What type of tea is Adagio Earl Grey Bravo?

These teas can resemble virtually any flavor imaginable.

What type of tea is Adagio Earl Grey Bravo?

Postby tjausti » Mar 24th, '09, 09:42

What type of tea is Adagio Earl Grey Bravo? I know it says in the description its from Srilanka <SP> but what type of tea is it if I wanted to buy some with out the bergamot flavoring?

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Postby Cinnamon Kitty » Mar 24th, '09, 10:29

Sri Lanka is another name for Ceylon. A comparable non-flavored tea would be Adagio's Ceylon Sonata or Ceylon Waltz tea.

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Postby Chip » Mar 24th, '09, 10:30

Not sure exactly, but Sri Lanka is also known by its former name in tea circles as Ceylon. Many sites still refer to it as Ceylon. It is generally good basic black and is very often used in blends and flavored teas.

Edit: CK beat me to it ...

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Postby silvermage2000 » Mar 24th, '09, 11:48

If you want a earl grey with out alot of bergamot I would suggest check out some earl gray creams.

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Postby sneakers » May 16th, '09, 21:19

Chip wrote:Not sure exactly, but Sri Lanka is also known by its former name in tea circles as Ceylon. Many sites still refer to it as Ceylon. It is generally good basic black and is very often used in blends and flavored teas.

Edit: CK beat me to it ...


Yes, it's the old name for the country, but the tea is still called "Ceylon." And it's one of my staples.:) :) :)

Is it true that English Breakfast and Irish Breakfast are generally blends of Assam and African tea?

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Postby geeber1 » May 16th, '09, 23:35

I think that depends on the vendor.

Adagio's English B-fast is Keemun, but their Irish B-fast is an Assam and Ceylon blend, but I have seen others use different blends. Most of the English B-fasts I've seen, though have been 100% Keemun. (maybe different varieties blended?)

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