Korean Teas?


For general/other topics related to tea.

Korean Teas?

Postby TEAcipes » Jun 9th, '09, 12:12

Does anybody else drink Korean tea here?

Personally I am a sucker for Korean Citron tea (Yujacha). I first had it when I had a terrible throat cold and didn't feel like eating - so all I drank was Yujacha. Ever since I've been hooked, and now I'm getting suckered into the world of Korean teas. I'm also into Jujube teas and quince teas, as well as corn tea.
I usually purchase these at the local Korean market (or have it at a Korean restaurant).

Discuss? :D
User avatar
TEAcipes
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Jun 4th, '0
Location: irvine, CA

Postby Victoria » Jun 9th, '09, 12:42

Since we are neighbors, I was wondering what Korean Market you shop at?

I have not tried Korean corn tea, but I'd like to. I have been to Hankook Teas in LA a few times, and tried their green and yellow. Korean oolongs are pretty hard to track down, but I've had those too.
:)
User avatar
Victoria
 
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 8th, '0
Location: Southern CA

Postby Mrs. Chip » Jun 9th, '09, 13:15

Victoria wrote:I have not tried Korean corn tea, but I'd like to. I have been to Hankook Teas in LA a few times, and tried their green and yellow. Korean oolongs are pretty hard to track down, but I've had those too. :)

TEAcipes and Victoria, my very best friend is Korean and we often go to Korean Markets with her. In fact, in my cup right now is a combo of corn, barley and green tea.

It is best not to buy the corn tea, but instead just buy the bags of corn and barley and mix and make your own. The bags should be located in the 'tea aisle' and there will be beaucoup to choose from. It definately is an aquired taste, in fact you may not like it at all. But my suggestion again would be to buy individual bags of whatever type of grain/corn looks interesting to you and have some fun!

BTW, Chip, my Teamaster may have some words of wisdom to add! :wink:
.
User avatar
Mrs. Chip
 
Posts: 604
Joined: Apr 27th, '

Postby Chip » Jun 9th, '09, 13:32

I too enjoy certain Korean "teas" however not so much Korean TEAS. :lol: I seem to like the nutty taste and aroma of the roasted grain beverages that are very common in Korea and Korean markets.

Mugi (barley) is a staple around here, and I often roast my own to taste. Same with rice.

Roasted corn is cheap in the tea aisle of any Korean market. I generally like to use it more in blends. I would not know what corn to use for roasting, so I usually just buy it.

I received a bunch of Korean herbal type tea samples from Hankook. I guess I should break them out.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22140
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby TEAcipes » Jun 9th, '09, 13:32

Victoria wrote:Since we are neighbors, I was wondering what Korean Market you shop at?

:)


Victoria, I shop at all sorts - mainly at H mart because it's the closest to my office, but I also enjoy shopping at Freshia (because the Hottok truck is there on weekends!!! Mmmm) as well as Zion (because they have an awesome bakery).

Mrs. Chip,
I agree, I usually buy the corn-barley mix tea bags too. I never thought of making my own though! Since I buy mixed grains to cook with my rice, I should experiment...
Funny that your best friend is Korean! Mr. TEAcipes is Korean-Japanese, but he despises corn tea. He does drink an awful lot of Yujacha with seltzer water during the summer though!
User avatar
TEAcipes
 
Posts: 56
Joined: Jun 4th, '0
Location: irvine, CA

Postby Victoria » Jun 9th, '09, 13:38

Mrs. Chip wrote: TEAcipes and Victoria, my very best friend is Korean and we often go to Korean Markets with her. In fact, in my cup right now is a combo of corn, barley and green tea.

It is best not to buy the corn tea, but instead just buy the bags of corn and barley and mix and make your own. The bags should be located in the 'tea aisle' and there will be beaucoup to choose from. It definately is an aquired taste, in fact you may not like it at all. But my suggestion again would be to buy individual bags of whatever type of grain/corn looks interesting to you and have some fun!

BTW, Chip, my Teamaster may have some words of wisdom to add! :wink:
.

Your best friend is Korean? My husband is Korean!! That is why I have such a strong interest in things Korean. :wink:

Pardon my ignorance here, but isn't corn tea its own thing, as in; it doesn't really have tea in it? If you take the grains and add them to green tea it becomes Genmaicha, right?
.
User avatar
Victoria
 
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 8th, '0
Location: Southern CA

Postby Mrs. Chip » Jun 9th, '09, 13:47

Victoria wrote:
Mrs. Chip wrote: TEAcipes and Victoria, my very best friend is Korean and we often go to Korean Markets with her. In fact, in my cup right now is a combo of corn, barley and green tea.
BTW, Chip, my Teamaster may have some words of wisdom to add! :wink:
.

Your best friend is Korean? My husband is Korean!! That is why I have such a strong interest in things Korean. :wink:
Pardon my ignorance here, but isn't corn tea its own thing, as in; it doesn't really have tea in it? If you take the grains and add them to green tea it becomes Genmaicha, right?.

Well, I am far from an expert, but yes, corn tea is not tea and can certainly stand alone, but I do like to mix it with other grains. Genmaicha, I believe, is a blend of rice and green tea, not corn and green tea.
User avatar
Mrs. Chip
 
Posts: 604
Joined: Apr 27th, '

Postby Victoria » Jun 9th, '09, 14:05

Mrs. Chip wrote:
Victoria wrote:
Mrs. Chip wrote: TEAcipes and Victoria, my very best friend is Korean and we often go to Korean Markets with her. In fact, in my cup right now is a combo of corn, barley and green tea.
BTW, Chip, my Teamaster may have some words of wisdom to add! :wink:
.

Your best friend is Korean? My husband is Korean!! That is why I have such a strong interest in things Korean. :wink:
Pardon my ignorance here, but isn't corn tea its own thing, as in; it doesn't really have tea in it? If you take the grains and add them to green tea it becomes Genmaicha, right?.

Well, I am far from an expert, but yes, corn tea is not tea and can certainly stand alone, but I do like to mix it with other grains. Genmaicha, I believe, is a blend of rice and green tea, not corn and green tea.


Oh thanks for the clarification. I didn't realize Genmaicha was only with rice. I thought it was any grain added to green tea, no wonder I was confused. So there is no real name for what you make up, the varied grains with green tea?

I still want to try corn tea sometime. I have a couple of other Korean friends who like it.

TEAcipes wrote:Mr. TEAcipes is Korean-Japanese, but he despises corn tea. He does drink an awful lot of Yujacha with seltzer water during the summer though!


Yeah my husband doesn't like it either.

I have been wanting to go to that big Ranch Market down off Jefferey. Have you been there? Where is Freshia? For baked good we sometimes drive all the way to Kings Hawaiian, LOL. I think we need to compare notes!! :)
You do know about Mitsuwa, right?
.
User avatar
Victoria
 
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 8th, '0
Location: Southern CA

Postby Mrs. Chip » Jun 9th, '09, 14:32

Victoria wrote:
Oh thanks for the clarification. I didn't realize Genmaicha was only with rice. I thought it was any grain added to green tea, no wonder I was confused. So there is no real name for what you make up, the varied grains with green tea?
I still want to try corn tea sometime. I have a couple of other Korean friends who like it.

Hey V, maybe our glossary will contain the 'real name' of this mystery concoction! :lol: If there is a real name...let's ask Chip :wink: Oh Chip......

Seriously, I really don't know if there is an actual term or not, however Chip may know, I do not. I do like corn tea, just better with a few other additions.
.
User avatar
Mrs. Chip
 
Posts: 604
Joined: Apr 27th, '

Postby Chip » Jun 9th, '09, 14:43

Mugi genmai con corncha? :lol: I do not really know if they have a name for it per se.

Recently at a Korean restuarant, they served us a "tea," I said it tasted like roasted corn tea, our Korean friend said it tasted like barley, I then said it is both. Which it turned out was correct, so even Koreans do mix grains for tea, but our Korean friend had no name for it.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22140
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby Victoria » Jun 9th, '09, 15:03

Thanks Chip. I think that is very interesting that most of the Korean restaurants we have been to here and in Hawaii, serve oolong. Maybe to appeal to our more abundant cultural diversity.

TEAcipes - I Googled H-Market and we will be making a trip there this weekend!
Thanks for the scoop!
User avatar
Victoria
 
Posts: 8186
Joined: Jan 8th, '0
Location: Southern CA

Postby hooksie » Jun 9th, '09, 16:15

Victoria wrote:
Oh thanks for the clarification. I didn't realize Genmaicha was only with rice.


Genmaicha is a blend of green tea, rice and popcorn. :)
User avatar
hooksie
 
Posts: 257
Joined: Jan 12th, '
Location: RI, USA

Postby Chip » Jun 9th, '09, 16:20

hooksie wrote:
Victoria wrote:
Oh thanks for the clarification. I didn't realize Genmaicha was only with rice.


Genmaicha is a blend of green tea, rice and popcorn. :)

I believe it is actually popped rice. A percentage of rice pops when roasted. 8)
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22140
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby hooksie » Jun 9th, '09, 20:51

Chip wrote:
hooksie wrote:
Victoria wrote:
Oh thanks for the clarification. I didn't realize Genmaicha was only with rice.


Genmaicha is a blend of green tea, rice and popcorn. :)

I believe it is actually popped rice. A percentage of rice pops when roasted. 8)


I had originally based my statement off Adagio's genmaicha page.

However after further research you are indeed correct. :)
User avatar
hooksie
 
Posts: 257
Joined: Jan 12th, '
Location: RI, USA

Postby chamekke » Jun 9th, '09, 22:14

I'm hooked on dunggule-cha, or Solomon's Seal tea. It's dried and roasted, so it has a barley-like flavour. (In fact, the kind that I buy locally is actually 80% Solomon's Seal, 20% roasted rice.)

It's a truly delicious tea - and apparently very good for the digestion! It was first served to me at a local Korean restaurant, where it is the accompaniment of all meals... yum :D

P.S. Pronounced doong - goo - lay - chaw (more or less).
User avatar
chamekke
 
Posts: 1970
Joined: Apr 6th, '0
Location: British Columbia, Canada

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation