multiple infusion issue with green tea


Made from leaves that have not been oxidized.

multiple infusion issue with green tea

Postby jogrebe » Aug 30th, '06, 15:17

Is it just me or does it often seem like with a fair number of green teas such as Dragonwell and Gyokuro that take multiple infusions that the second and third infusions are not as good as the first one. Am I doing anything wrong or does it just normally end up this way when you do multiple infusions with green tea?
User avatar
jogrebe
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Jun 15th, '
Location: Norristown, PA

Postby Warden Andy » Aug 30th, '06, 16:08

I never really had much luck with multiple infusions when I used to brew green tea western style. Unless you use a good amount of leaves, green tea will usually give up after one infusion.
User avatar
Warden Andy
 
Posts: 221
Joined: Feb 12th, '

Postby procarel » Aug 30th, '06, 17:30

I asked Two Hills Tea that question when I was going to order some Dragonwell tea and he basically said that the first infusion was for taste and the second for thirst but I found that I was pleased with the second and even third infusion. I used about a tablespoon of tea per 16 ounces water at 195 F for about two, three and then four minutes. The flavor was mild but I wouldn't say that it was too weak. It definitely taste better brewed at 195 or even 185. When I tried near boiling it was not good as you would expect of a green tea.
procarel
 
Posts: 43
Joined: Dec 13th, '

Postby rhpot1991 » Aug 31st, '06, 12:01

I have experimented a bit with a 2nd infusion for green and black teas. I normally make 14oz cups, so the initial infusion is 1.5 tsp. Then I add around 1 tsp for the 2nd infustion. Seems to work out well.

-John
User avatar
rhpot1991
 
Posts: 157
Joined: Nov 3rd, '0

Postby jogrebe » Aug 31st, '06, 15:32

Interesting, I've been doing experiments with other types of green teas and it seems as if the it depends upon the type of tea as I've found that Pi Lo Chun reinfuses another time or so and will give tea that is just as good as the first infusion. The same holds for the sample of Lu An Gua Pian that I was given.

rhpot1991 wrote:I have experimented a bit with a 2nd infusion for green and black teas. I normally make 14oz cups, so the initial infusion is 1.5 tsp. Then I add around 1 tsp for the 2nd infustion. Seems to work out well.

-John


Wow rhpot1991, what types of black teas are you getting multiple infusions out of? The only black tea that I was ever able to get a second brew that was as good as the first was the black gunpowder tea which I'm guessing was only because the leaves were not fully exposed to the hot water in the first brew before they blew up.
User avatar
jogrebe
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Jun 15th, '
Location: Norristown, PA

Postby Proinsias » Aug 31st, '06, 20:46

Is it not because there is an extra spoonful of tea being added for the second infusion?
Proinsias
 
Posts: 1535
Joined: Mar 19th, '
Location: On the couch

Postby Chip » Oct 16th, '06, 12:52

I drink green tea 90% of the time and have for years. But even more so this year since I eliminated black tea from my menu. Jo, if you are not getting more than one infusion, it may have nothing to do with how you are preparing your tea.

I have found that Japanese tea of a broad price range from a very reliable source will give 3-4 infusions....the first is light and fragrant , the 2nd is the best and the boldest and usually the greenest, the 3 &4th I start increasing temp and reducing water used...the results will vary greatly depending on the tea. But for Gyokuru, you should be able to get at least 3 infusions and often 5 assuming the tea is not old or stale and has been preserved properly. It is important that once you open a Japanese green to use it within 1-2 months...that is critical. Always make sure you are buying current harvest Japanese tea, and if it has been nitro flushed in Japan that is the best...Japanese tea detiorates very quickly when it is exposed to air, light, etc.

Chinese greens are so variable in leaf form and manufacture...it is impossible to give a rule of thumb. Long Jings, my fav, should give 2-3 quality infusions...again the tea needs to be fresh and stored properly.

Generally, I get 2-3 infusions from my Chinese green tea...but I always buy fresh from a reliable source who is willing to share harvest info, especially season and year of production. I recently discontinued using a vendor who simply would not share this info...they have a bijillion teas...probably half of which were from the previous year. That will not cut it. As buyers of premium green teas, I would encourage you to insist that harvest info be readily available and prominantly displayed on your vendors site. If they refuse, it may be time to move on because there are many reputable vendors who readily provide this info.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22115
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby runrabbit » Oct 18th, '06, 09:44

I've not had a problem with multiple infusions, but agree that the first infusion has more of a fragrance effect to it than the rest. It's usually on this infusion I can really tell the character of the tea and whether it's been blended or not. The taste is so clear, there's no where for flavours to hide.

The second infusion settles more heavily on my tounge. I'm not sure whether it's caffiene that rolls the flavour from the tip of my tounge to the back. The essential character is the same as the first infusion but it's a little more 'fleshy'

The third, fourth infusions usually match the second. And, if I've done things right, so does the fifth. I don't usually brew more than this, even if I'm with friends. We're far too eager to try something else!

Except for a supply of Liu An Gua Pian which I dip into every now and then, I don't drink much green. I'm usually brewing for friends who have brought things back on their travels and want to share. Bi Luo Chun is a tricky one to brew, keep trying!
The best lesson about brewing green was when I was studying with a friend. She insisted on keeping the water temp. low (too low, I thought) and brewed for a longer amount of time than I was used to. It worked. Many infusions, true flavour each time.
Be patient, let that water cool down.
runrabbit
 
Posts: 8
Joined: Sep 5th, '0

Postby jogrebe » Oct 18th, '06, 16:32

runrabbit wrote:I've not had a problem with multiple infusions, but agree that the first infusion has more of a fragrance effect to it than the rest. It's usually on this infusion I can really tell the character of the tea and whether it's been blended or not. The taste is so clear, there's no where for flavours to hide.


Right and with those teas its not worth brewing multiple infusions in my opinion even if its possible to brew more tea out of the leaves when it won't be as good as the first cup. With the one possible exception of when you are making tea for more than yourself and it is not going to you :twisted:
User avatar
jogrebe
 
Posts: 478
Joined: Jun 15th, '
Location: Norristown, PA

Postby tenuki » Nov 2nd, '06, 18:50

my experience is that it depends entirely on the particular green tea. I have a current favorite who's second infusion I like better than the first, and I get at least 3 out of it every time. But I brew at a very low temperature the first time and increase each brewing.

Whatever works for you, test out your particular tea.
User avatar
tenuki
 
Posts: 2339
Joined: Oct 23rd, '
Location: Seattle Area

Postby kissmyhuman » Dec 24th, '06, 20:59

Personally I've found good results with using a quicker first infusion, around a minute, 1:30 max, and then a two min, 2:30 max, second infusion. Taste level was similar, the second infusion was slightly bolder. Past two infusions for the tea I buy and it ends up weak and slightly sharp/bitter.
kissmyhuman
 
Posts: 34
Joined: Dec 24th, '

Postby Salsero » Feb 7th, '07, 21:29

runrabbit wrote: Except for a supply of Liu An Gua Pian which I dip into every now and then


Runrabbit--

Any tips on successfully brewing Liu An Gua Pian. I've been have trouble getting a really satisfying brew: 6 oz water at 170, 3 gr tea, 3 minute brew. Just seems too subtle with a tiny sour taste, otherwise I like what's there. Just want more!
User avatar
Salsero
 
Posts: 5214
Joined: Dec 21st, '
Location: Gainesville, Florida

Postby Chip » Feb 7th, '07, 22:25

Salsero wrote:
runrabbit wrote: Except for a supply of Liu An Gua Pian which I dip into every now and then


Runrabbit--

Any tips on successfully brewing Liu An Gua Pian. I've been have trouble getting a really satisfying brew: 6 oz water at 170, 3 gr tea, 3 minute brew. Just seems too subtle with a tiny sour taste, otherwise I like what's there. Just want more!


Well, Runrabbit is out inspecting tea plants...so in his stead... 8)

I really like this tea but I seem to be doing it a lot differently. I go with 4 grams, 170* is good, and shorter infusions...1-2 minutes. I get 3 enjoyable steeps this way.

It reminds me of long jing but is more vegetal than nutty.
User avatar
Chip
Mod/Admin
 
Posts: 22115
Joined: Apr 22nd, '
Location: Back in the TeaCave atop Mt. Fuji

Postby Salsero » Feb 7th, '07, 23:34

Yeh, it looks like Long Jing sort of. Maybe the long steep is causing the sour taste. In fact, that taste seems like something I've run across in very strongly brewed Gyokuro. Doesn't work well with the nutty flavor.

So .. ..

More tea, less time, same temp . . .

I'll try that.
User avatar
Salsero
 
Posts: 5214
Joined: Dec 21st, '
Location: Gainesville, Florida

Postby Salsero » Feb 8th, '07, 00:37

Yes, that combination is working quite well for me. Thanks again, Chip!
User avatar
Salsero
 
Posts: 5214
Joined: Dec 21st, '
Location: Gainesville, Florida

Next

Instant Messenger

Permissions
You cannot post new topics
You cannot reply to topics
You cannot edit your posts
You cannot delete your posts
You cannot post attachments
Navigation