White tea newbie, maybe, asks


White and yellow teas are among the most subtle.

White tea newbie, maybe, asks

Postby peachaddict » May 14th, '06, 19:13

Just thought of this. I've been wondering this and I decided to ask. Before I spend my dinner money on white tea, I want to know more about it. You guys have said that it's a very subtle tea. Is it also a vegetal tasting tea? That's the only thing about green teas that gets me now and then, that grassy taste. I know tea's pretty hard to describe the taste of, but any tries will be helpful. Thanks.
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Postby TeaFanatic » May 14th, '06, 19:30

Most white teas are not typically very vegetal tasting, but they are extremely mild and difficult to differentiate unless you have a well trained palette. If you plan on trying white tea for the first time, I would recommend that you throw in a sampler with another order, that way if you don't like it then you won't have wasted to much money.

I would recommend that you try silver needles as that is probably the best white that you can get.
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Postby MarshalN » May 14th, '06, 21:18

White tea is usually less grassy than green. In fact, it's milder, most of the time.

I actually would go the other way, and start out with a crappier white -- you really can't tell the big difference, and might as well save a few bucks.
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Postby TeaFanatic » May 14th, '06, 21:47

Yea you are right MarshallN, you should probably aim for a lower end white. One of my favorite cheaper type of white tea, is snow bud. In my opinion, it is a delicious white, and for $2 for a sample, not that bad price-wise.
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Postby Chip » May 14th, '06, 22:44

Peach, a lot of people think all white tea is the same...on the contrary, they are quite diverse in flavor, aroma, and definately price. I have a decent variety and while about 50% of them are so simular that unless you did a side by side taste comparison, most tea fans would have a hard time discerning the difference.

The other 50% though are quite varied in taste, aroma, and leaf appearence.

I would not describe any of them as grassy though, or astringent for that matter...but most do have a mellow flavor...yet some have a kinda spicey aroma and taste...like I said pretty diverse...

The most common you will find and more affordable than any is mutan white or pai mu tan (spelled many ways). Those are usually pretty decent too...

Good luck.
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Postby peachaddict » May 15th, '06, 01:14

Thanks, guys. I think I'll kinda have to go for the cheaper anyway due to my budget, and from what you guys say, I don't feel quite so much like I'm going to be cheated right away because of it. I'm very relieved to hear that it isn't vegetal tasting :D . I think I'll go for it after this week (for finals, food is a necessity). I'll post here again when I get some and try some.
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Postby studio271 » May 15th, '06, 11:03

For a while, my favorite tea had been some (bagged) orange blossom white tea from RofT, and I only stopped drinking it when I used the last bag. :-P

Point is, I tried some Silver Needle from Rishi Tea about a month ago, and found it to be the absolute most disgusting tea I've ever had, thus helping enforce to me the idea that everything is relative. What I didn't like about it was that it was almost chemical-tasting, and that was when I brewed it at just 170 degrees for only 30 seconds. I just happen to really like my white tea flavored, I guess.

Hear ya on finals fooding, too, heh. If I have to think too hard about food or drink during finals, I'll lose my sanity, so I always kill the budget during finals week and splurge on whatever I need to keep me happy. GOOD LUCK!
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Postby Mocha Wheels » Aug 31st, '07, 10:11

in my opinion i think white tea is great for not only a person who wants a light flavor, but also a person with a creative side and wants to play around with blending teas
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Postby macatea » Sep 26th, '07, 13:33

studio271 wrote:
Point is, I tried some Silver Needle from Rishi Tea about a month ago, and found it to be the absolute most disgusting tea I've ever had, thus helping enforce to me the idea that everything is relative. What I didn't like about it was that it was almost chemical-tasting, and that was when I brewed it at just 170 degrees for only 30 seconds. I just happen to really like my white tea flavored, I guess.

!


I've read on this thread many ways to brew Silver Needle. I should really start a new thread, but oh well. I know that brewing tea times is all personal preference, but I've seen steep times from 30 seconds like the person above, to 5 minutes up to 7 minutes! Given the 2-3 tsp (3 grams) AT 175 degrees F constants using rishi Silver Needle, what is the best brew time? Thanks for your input on this subject matter.

Bernie
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Postby Chip » Sep 26th, '07, 13:48

I like a lot of infusions, so I keep my steep times low and use a little more leaf.

I usually brew the first steep for 1-2 minutes, maybe a little cooler, 170*. I use 3-4 grams, but have also used 5 grams, per 200 ml (6.8 oz). I then increase brew times and temps with each successive brewing. Yin Zhen should yield 3-5 steeps w/o any problem if it is fresh and good quality.
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