mortar tea bar. So my apologies if the teas I mentioned are not available online.


Seeker:

I think there are plenty of sources for that type of thing that can be both pleasant and older. Of course, your idea of pleasantness may differ, and may require someone else spending some time to run through the range of possibilities (of which there's an endless variation) so that you can find that optimal point of drinkability and cost/ease of access.
User avatar
MarshalN
 
Posts: 2105
Joined: Mar 15th, '

PreviousNext

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation